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Thread: Bit of Hot Water Tank Science

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  1. #1
    DIY Senior Member molo's Avatar
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    Default Bit of Hot Water Tank Science

    How would you figure out if it is cost effective to turn off your water tank for a certain number of days. eg. We have an 82 gallon electric hot water tank. How many days away from home could justify turning it off, and turning it back on to reheat upon returning to the home; 4, 10, 20 days? How would you determine this?

    TIA,
    Molo
    "Any American who is prepared to run for President should automatically, by definition, be disqualified from ever doing so."
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    Commercial Plumber markts30's Avatar
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    It is hard to say...
    Where are you located?
    What time of year is it going to be? (outside temps etc...)
    Do you have other forms of heating that will be left on?
    Is any piping in un-heated/poorly insulated areas?
    If you are going for a while and not planning on heating, are you going to have the house winterized?

    Unless you really need to, I would just turn the temp down to the lowest setting (vacation mode etc) and leave it as is... You should not use too much power doing that....

  3. #3
    DIY Senior Member molo's Avatar
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    The space will be kept 45-50 degrees. The pipes are uninsulated. Cold New York.
    "Any American who is prepared to run for President should automatically, by definition, be disqualified from ever doing so."
    Gore Vidal.

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    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    You need to do an experiment. YOu'll need an accurate thermometer. Right after the burner finishes heating things up, take a small sample of water to determine the starting temp. Turn the burner off so it can't run. Either overnight, or preferably more often, take another small sample to develop a curve of how fast the temp drops (the quality of the insulation). Knowing how many hours it takes to cool off the tank's worth of water, you can figure out how many BTU's it would take to just keep it hot. If you are really lucky, the specs are available on the manufacturer's website, but they often have the tank at a nominal 70-degrees. The bigger the delta between the room temp and the water temp, the faster the thing loses heat.

    You also might get an idea by monitoring how often the burner turns on when there is no useage. This would require knowing and believing the accuracy of the thermostat and its repeatability. Say it allows a 10-degree drop before it turns back on, and it takes 4-hours, with 40-gallons, you can figure out how many BTU's it is losing. 40 gallons * ~8 pounds, * 10-degrees = BTU. Extropolate that for the time it would take to get to the room temp.
    Jim DeBruycker
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    Master Plumber master plumber mark's Avatar
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    Talking depends on how long and how old

    It really depends on how long you are going to be gone and how old the wate heater is...

    All you have to do is shut it down at the breaker
    and it only takes 30 minutes to heat back up anyway...
    when you arrive home.....

    if the heater is old , sometimes just turning it off could
    cause the elements or thermostats not to come back on
    or burn out when it is switched back on.....

    I doubt that the cost of the electricity would be more than one meal out
    while you are on vacation



  6. #6
    DIY Senior Member molo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jadnashua
    The bigger the delta between the room temp and the water temp, the faster the thing loses heat.

    .
    This raises an interesing question. The tank is in an area that stays around 70 during the summer, but in winter gets into the 30-40 range. I've wondered about how to determine how much heat the heater is losing during these cold months. Does anybody have an idea how I can determine this?

    TIA,
    Molo
    "Any American who is prepared to run for President should automatically, by definition, be disqualified from ever doing so."
    Gore Vidal.

  7. #7
    DIY Member theelviscerator's Avatar
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    Just turn it to low heat most have a vacation setting...
    The world is a grindstone, whether it wears you down, or polishes you up, is up to you.

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