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Thread: Rough in

  1. #1

    Default Rough in

    I need some help with rough in. Attached are 2 pics of what I did.

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    There are two 14-2 providing power to 4 switches. I labeled each wire it may be hard to see the labels.
    One of the 14-2 will provide power to 600watt track light switch and an outside 100watt light switch.

    The other 14-2 will provide power to two switches each controlling a 50” ceiling fans.

    The inspector came today and left in 10 secs. He said it is not ready, because the splices are not done.

    I thought “rough in” is just having the correct wire, making sure the wire is stapled to the posts correctly? When I asked him what it means to have the “all the splices done” he said go call an electrician.

    Only thing I can think of that he wants me to remove the rubber sheathing from the NM wires, and splice and wire nut all the grounds and natural together. But since I can’t install any of the switches yet. Do I just leave the black wire alone?

    Any help and suggestion is much appreciated.

  2. #2
    DIY Senior Member Livin4Real's Avatar
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    Is there a particular reason you can't install the switches yet? Also if you won't be using the angle nails go ahead and pull them from the box.

  3. #3
    Jack of all trades frenchie's Avatar
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    How is that box attached?
    Master Plumber Mark:

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  4. #4
    Electrical Contractor jbfan74's Avatar
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    I agree with frenchie.
    If that box has screws going through it in the back, it will not pass anyway.
    What the inspector wants is all the grounds made up, all neturals made up, all the hots, with pigtails made up, and the swithlegs waiting for the switches.
    Yes I am A Pirate-Jimmy Buffett

  5. #5
    In the Trades Bob NH's Avatar
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    I would screw a piece of 2x4 to that stud behind the boards and drive the nails into it to hold the end of the box in position.

    I can't see the numbers but your box should have the volume marked somewhere. You need enough volume for equivalent of 21 wires, 42 cubic inches.
    Last edited by Bob NH; 09-20-2007 at 10:05 AM.

  6. #6
    Electrical Contractor/Instructor jwelectric's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hids2000
    The inspector came today and left in 10 secs. He said it is not ready, because the splices are not done.
    The most important thing here is the equipment grounding conductors and grounded (neutral) conductor.

    All the grounds will be together but the grounded (neutral) conductors must stay with the circuit conductors do not join all them together.

    Once the devices are installed and a cover plate attached these items are no longer visible and would require a good amount of time to inspect on a finial inspection.

    A question concerning the installation of the box;
    Quote Originally Posted by frenchie
    How is that box attached?
    This is a violation of 110.3(B) as well as 314.23(B)(2) and should be rejected. The wall and back of the box are not strong enough to support the box itself.

  7. #7

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    the box i am using is a Carlon Wall Boxes, Nonmetallic Four-Gang
    Model BH464A it holds 64cu" so i got enough space.

    One the right side the box has a flange that goes over the 2x4 post which i nailed with two 3" 10D nails. I didn't nail or screw anything to the back of the box. there is in fact about 1" space between the back of the box and the wall.

    I will build out the left side of the box with 2x4 so i can use those 2 build-in nails and make the box more secure.

    I will take a pic later once do up some of the wires so you guys can tell me if it looks good. I am going to make sure all the ground wires are connected and there are 4 pig tails 6" long each for each of the switches. The Neutrals I will wire nut them together and I will leave the hots alone. Does that sound right?
    thanks guys for the info.
    Last edited by hids2000; 09-20-2007 at 02:25 PM.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Livin4Real
    Is there a particular reason you can't install the switches yet? Also if you won't be using the angle nails go ahead and pull them from the box.

    I thought you can't install the switches until i pass the rough in? If I could install the switches than hack I would.

  9. #9
    Electrical Contractor/Instructor jwelectric's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hids2000
    The Neutrals I will wire nut them together and I will leave the hots alone. Does that sound right?
    thanks guys for the info.
    If you indeed have two circuits
    Quote Originally Posted by hids2000
    There are two 14-2 providing power to 4 switches.
    then all the Neutrals would not go together.

    The neutrals of this circuit
    Quote Originally Posted by hids2000
    One of the 14-2 will provide power to 600watt track light switch and an outside 100watt light switch.
    will go together and the neutrals of this circuit
    Quote Originally Posted by hids2000
    The other 14-2 will provide power to two switches each controlling a 50” ceiling fans.
    will go together.

  10. #10
    DIY Senior Member Livin4Real's Avatar
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    That's a little harsh. At least he's here for help. Everyone starts out knowing nothing, it's those that choose to read and ask questions that learn something. I'm not an electrician, I'm not a plumber. I crunch numbers on 100,000lbs of freight for aircraft and tell people how to load it so it doesn't go down in a ball of flames. I'm also an avid DIY'er that reads and researches and asks questions so I can learn as much as possible, when I can't do something I hire someone. Criticizing people in a non-constructive way just scares them away from asking questions, so the next time they'll just do what they think they should instead of asking the right way to do it for fear of being berated, then end up multiplying the problem, getting hurt or worse.
    I'd step off my soapbox now but I'm vertically challenged and need the height


    Brian
    Last edited by Livin4Real; 09-20-2007 at 11:13 PM.

  11. #11

    Default

    I find it works better to label the cables on the blue box parallel to where they come in with a permanent marker pen-other labels vanish when you splice. I always install switches and temporary light bulbs in the rough so I can make sure everything works and provide light for the workers. But not receptacles. I use some old switches and do not attach them to the boxes, they just are stuffed in there at an angle so the wall can be drywalled. The switches get covered with drywall mud and paint, so they are replaced at finish. I use rubber bulb holders, I call them used car lot bulb sockets, for a single light bulb. I hate having to run new cables to solve mistakes at finish electrical. The inspectors usually say, "At least you know it works!"

  12. #12
    DIY Senior Member Livin4Real's Avatar
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    you can install switches before drywalling, most have the removable tabs that can be broken off with no impact to the switch. The screw mounting holes are still intact after doing so, just the "ears" get snapped off to allow pre-drywall wiring.

  13. #13
    Electrical Contractor jbfan74's Avatar
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    The ears have a purpose!
    They pull the device tight against the drywall so the cover will sit flush and you are not using the cover to hold the switch flush.
    Yes I am A Pirate-Jimmy Buffett

  14. #14
    Electrical Contractor/Instructor jwelectric's Avatar
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    As a code official I will make you remove the switches before I make the rough-in inspection.

    In NC if I catch the interior circuits energized before a CO is issued I will have all power removed.

  15. #15
    In the Trades Bob NH's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jwelectric
    As a code official I will make you remove the switches before I make the rough-in inspection.

    In NC if I catch the interior circuits energized before a CO is issued I will have all power removed.
    What is expected in a remodel where the house is already occupied?

    I did a remodel that included installing a subpanel that served the water heater, dryer, lights, and several outlets. Most but not all of the outlets existed in the original house. The only thing the inspector seemed concerned about was to verify that the neutral in the subpanel was not grounded.
    Last edited by Bob NH; 09-21-2007 at 09:07 AM.

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