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Thread: wall texturing - tips/tricks??

  1. #1
    DIY Senior Member chris fox's Avatar
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    Default wall texturing - tips/tricks??

    Texturing a wall is probably my most dreaded things in DIY projects. Maybe I am too picky with the result or just not doing it right.

    Specifically I am remodling my master bath and at the point where I need to texture a 4' x 6' area, I added a pocket door for a walking closet. So of course I am dreading this task. I have used a texturing gun/hopper but made more of a mess than progress. Too orange peel look/too wet/too dry etc.

    The texture I have or what others have told me is a California knockdown a pic is at this post I posted the other day: http://http://www.terrylove.com/foru...ad.php?t=16757
    I tried Verdeboy's suggestion using vinyl spackel and had decent success, still not great but better than my previous attempts. Other attempts have been dabbing or flicking on joint compound, waiting 10 minutes and knockdown with a broad knife and crossing my fingers - it works OK with small areas and patches.
    So what to do or try for this 4'x6' area. The wall is pretty large so I dont want to fill the existing texture and redo a wall. Any ideas for feathering in?

    thanks
    Chris

  2. #2
    Plumber jimbo's Avatar
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    Matching texture is definitely an art form. For an area that size, I would probably get 2 or 3 of the spray cans, the kind with an adjustable nozzle or various size "straws". Spray cans are expensive, but save the hassle of getting an air sprayer. I have tried the hand-pump applicators, and personally was not very good at it. You might have better success, because I do not have an artistic flair.

    The first thing is to get a scrap 1/2 sheet of drywall out in the garage and practice you technique. Once you feel ready, go inside. Do plan to overlap into the existing finish lightly to get the "feathering" which will hide the boundary between old an new. Do not have any straight lines...work in curves.

    Once it's done, let it be. When dry, paint the entire wall, and this will further hide the boundary between new and old.

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    DIY Senior Member rdtompki's Avatar
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    I'm an avid DIY'er, but I don't do sheetrock for just the reason you describe. You're saving big bucks doing most of the work yourself. Why not find a good outfit that does sheetrock and is willing to do small jobs for a reasonable charge? I can't believe how well a pro can repair holes or match existing texture. I've had one company do a garage, kitchen, two bathrooms and a bedroom (hang rock, tape, texture) and I don't think the total exceeded $2500 for everything.

    Rick

  4. #4
    DIY Senior Member chris fox's Avatar
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    Rick,
    The problem I have is finding that right kind of person/company your describing. However, I havent stopped searching.

  5. #5

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    Have you considered checking the local fraternal organization of whatever (Elks etc...). They usually have lots of skilled labor in those places. They tend to be older guys that have more patience. The best drywallers I've ever found came from one of those places.

    Tom

  6. #6

    Default Wall Texture

    The vinyl spackle technique was only meant to be for very tiny areas, no bigger than a few inches.

    To match texture in larger areas, I've had no success with either the Homax pump sprays or the cans with multiple straws. All I seem to do is make a big mess with those.

    The best thing I've found for larger areas is to buy a bag of just the texture and mix it into the paint and roll it on. Then experiment with different amounts of texture, different roller covers, and use a drywall knife to knock it down and smoothe it out until you get the texture you want.
    Last edited by Verdeboy; 11-27-2007 at 11:42 AM.

  7. #7
    DIY Senior Member chris fox's Avatar
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    I experiemented with adding water to joint compound to create a slurry, then knockdown 15 minutes later this works ok. Shrinking and holes is the drawback to this technique.
    The vinyl spackle has worked on larger areas i.e. 8-10" but requires dragging on with a knife leaving, let set with ridges then sand down to a 1/8" it leaves puddle like details that match my knockdown. benefits are no shrinking.

    Chris

  8. #8

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    Vinyl spackle is definitely "da shit" when it comes to filling holes, cracks, and seams, since it doesn't shrink and you can make a nice texture out of it.

    You threw me off when you said 4' x 6' area. That size area would be easiest to do by rolling on textured paint, then knocking it down. Benefit is you won't have to paint your repair.

  9. #9
    DIY Senior Member chris fox's Avatar
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    Eric,

    I do have 4'x6' area where I added a pocket door wall, I am warming up to the best technique to tackle this larger area.
    I havent used textured paint but have seen it at HD. Dosent this give you more of a orange peel, sand effect?

    Chris

  10. #10
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    Textured paint tends to be quite thick, and the surface effect depends on the roller you use and if you do anything else to it after rolling it on.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by chris fox View Post
    Eric,

    I do have 4'x6' area where I added a pocket door wall, I am warming up to the best technique to tackle this larger area.
    I havent used textured paint but have seen it at HD. Dosent this give you more of a orange peel, sand effect?

    Chris

    As I mentioned before, buy the texture separately from the paint and add a little texture at a time until you get the desired look. A little texture gives you more of an orange peel appearance; a lot of texture gives you more of an acoustical ceiling look. You can always knock down and smoothe it out when wet or sand it once it's dry.

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