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Thread: Ac/dc?

  1. #16
    DIY Member Bassman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by geniescience

    Besides, Bassman, you deserve an answer to your first question. After that, if people want to keep on discussing other things closely related to your question, I won't speak up to disagree.

    David
    I figure I'll get an answer to my question eventually. In the meantime I'm learning some things! I think that for the layman end user the stores call all the above "transformers" even though technically some may be converters, etc. I'm sure when I place an order they'll be happy to sell me the correct thing.

  2. #17
    Electrical Contractor/Instructor jwelectric's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bassman
    I'm sure when I place an order they'll be happy to sell me the correct thing.
    And here-in lies your answer as was given to you here

  3. #18
    Plumber jimbo's Avatar
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    And herein lies the reason for his confusion, and he still doesn't have an answer, but maybe has been given enough information to figure out what he needs:

    [quote=Bassman] I'm purchasing online and the sites carry bothquote]

  4. #19
    DIY Member Bassman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jwelectric
    And here-in lies your answer as was given to you here
    Correct you are. I got an email from the vendor who states that their DC "transformers" are only used, and not often, in very long runs where voltage drop is a real problem. 99.999999999% of the time, AC is called for. That was the answer I was looking for.

  5. #20
    Sound and Light Suppervisor for a School District tjbaudio's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by geniescience
    It (A transformer) keeps AC input as AC, and DC input as DC.

    Another word for rectifier is inverter. A transformer combined with one of these is now a more complex device. Can be called a power supply. Cannot be called a transformer because it alters the type of output waveform, from AC to DC. or from DC to AC.


    David
    Wrong! A transformer will convert Voltage and impedance for AC. If you feed a transformer DC it will block it. Depending on the transformer, circut voltage and power capasity some thing may get damaged. In other cases this blocking propterty is used to advantage.

    An inverter does the oposit of a rectier. A rectifire takes AC and converts it to DC with ripple, filters in a power supply reduce this ripple to sute the application. An inverter takes DC and converts it to AC. This is a complex process.

    A power supply in this case is a unit that takes the main house current and converts it to soem usable form for the system. It will contain a transformer. If it outputs AC that may be it. If it outputs DC there will be a rectifier also. None of this talks about a switch mode supply which is a compleatly different animal and beyond the scope of this conversation other than it can also supply DC current for your system. Recently the cost of complexity of a switch mode unit is offset by the cost of raw materials for a transformer.

  6. #21
    DIY Senior Member BrianJohn's Avatar
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    Maybe he does not understand BUT THE answer was given more than once and VERY CLEARLY.

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