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Thread: Electrical Options For Garbage Disposal Install

  1. #1

    Default Electrical Options For Garbage Disposal Install

    I need to install a garbage disposal, but there's no outlet under the sink. The closest outlet is to the right of the dishwasher. You can see from pic 1 that the dishwasher is plugged into the top of this outlet.

    I offered to tap into this outlet and install a toggle switch a few feet above that would only work 1/2 the duplex (after removing the connecting tabs).

    The homeowner nixed this, saying that her arthritis wouldn't allow her to walk the extra few feet to turn the G/D on and off. I offered to have the switch be above the sink, but she nixed that, because I would have to tear into a lot more of the wall and remove some tile.

    The only thing I can think of is to splice into the appliance cord and install a toggle switch that sits in a box that I'd put inside the dummy board under her counter (see pic 2). Is that up to code?

    Also, do they make an appliance cord with a toggle switch already built in?
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  2. #2

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    I see an unused opening to the right of the faucet. Why not get a air switch and turn the disposal on from there?

    Air Switch

    Let me guess.... the duplex in the photo is not grounded. If it isn't, DON"T USE IT! I would first check the dishwasher circuit. If it is grounded, then use that instead.
    Last edited by 480sparky; 11-09-2007 at 05:49 PM.
    Just my 2¢ worth.

  3. #3

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    Thanks, sparky.

    That's a very elegant solution to the problem. Didn't know those existed.

  4. #4
    DIY Member Backglass's Avatar
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    Wow, this could have saved me a lot of time & trouble on my last disposal install. I did some searching and In-Sink-erator has there own version of this. A great idea!

    (BTW: I'm no electrician, but that outlet scares me. Thats a big cord w/cheater plug.)

    Last edited by Terry; 09-12-2013 at 05:50 PM.

  5. #5

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    If none of the outlets are grounded in that old house, is it still against code to plug in a garbage disposal?

    I'm sure they've plugged in hundreds of appliances over the years in those ungrounded outlets.

  6. #6
    Jack of all trades frenchie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Verdeboy View Post
    If none of the outlets are grounded in that old house, is it still against code to plug in a garbage disposal?
    Yes, it is. The manufacturer's installation instructions rule, and they always require grounding.

    There might be a work-around you can do, running a new ground wire or something like that - I'm not sure - hopefully Mike or Petey or one of the other pro 'lectricians will drop by & enlighten us...
    Master Plumber Mark:

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  7. #7
    Electrical Contractor/Instructor jwelectric's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by frenchie View Post
    I'm not sure - hopefully Mike or Petey or one of the other pro 'lectricians will drop by & enlighten us...
    250.130(C) Nongrounding Receptacle Replacement or Branch Circuit Extensions. The equipment grounding conductor of a grounding-type receptacle or a branch-circuit extension shall be permitted to be connected to any of the following:
    (1) Any accessible point on the grounding electrode system as described in 250.50
    (2) Any accessible point on the grounding electrode conductor
    (3) The equipment grounding terminal bar within the enclosure where the branch circuit for the receptacle or branch circuit originates
    (4) For grounded systems, the grounded service conductor within the service equipment enclosure
    (5) For ungrounded systems, the grounding terminal bar within the service equipment enclosure

  8. #8
    Aspiring Old Fart, EE, computer & networking geek Mikey's Avatar
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    Wish I'd known about that InSinkerator Air Switch before I spent a day fishing a cable up to a new switch in the wall. Looks like it requires a grounded receptacle, though.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mikey View Post
    Wish I'd known about that InSinkerator Air Switch... Looks like it requires a grounded receptacle, though.
    Had to rub it in didn't you?
    Last edited by Verdeboy; 11-12-2007 at 09:11 AM.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by jwelectric View Post
    250.130(C) Nongrounding Receptacle Replacement or Branch Circuit Extensions. The equipment grounding conductor of a grounding-type receptacle or a branch-circuit extension shall be permitted to be connected to any of the following:
    (1) Any accessible point on the grounding electrode system as described in 250.50
    (2) Any accessible point on the grounding electrode conductor
    (3) The equipment grounding terminal bar within the enclosure where the branch circuit for the receptacle or branch circuit originates
    (4) For grounded systems, the grounded service conductor within the service equipment enclosure
    (5) For ungrounded systems, the grounding terminal bar within the service equipment enclosure
    Can someone put this in plain English for those of us who don't speak "Spark-Ese"?

  11. #11

    Default GFCI Okay?

    How's about I install a GFCI there and get rid of the ungrounded receptacle and 2-3 prong adapter. That way, at least the DW and G/D will be protected and maybe more, depending on what's downstream in that circuit.

  12. #12
    Jack of all trades frenchie's Avatar
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    I think what he meant is you can run a seperate ground for that box, then you'll be fine.

    I was you, I'd just wait for him to come back - if you ask nicely, he'll usually give you plain english. If not, wait for Petey.
    Master Plumber Mark:

    there is nothing better than the
    manly smell of WD 40 in the air
    while banging away on brass with a chisel and hammer...

    it smells like......victory......

    do not hit your thumb...
    __________________
    Just so everyone's clear: I'm the POODLE in the picture ("french", get it?) The hot woman is my wife.

  13. #13
    Electrical Contractor/Instructor jwelectric's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Verdeboy View Post
    How's about I install a GFCI there and get rid of the ungrounded receptacle and 2-3 prong adapter. That way, at least the DW and G/D will be protected and maybe more, depending on what's downstream in that circuit.
    This would be the simple solution

    406.3(D) (3) Non–grounding-Type Receptacles. Where grounding means does not exist in the receptacle enclosure, the installation shall comply with (D)(3)(a), (D)(3)(b), or (D)(3)(c).
    (a) A non–grounding-type receptacle(s) shall be permitted to be replaced with another non–grounding-type receptacle(s).
    (b) A non–grounding-type receptacle(s) shall be permitted to be replaced with a ground-fault circuit interrupter-type of receptacle(s). These receptacles shall be marked “No Equipment Ground.” An equipment grounding conductor shall not be connected from the ground-fault circuit-interrupter-type receptacle to any outlet supplied from the ground-fault circuit-interrupter receptacle.
    (c) A non–grounding-type receptacle(s) shall be permitted to be replaced with a grounding-type receptacle(s) where supplied through a ground-fault circuit interrupter. Grounding-type receptacles supplied through the ground-fault circuit interrupter shall be marked “GFCI Protected” and “No Equipment Ground.” An equipment grounding conductor shall not be connected between the grounding-type receptacles.

  14. #14

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    Run a new 12-2 circuit to the under sink location. Terminate it in a surface mounted box with a receptacle in it. Run smurf,flex or AC cable to the switch. Install a switch inside the cabinet under the sink so you will need to open the cabinet door to turn the disposal on. Make the switch convenient. Connect the wires so that one half of the receptacle is switched. The other half will be hot all the time so in the future the DW can be plugged into it. I assume your AHJ allows GD/DW sharing of one circuit. My guess is that the DW is also ungrounded. Air switch is an idea but you still have to run the air line and mount it to the wall.(same work as running wires) Also do not know if air switch is legal for a disposal.

  15. #15
    Electrical Contractor/Instructor jwelectric's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ked View Post
    Run a new 12-2 circuit to the under sink location. Terminate it in a surface mounted box with a receptacle in it. Run smurf,flex or AC cable to the switch. Install a switch inside the cabinet under the sink so you will need to open the cabinet door to turn the disposal on. Make the switch convenient. Connect the wires so that one half of the receptacle is switched. The other half will be hot all the time so in the future the DW can be plugged into it. I assume your AHJ allows GD/DW sharing of one circuit. My guess is that the DW is also ungrounded. Air switch is an idea but you still have to run the air line and mount it to the wall.(same work as running wires) Also do not know if air switch is legal for a disposal.
    When making an installation such as this care must be taken to:
    210.23(A)(2) Utilization Equipment Fastened in Place. The total rating of utilization equipment fastened in place, other than luminaires (lighting fixtures), shall not exceed 50 percent of the branch-circuit ampere rating where lighting units, cord-and-plug-connected utilization equipment not fastened in place, or both, are also supplied.

    make sure that neither appliance draws more than 10 amps

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