(206) 949-5683, Top Rated Plumber, Seattle
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 21

Thread: Framing question

  1. #1
    DIY Member Bassman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Ventura, CA
    Posts
    94

    Default Framing question

    I just gutted my kitchen and want to know why some of the blocking between the studs is installed at an angle and not straight across? Like this |/|\| only not such a large angle, maybe 25-30 degrees or so. Is it easier to nail that way, or is it stronger? Thanks,
    Neil

  2. #2
    DIY scratch-pad engineer leejosepho's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    200 miles south of Little Rock
    Posts
    2,474

    Default

    If that blocking is at a fairly consistent height along the wall, that angling might have been done to widen the area where cabinetry could be attached.

  3. #3
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    Posts
    25,602

    Default blocking

    They cut all the blocks the same size, and oversize, then angled them however they fit. It was a lazy way to do it and would have caused a "real" framing carpenter to have a heart attack. Or as I asked a plumber one time, (who also happened to be the city plumbing inspector for a neighboring city), "Who installed that water heater?" And when he said, "I did.", I told him to redo it and do it right. At the time I was a third year apprentice.

  4. #4
    DIY Member Bassman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Ventura, CA
    Posts
    94

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by leejosepho
    If that blocking is at a fairly consistent height along the wall, that angling might have been done to widen the area where cabinetry could be attached.
    It's about the height you'd expect a firebreak to be.

  5. #5
    DIY Member Bassman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Ventura, CA
    Posts
    94

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by hj
    They cut all the blocks the same size, and oversize, then angled them however they fit. It was a lazy way to do it and would have caused a "real" framing carpenter to have a heart attack. redo it and do it right.
    Ah, that make perfect sense! No measuring and they will always fit SOMEWHERE.
    Thanks

  6. #6
    G.C. 22+ years(in 3 states) Old Dog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Hawaii
    Posts
    82

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bassman
    Ah, that make perfect sense! No measuring and they will always fit SOMEWHERE.
    Thanks
    Are the blocks straight cut or angle cut on the ends?Straight cut=lazy/ hack framer...

  7. #7
    DIY Member Bassman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Ventura, CA
    Posts
    94

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Old Dog
    Are the blocks straight cut or angle cut on the ends?Straight cut=lazy/ hack framer...
    Angled. How is straight a lazier way to do it? Seems like you'd have to be dead on for all the straight pieces to line up. These houses in my area went up in a hurry, that's for certain.

  8. #8
    G.C. 22+ years(in 3 states) Old Dog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Hawaii
    Posts
    82

    Smile blocking...

    Have to see a picture of it but if they cut both ends on an angle they did it for a reason.As another poster said if they are straight cut and random length they were being lazy.A good inspector would of caught that during the framing stage.I have seen blocking done on angles in cabinet areas before.Are the 2x4's nailed on the edge or with the wide face out?Wide face out would indicate they wanted more area to fasten to.THey could of done it that way if they had to do a drywall repair for some reason and needed "dead wood" to fasten to.
    Fire blocking normally is horizontal staggered every other stud bay the thickness of a 2x4 so they can be nailed.Some framers "toenail" them in keeping them even all the way across. Many years ago had a inspector in Ca. give me a hard time for doing it that way...

  9. #9
    DIY Member Bassman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Ventura, CA
    Posts
    94

    Default

    Here's a photo. Those outside studs aren't really bowed, it's the camera lens. So the correct way is to have them straight across and staggered so you can nail directly into the end?

  10. #10
    DIY scratch-pad engineer leejosepho's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    200 miles south of Little Rock
    Posts
    2,474

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bassman
    Here's a photo ...
    Whew! Somebody sure made a lot of extra effort to cut and fit those so nicely ... and I still wonder why.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bassman
    So the correct way is to have them straight across and staggered so you can nail directly into the end?
    That would be my own preference in order to avoid toe-nailing.

  11. #11
    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Bothell, Washington
    Posts
    14,191
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    I notice that it's bowing out the stud to the left.

  12. #12
    DIY Member Bassman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Ventura, CA
    Posts
    94

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Terry
    I notice that it's bowing out the stud to the left.
    That's just a trick of the camera lens, it's straight.

  13. #13
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    Posts
    25,602

    Default fireblocking

    Fireblocking can be anywhere as long as it makes a cavity 8' long or less. I usually put mine down low where I can reach it without a ladder, although some like it 8' high for some reason. One old time framer got all bent out of shape when the blocking was offset. He wanted it straight across, (but also 8' high).

  14. #14
    Rancher
    Guest

    Default

    I thought it was 10' or less?

    Rancher

  15. #15
    G.C. 22+ years(in 3 states) Old Dog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Hawaii
    Posts
    82

    Smile Framing question...

    Hey Bassman,
    I was looking thru one of my old Audel carpentry books My dad gave me from the 1950's today...It shows that type of angled draft/fire stop in framing details.I quote from the book about bracing and firestopping:"Angle of bracing and intermediate firestopping between floor levels should not be less than 15 degrees nor more than 30 degrees from the horizontal."
    Must of had an "old school" carpenter on your house...
    Last edited by Old Dog; 09-25-2007 at 12:34 AM.

    Quality is never an accident.It is always the result of intelligent effort. (John Ruskin)

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •