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Thread: OWB's

  1. #1
    DIY Junior Member tinner666's Avatar
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    Default OWB's

    I thought I'd start one on Outdoor Wood Boilers. I planning on getting one to hook into the system of our new house. I have 18 acres of hardwood, so it seems like a good choice to me.

    Anybody here with any experience with them. Any input would be welcome. Especially if anybody here has firsthand experience with them.
    Frank Albert

  2. #2
    DIY Junior Member Tracker83's Avatar
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    I own one, and installed it myself. What exactly would you like to know?

  3. #3

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    Frank,
    any particular reason you want an outdoor wood boiler ? An indoor unit with a storage tank can be much more efficient. you may even be able to go for days with out firing it. Sure you have to bring some wood indoors but otherwise you need to go outdoors to bring the wood to the boiler

    Lou

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    DIY Junior Member tinner666's Avatar
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    We are moving to a new home. 25 acres of hardwood and poplar.

    I have one storage building/shop area. Putting in an 1800sf house and 5000sf shop. An OWB in the center would be within 100' of each.

    I was figuring on a radiant floor for the shop. Add to forced air in house, some type of unit the other one. Nearly free heat.
    By time I get a few more areas cleared, I'll have 20 cords of wood put by. I asked and got answers from a friend at the RCS Forum, http://www.rooferscoffeeshop.com/for...ge=2&forumid=0
    but I'm still making enquiries. The more I know, pro and con of different models and owner stories, the better prepared I'll be.

    TO be honest, I'm a bit burnt out today to ask objective questions, but any comment you have about them would be great.
    Frank Albert

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    In the Trades Bob NH's Avatar
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    Some jusirdictions are passing laws and ordinances to restrict or prohibit them because of the smoke pollution. One problem has been that they are usually installed with short stacks so the smoke is released a lot lower to the ground than when an indoor stove vents through a chimney that is higher than the roof of the house.

    Some good links follow:

    http://www.newsvine.com/_news/2007/1...-boilers-grows

    http://www.woodheat.org/technology/obmanufacturer.htm

    http://www.woodheat.org/dhw/dhw.htm

    http://www.woodheat.org/index.htm

  6. #6
    DIY Junior Member tinner666's Avatar
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    Thanks for the links. I had seen most, but not all. The last was a good one.

    We're in an agricultural district and have no restrictions on them. Central Boiler is near us, but I'm looking at all and comparing notes.
    Frank Albert

  7. #7
    DIY Junior Member tinner666's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tracker83 View Post
    I own one, and installed it myself. What exactly would you like to know?
    How complicated was yours? What brand? What building(s) are you heating?
    Frank Albert

  8. #8
    In the Trades Bob NH's Avatar
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    I have a wood stove from the late '70s that still lives in my lower level. I haven't studied wood boilers but looking at the on-line stuff and tinners question, I'm inclined to wonder about an alternative.

    The issue with the boilers seems to be that you need to have a hot firebox to convert the wood to gas (therefore no water tubes in the firebox), a place to burn the gas (which is largely carbon monoxide) with additional air, and a place to remove the heat from the gas.

    Just doing a mental tradeoff of the alternatives, I would think seriously about putting a wood-fired furnace in or immediately adjacent to the 5000 sq ft shop. The heat leakage through and around the unit would supplement the heat in the shop which would primarily come from an air heat exchanger at the top of the furnace.

    The heat to the house could go via water or steam that would be heated by a smaller heat exchanger in the heat-exchange section of the furnace.

    http://www.yukon-eagle.com/FURNACES/...8/Default.aspx

    http://www.motherearthnews.com/DIY/2...tral-Heat.aspx

  9. #9

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    Frank,
    one other plug for the inside wood boiler is no smoke. With a modest size storage tank you only have to fire it at full throttle every other day or so. A good hot fire will convert more of the wood to gas, allowing you to use less wood. OWB's will sit there and smolder which can be annoying reguardless of their being any restrictions

    Lou

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    Plumber jimbo's Avatar
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    Well, I might as well add my usual comment: Al Gore would like to talk to you about this smogger.

  11. #11
    In the Trades Bob NH's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jimbo View Post
    Well, I might as well add my usual comment: Al Gore would like to talk to you about this smogger.
    But it has no carbon footprint because all of the fuel is renewable. May tinner could sell his carbon credits to Al.

  12. #12
    Plumber jimbo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob NH View Post
    But it has no carbon footprint because all of the fuel is renewable. May tinner could sell his carbon credits to Al.
    Renewable has nothing to do with it. After all, coal and oil are renewable, but not in our lifetime.


    A Carbon Footprint is a measure of the impact human activities have on the environment in terms of the amount of green house gases produced, measured in units of carbon dioxide.

  13. #13
    DIY Junior Member tinner666's Avatar
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    Great replies guys.
    And Bob, thanks for the Yukon link. I requested info from them.

    If I go with the OWB, it will be uphill from the house, about 60-80', and probably within 50-70' of the shop. Not sure yet of shop or possible OWB final sites.

    I'm even considering the GreenWood http://www.greenwoodfurnace.com/ I think it was featured on HGTV as smokeless.


    Please feel free to add any more comments guys!
    Frank Albert

  14. #14

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    Frank,
    that greenwood looks like a good unit. another good name is TARM. Its only smokeless when firing at full blast. They are not like an oil or gas unit that can shut off for days at a time then come back on with no issues If you add a good amount of storage you can easily meet all your heating demands all year with a minimum amount of work by only running the unit at full blast to heat the storage then extract the heat from the tank

    here is a link for storage tanks, I think they make them for tarm
    www.stsscoinc.com

    Lou

  15. #15
    DIY Junior Member Tracker83's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jimbo View Post
    Renewable has nothing to do with it. After all, coal and oil are renewable, but not in our lifetime.


    A Carbon Footprint is a measure of the impact human activities have on the environment in terms of the amount of green house gases produced, measured in units of carbon dioxide.
    And burning wood is carbon neutral...

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