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Thread: City Service Pipe Diameter Chart

  1. #1

    Default City Service Pipe Diameter Chart

    I need to spec the pipe from the meter to the cottage/house. The connection coming off the meter is 3/4". I will have to measure the exact distance from the meter to the house, but its around 350'. Cottage is only 410 total sq. ft. Full kitchen and laundry, 3/4 bath. Two outside faucets, laundry, kitchen sink, dishwasher, icemaker, stove/pot filler, lavatory, shower and commode, say 9 fixtures. Self-building; no codes, permits or inspections.

    I would like to find the UPC sizing chart on the internet. Does anybody know where I could find it? When I do a search, I just get book offers. Is buying the book the only way to get this info?

    Please share your opinions on using PEP black pipe for the main feed pipe.

    Thank you.
    Last edited by BGTF; 11-25-2007 at 05:45 PM.

  2. #2
    Plumber jimbo's Avatar
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    This is not a code issue. The principal issue is the 250'. Using a nominl number like about 18 gallon per minute, a 1 1/4" pipe in from the meter will keep your PSI drop and water velocity at nice low numbers.

    ABS is never used as water supply. It is not available in smaller sizes, and is not usually sold in pressure rated types;

  3. #3

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    Thanks Jimbo....

    Did you look on the chart to determine 1-1/4"s would be the appropriate size? Do you know where I can find the chart on the internet?

    Also, you are correct on ABS... I meant black plastic pipe... I think it is PEP... I have read that the connections may become loose... What do you think about using it? PEX is too expensive... Any other coil alternatives?

    Thanks!

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by BGTF
    Also, you are correct on ABS... I meant black plastic pipe... I think it is PEP... I have read that the connections may become loose... What do you think about using it? PEX is too expensive... Any other coil alternatives?
    I think you mean PE - polyethylene. I use 200 PSI poly water service pipe. I use the brass connectors - required - and double all stainless clamps. I'm thinking it must work pretty well because I've been using it for 31 years and haven't ever seen the same job twice, nor have I had to replace a water service line done by anyone else, unless they were foolish enough to use lightweight stuff, like 80 PSI.

  5. #5

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    With a run that long I would think about adding a small presser tank at the house unless there is a lot of presser and you have a presser regulator at the house and not at the street.

  6. #6
    Sprinkler Guy Wet_Boots's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Herk View Post
    I think you mean PE - polyethylene. I use 200 PSI poly water service pipe. I use the brass connectors - required - and double all stainless clamps. I'm thinking it must work pretty well because I've been using it for 31 years and haven't ever seen the same job twice, nor have I had to replace a water service line done by anyone else, unless they were foolish enough to use lightweight stuff, like 80 PSI.
    Even better than any clamped poly fitting, are the compression fittings made by the waterworks companies, like Ford or McDonald. An insert goes into the end of the poly, so the compression force has something solid to work against. With the introduction of new poly resins, the material doesn't work with clamps and barbed fittings as well as the old pump installers' favorite of 160 psi medium-density poly. These compression fittings are generally used in conjunction with CTS sizes of poly service line, which are specified by outside diameter, as opposed to the usual ID specs for the cheaper poly used in lawn sprinkler systems.

    I would also lean towards a inch-and-a-quarter supply line, in conjuction with a standard 5/8 meter. This is based on bumping up the size from the usual 3/4 that would often be used for runs of 50 feet or less. And lucky for you, a big roll of 1-1/4 poly is 300 feet long, so you have enough for the run.

  7. #7
    Plumber jimbo's Avatar
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    This calculator is handy for quick reference on pipe flow and loss:

    http://www.irrigationtutorials.com/sprinkler09.htm

  8. #8

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    Thank you... I walked the line today with a rolling tape... It's 325 feet plus some to get into the house... I have edited my original posting to reflect this... Now I have more to figure out...

    Using the suggested calculator, I end up with a 3.9 psi loss... assuming Cl 160 psi (same as black pipe?), 1.25 diameter, 18gpm, 350' length. Is that acceptable? I guess that depends on the starting pressure... The property has a significant slope.... I would guess at least a 40' drop to the house, so I should gain some pressure from that....

    What are your opinions regarding using the butt connectors?

    All of your responses have been very helpful... Please keep them coming!...
    Last edited by BGTF; 11-25-2007 at 06:40 PM.

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