(206) 949-5683, Top Rated Plumber, Seattle
Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Installing washer machine outlet to the wall.

  1. #1

    Default Installing washer machine outlet to the wall.

    This building is 40 years old. The utility sink waste is 1 1/2 PVC in the wall. Would there be a problem installing a recessed outlet five feet above the ground that takes 2' PVC and adapting it to the 1 1/2 inch PVC at the 12 inch above floor area pipe? Right now the waste goes right in the sink. But I am afraid of the pipes not taking it and backing up. The washer machine is a 15 year old Maytag.

  2. #2
    In the Trades Gary Swart's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Yakima WA
    Posts
    7,246

    Default

    Drain pipes should never be reduced. That said, you would probably get away with it until you get a new washer. Newer machines pump their water out at a very high rate and require a 2" drain. It would be best if you can go 2" all the way. By the way, don't forget this needs to be trapped and vented.

  3. #3

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Swart View Post
    Drain pipes should never be reduced. That said, you would probably get away with it until you get a new washer. Newer machines pump their water out at a very high rate and require a 2" drain. It would be best if you can go 2" all the way. By the way, don't forget this needs to be trapped and vented.
    Trapped???? I understand vented. This is all done I assume.

    I have to think I am better off not doing this upgrade. A new house no problem. But this was built 40 years ago and to spend this time and money and find out it does not work is too much a risk.

  4. #4
    DIY Senior Member Mike Swearingen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    On Albemarle Sound In Northeastern NC
    Posts
    621

    Default

    What Gary is saying is that your proposed washer standpipe also has to have a trap at the bottom and then a vent after that trap, if you move the washer discharge out of the trapped and vented sink. The sink drain line won't be trapped since the existing trap is under the sink.
    If I were you, I would leave it alone or hire a pro plumber to install a 2" washer drain standpipe and line for you.
    Good luck!
    Mike

  5. #5
    In the Trades Gary Swart's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Yakima WA
    Posts
    7,246

    Default

    Musicis, every drain in the house must have a P-trap and be vented. The toilet is the only fixture that has its own built in trap. The nature of your question makes me concerned that you do not have enough basic plumbing knowledge to take this on as a DIY project. Take Mike's advice and get a professional to do this job.

  6. #6
    Aspiring Old Fart, EE, computer & networking geek Mikey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Central Florida
    Posts
    2,686

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by musicis View Post
    The utility sink waste is 1 1/2 PVC in the wall.
    Do you mean the vertical pipe behind the wall is 1 1/2", or just the pipe from the sink's trap leading into the wall? In my garage, the utility sink had a 1 1/4" drain and P-trap leading into a 2" vertical in the wall, which was both a drain and a vent, since it went up through the roof. It was an easy matter to move the existing P-trap into the wall and install a combo drain and faucet assembly high in the wall as you intend to do. If your sink drains into a 1 1/2" vertical pipe in the wall, then you're out of luck.

  7. #7
    In the Trades Bob NH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    3,307

    Default

    You are better off leaving it discharging into the utility sink. Just be sure the drain plug is tied off in some way that it doesn't inadvertantly get plugged while the washer is discharging. Also, make a little sign that says "Make sure the sink is empty before using the washing machine".

    I made a little clip to hold the hose on the edge of the sink to keep it from falling off.

    The fact that you have the sink as a buffer to the washer gives it the capacity to handle the high flow of modern washers. Mine was overflowing the 1-1/2" standpipe that was installed more than 40 years ago. I installed a sink on the same line and have never had a problem. The sink fills about 40% during the maximum discharge of the washer, and the greater head increases the capacity of the drain.

  8. #8
    In the Trades Gary Swart's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Yakima WA
    Posts
    7,246

    Default

    If you can't go 100% with 2" into the drain, then stay with the utility sink for the reasons Bob mentioned. Even if a 1-1/2" would work with your current washer, eventually you will have to replace it and then the 1-1/2" would be too small. There's absolutely nothing wrong with dumping the water into the utility sink, and it will save you time, money, and effort.

  9. #9

    Default

    I went to this site because I was concerned. Good thing I had the smarts to come here first and confirm my worries. Thanks to all of you for posting your replies. Happy New Year!!!

  10. #10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Swart View Post
    Musicis, every drain in the house must have a P-trap and be vented. The toilet is the only fixture that has its own built in trap. The nature of your question makes me concerned that you do not have enough basic plumbing knowledge to take this on as a DIY project. Take Mike's advice and get a professional to do this job.
    I thought that if there was a vent "close" to where you do an update that you do not have to vent, just trap.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •