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Thread: Who is KCPL trying to protect?

  1. #16
    DIY Senior Member BrianJohn's Avatar
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    One does not need to cut the chessy seal to steal electricity. Utilities are stupid about this, there are many instances where QUALIFIED electricians need to pull meters to trouble shoot electrical issues and waiting for a utility employee is a waste of time.

  2. #17

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    If you do some searches on the new there is a tool you can use to get the wire to come out so you can reuse them. I have never tried this but I have seen the web site and seen it done.

    I know when they talk about steeling power there talking about a bit more than 8 amps on and off for a few hours.

  3. #18
    I&C Engineer (mostly WWTP) Lakee911's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob NH
    9. On day of changeover; at 7 AM, cut the old service drop on my side of connectors using a pair of Fiskar pruning loppers with fiberglass handles. This was the only hot work, and not at all hazardous.
    I don't think that isn't hazardous, Bob. I guess you just have more balls than I do.

    Jason

  4. #19
    In the Trades Bob NH's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lakee911
    I don't think that isn't hazardous, Bob. I guess you just have more balls than I do. Jason
    Position during cut and insulated tool kept me well beyond the range of the hot conductor. Knowledge and planning eliminate risk.

  5. #20
    Licensed Electrical Contractor Speedy Petey's Avatar
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    Bob, I respect you, but IMO using a pruning tool to cut a live wire is neither knowledgeable nor well planned out.

    I am a FIRM believer in the right tool for the job.

  6. #21
    DIY scratch-pad engineer leejosepho's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Speedy Petey
    IMO using a [pair of Fiskar pruning loppers with fiberglass handles] to cut a live wire is neither ... the right tool for the job.
    What is wrong about the tool that was used?

  7. #22
    Licensed Electrical Contractor Speedy Petey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by leejosepho
    What is wrong about the tool that was used?
    I truly hope this question was sarcastic.
    Please tell me you forgot to add the little after your post.

  8. #23
    DIY scratch-pad engineer leejosepho's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Speedy Petey
    I truly hope this question was sarcastic.
    No, I truly wonder what you believe was wrong about Bob using these:
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  9. #24
    Licensed Electrical Contractor Speedy Petey's Avatar
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    Wow! No comment.

  10. #25
    Rancher
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    Quote Originally Posted by hj
    The reason being that without the meter, creative types will connect to the hubs with alligator clips and "steal" the electricity, or install their own meter between readings to do the same thing.
    That's way too much work, just turn the meter upside down, they used to run backwards, not sure if they still do or not...

    Rancher

  11. #26
    Rancher
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    Fiberglass tree limb loppers is exactly what it looked like to me when I had the electric company change my meter location, they did it all live, and did crimp connectors, and all for an underground fed panel. They did have gloves on also.

    They were probably more expensive loppers...

    Rancher

  12. #27
    DIY Senior Member BrianJohn's Avatar
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    THE BIG DIFFERENCE. Cable cutters are designed and tested for the purpose, I DOUBT the trimmers were tested and DEFINENTLY not designed for the purpose. They could have had metal reinforcing rods in the handle, for one.

  13. #28
    Rancher
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrianJohn
    They could have had metal reinforcing rods in the handle, for one.
    Yes they could have... I've never seen them like that, but it's possible.

    I agree you should use the correct tool for the job, but don't go overboard.

    Rancher

  14. #29
    DIY scratch-pad engineer leejosepho's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrianJohn
    THE BIG DIFFERENCE. Cable cutters are designed and tested for the purpose, I DOUBT the trimmers were tested and DEFINENTLY not designed for the purpose. They could have had metal reinforcing rods in the handle, for one.
    To say that pruning tool was not "designed" (intended) for cutting live wires is certainly correct, but given the physical capabilities of the tool and its known-potential use for cutting branches away from live wires, it would be impossible for me to believe the manufacturer did not make absolutely sure those handles were not conductive and that Bob did not know they were completely safe.

    Who decides what is the right or correct tool for any job?

    Some folks learn (the hard way) by trial and error.
    Some folks (the teachable ones) learn from others.
    Some folks assume manufacturers and/or testing labs know best.
    Some folks gain experience from any and/or all of the above and, with knowledge and planning, are ultimately able to decide for themselves.

    Have you ever seen a 7-1/4" carbide-tip saw blade mounted backwards on a 4" grinder? I hope not. Nevertheless, I had a certain job to do a few weeks ago ... and that combination was definitely the right/correct tool to use for that specific job on that day, but only *after* I had spent about an hour just holding it (unplugged) and going over every bit of possible trouble I could bring to mind (knowledge) and how to do what needed to be done without getting hurt (planning).

    Have you ever seen a welder used to remove a bearing cone from inside a hub?

    Truly, there is no better tool for doing *that* job!

    Correctness and/or rightness of tools is occasionally subjective.
    Last edited by leejosepho; 10-15-2007 at 07:16 PM.

  15. #30
    Licensed Electrical Contractor Speedy Petey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by leejosepho
    Correctness and/or rightness of tools is occasionally subjective.
    Maybe so....but NOT in this case.

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