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Thread: Help!! He wants to run the vent into the attic...doesn't seem right to me...

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    Default Help!! He wants to run the vent into the attic...doesn't seem right to me...

    Ok, I hate to just jump in and post out of desperation but our plumber is here working right now!!

    We are moving our master bathroom (along with the plumbing of course), drain and water lines seem to be an easy move but the issue is with the vents. I don't know much (OK, anything) but it doesn't seem right to vent right into the attic. It is a walk in attic (used for storage) with venting in the soffit and also a ventilation fan.

    Don't the vents have to go through the roof? Doesn't smelly gas come out of the vent? Is it normal to have a vent on the front of the house or is that just a matter of preference? Can vents go to the side wall of a house (that was his other option for the toilet vent, the sink is running smack dab in the center of the attic)?

    TIA!!

  2. #2
    Plumbing Designer FloridaOrange's Avatar
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    The vent needs to exit the building. Usually through the roof, sometimes as a sidewall vent given certain conditions and if your local code allows. Where are you located?. Never vent into the attic, ever!!!
    Matt
    Semi-professional plumbing designer
    Enjoying life in SW Florida

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    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    That holds true for the fan exhaust vent as well..not a good idea to exhaust humid air into the attic where it can condense and feed mold and rot.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

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    We are near Charlotte NC. I guess I need to find out what the code requires. UGH!!

    All the space above the new bathroom is attic, two walls are exterior and one other is load bearing. The 4th wall is the one sitting under the middle section of the attic and we think it may be load bearing as well.

    So the proposed vent could be extended to the roof...but it is a poor location right in the middle of the attic. Can a vent have a horizontal portion running between joists?

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    In the Trades Gary Swart's Avatar
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    That's something even a hack handyman should know! I have to wonder about your "plumber's" credentials! I not an expert on all plumbing codes, but I can't imagine that this would pass any local codes in the US or Canada. I would be very suspicious of the rest of the work he has done for you. Certainly have it checked by a licensed plumber or an inspector prior to covering anything.

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    Plumbing Designer FloridaOrange's Avatar
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    Your vent can run horizontal with a continuous slope.

    Do you know this plumber well, or use him often. Your intitial question would lead me to not have any more work done by this plumber. Vent termination is a pretty straight forward affair. If this isn't done right, what else isn't done right?

    Good luck.
    Matt
    Semi-professional plumbing designer
    Enjoying life in SW Florida

  7. #7

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    Jim, we have already re-run the exhaust vents in two other bathrooms....they had been vented right into the insulation...but plumbing is something we don't have the knowledge or experience to do ourselves so we hire it out. Now I am wishing we had enough knowledge so we would know what was going on. But hey, isn't a plumber supposed to know this stuff?

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    Plumbing Designer FloridaOrange's Avatar
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    A plumber should know his stuff otherwise he's a hack.
    Running exhaust vents into your attic could create problems down the road with mold. Think of it, an exhaust vent running while the shower is on is drawing moist air and dumping it into your attic.
    Matt
    Semi-professional plumbing designer
    Enjoying life in SW Florida

  9. #9

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    He has done some other work for us...fairly simple things.
    DH is on his way home now to see where the proposed vents will be going. Perhaps I misunderstood and he intends to extend them to the roof but he didn't say so. Either way...a vent sticking up the middle of the attic isn't ideal....just not sure what the options are.

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    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    It needs to have slope like a drain in case it gets condensation or rain accumulations in it, so once it is above the ceiling, you have the depth of the joist to run it before it is in the way. Now, depending on which way the joists run, that could be along ways. The vents for all of the fixtures can be combined somewhere in the attic and only one penetration through the roof is required, though.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

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    DIY Senior Member molo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chocochip
    He has done some other work for us...fairly simple things.
    DH is on his way home now to see where the proposed vents will be going. Perhaps I misunderstood and he intends to extend them to the roof but he didn't say so. Either way...a vent sticking up the middle of the attic isn't ideal....just not sure what the options are.
    Ask him where they will be exiting the roof. You might have misunderstood him. Otherwise ask him for his license.
    "Any American who is prepared to run for President should automatically, by definition, be disqualified from ever doing so."
    Gore Vidal.

  12. #12

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    The joists seem to be running 'the wrong way' to make venting an easy task.


    OK, after looking at it with DH it seems we have some options. Done properly, it is allowable to side vent. We will ask him to run the vent at the other sink that is closer to the outside wall. The vent will come up through the attic and then be side vented but not be in the middle of the attic. We could still go up through the roof but DH is not a fan of having the vents on the front of the house and it would be A LOT of work (if even possible) to run the vents to the back of the house.

    Does that sound better? Do we need a vent from both sinks? Sorry for so many questions but I really don't know much about plumbing.

    BTW...I am not the type to spaz out easily...
    But, I have learned that when something doesn't seem right it is at least worth investigating. ( I will be adding a 'Basics of Plumbing' type book to my Christmas list this year...LOL)

  13. #13
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    IF it is permitted to go out the side wall, you still need to get the top of the pipe up high enough (typically above the peak), so that can look kind of tacky...better to run it out the roof. Each fixture needs a vent, but they can be combined above the flood plane, but it is easier to do above the ceiling (in the attic).
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

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