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Thread: Replacing Toilet supply line

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  1. #1
    DIY Member gtmtnbiker's Avatar
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    Default Replacing Toilet supply line

    I'm in the middle of a project where I'm painting the bathroom. To make it easier for me, I pulled the toilet out. Plus, I intended to replace the "nipple" since it was painted and I want the chrome look.

    As you can see from the attached picture, it's not a nipple that I can unthread. There's 1/2" pipe coming out the wall. It's hard to tell but it appears that there's a 1/2" chrome? pipe soldered to the angle stop and then soldered to the 1/2" copper pipe. I think it's chrome but it also has some copper color on it.

    There's a bulge in the pipe because I started to wrench it thinking it was a threaded nipple. Boy, that teaches me to make assumptions.

    Has anyone seen this before and can determine what type of connections were made?

    I'm planning to take off the "nipple" by unsweating the pipe and cleaning up the solder. My thought was to solder a coupling onto the 1/2" copper stub that has female pipe threads. Then I attach a chrome nipple and a new quarter turn angle stop.

    Does this sound like a good plan? If not, what would you suggest?

    I'm located in Mass. Thanks!
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    Plumber BAPlumber's Avatar
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    looks to me that the wall needs to be opened and the copper tubing replaced. I don't think unsweating will help.
    Brent

  3. #3
    DIY Member gtmtnbiker's Avatar
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    I would like to avoid opening the wall if possible. If I went that route, I would put a drop-ear elbow with female threads and secure it to some blocking.

    In case it wasn't clear, I'm referring to unsweating the "chrome pipe" that it attached to the 1/2 copper. Why do you think it will not work?

    If it helps anyone, the house was built in 1966.

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    Plumber BAPlumber's Avatar
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    from the pictures you posted, everything is in copper. considering the solder joints, I'd open the wall and fix it right or the job will look like shit and most contractors don't want that.
    Brent

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    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    It is a "retrofit" sweat on stop, probably made by Brasscraft. It was used because the copper, (not steel or brass), stub was too short for a conventional compression or sweat stop. Your best option would probably to unsweat it and install a new valve of the same type.

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    Plumber jimbo's Avatar
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    We are happy to provide advice on this. I must point out, however, that in Massachusetts, the fine for doing this yourself is $2500. Homeowners are absolutely PROHIBITED from doing any work on thier own plumbing system. http://www.mass.gov/?pageID=ocasubto...tters&sid=Eoca

  7. #7
    DIY Member gtmtnbiker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hj View Post
    It is a "retrofit" sweat on stop, probably made by Brasscraft. It was used because the copper, (not steel or brass), stub was too short for a conventional compression or sweat stop. Your best option would probably to unsweat it and install a new valve of the same type.
    Hi HJ, I'll try to post a better picture tonight. I'm not sure that it's a retrofit because all three toilets are plumbed similarly. The toilets are all original to the house.

    I looked at the upstairs toilet and see that there's 1/2" pipe attached to the 1/2" pipe and angle stop via a coupling.

    The toilet that I'm working on does not have a coupling. The pipe connected to the angle stop appears to be chrome and the copper coming out of the wall sits inside it. It's weird, I haven't seen this before.

    The upstairs toilets are missing the shroud covering the pipe and the hole in the wall. It would seem odd that the plumber who worked on the house would leave it off. In addition, they have braided supply lines between the toilet and the angle stop. The downstairs bath had 3/8" chrome between the angle stop and toilet.

    So maybe you're right that some previous homeowner butchered all 3 toilet supplies?

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