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Thread: Cloudy hot water:)

  1. #1
    DIY Member cruiser's Avatar
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    Default Cloudy hot water:)

    Hi all,

    Well I just spent the last three days repiping my old house from galv 1/2" to copper 3/4". In the process i also moved the hot water tank into the garage. When I switched on the water everything flowed where it should except for one leak

    However my hot water is coming out cloudy at all hot water faucets,it was not cloudy before the switch to 3/4" copper. I filled the tank with water before I connected the electricity. Ideas anyone?

    Thanks and happy thanksgiving

    Martin

  2. #2

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    Two theories.
    1. It's possible you broke up some buildup inside the water heater in the process of moving it.
    2. You have flux, solder, dirt, etc inside your pipes.

    I'd thoroughly flush the hot water heater, let it run for fifteen minutes or so or until it's running clear. If that doesn't solve it I'd remove the aerators on your facets and let them run for a while. If you still have a problem it sounds like water heater time. How old is the heater?

  3. #3
    Plumber Cass's Avatar
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    Most likely debris from the water heater.

    It should settle out within the next few days.

  4. #4
    DIY Member cruiser's Avatar
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    Thanks for the replys folks, the heater is just less than a year old though I'll try run the hot for 15 mins and will update

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    DIY Member cruiser's Avatar
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    Ran the hot for 25 mins still like the weather,cloudy

  6. #6

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    Fill up a cup with the hot water and wait a minute or two. Does the cloudiness disappear? If so, it's nothing more than tiny air bubbles.
    Last edited by Verdeboy; 11-22-2007 at 09:39 AM.

  7. #7
    DIY Member cruiser's Avatar
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    Eric,

    I did that and it the water does go clear after a couple of mins,so air it is. Any idea how it's getting in or how I can get rid of it? It's no harm but kinda looks gross(so the wife says).

    Martin

  8. #8
    DIY Senior Member Marlin336's Avatar
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    Do you have an expansion tank of your potable water system? If you do is it on the hot side?

  9. #9
    Rancher
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    Quote Originally Posted by cruiser View Post
    .I did that and it the water does go clear after a couple of mins,so air it is.
    We used to get this when I was a kid after the well pump had been pulled and replaced, I was never told the reason it got cloudy, but in hind sight and old age, I suspect that the water pressure was allowed to go very high, therefore impregnating the water with air. It's possible that the T&P valve on your water heater is not operating and you have a check valve at the house that doesn't allow the water pressure to escape? Can you manually operate the T&P valve, and see if it closes afterward? My experience is that you will have to replace it after testing it.

    Rancher

  10. #10
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    Default water

    Remove the faucet aerator and see if the problem goes away. Now that you have better volume and pressure the water may be getting overaerated.

  11. #11
    DIY Member cruiser's Avatar
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    I think we may have a winner,took off the aerator and it's way better still a bit cloudy but nearly sunny.Back to the turkey, thanks folks

  12. #12
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    When you cut the pipe, did you use the tool to reshape the inside so there wasn't a lip? That will cause a little turbulance. It's worse when the cutting wheel starts to get dull or if you tighten too much on each turn.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

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