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Thread: Another Framing Question

  1. #1
    DIY Member nursedoe's Avatar
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    Default Another Framing Question

    As long as the darn tub is back out, I thought I would work on getting the insulation and framing straight on the wall behind the tub. That wall has been framed "on the flat". However, the new tub is narrower and will allow traditional framing. This sounds better to me because I can then put in a shampoo nitche on the long wall.

    I was reading the thread on blocking in which the cross pieces were all angled and carefull fitted into place. I am not up for any thing so darn tricky. I have been looking online for some guidelines on putting in the cross pieces, but without luck. I know the new studs should be 16 on center, right?

    How many cross pieces should each space have?

    nursedoe

  2. #2
    Jack of all trades frenchie's Avatar
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    Each stud cavity gets one, roughly half-way up. It's just there to break up the space - in case of fire, the flames can't travel all the way up - and to prevent the studs from bowing/twisting/warping.
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  3. #3
    DIY Member nursedoe's Avatar
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    Thanks Frenchie.

    I was reading about the fire blocking and it didn't make sense to me. Now it does. I didn't know that about fire. There were NO books at Home Depot about framing.

    Tomorrow is a new day. Home Depot exchanged the tub without a question.

    I bought some metal things to hold the new studs in place nice and straight. I am looking forward to getting this done before I collect social security.... Still looking for the pony

  4. #4
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    Default blocking

    The location of the blocking is immaterial as long as it keeps any vertical space less than 8' long. Some framers prefer to put it at the top of the cavity near the ceiling.

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    DIY Member nursedoe's Avatar
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    I want to try to put some cross pieces where I might put a grab bar. I think that they are so ugly, as are soap dishes, but I guess those are good things to have.

    I wanted just a shampoo nitche since I shower all the time and take a bath like almost never. I didn't even buy a soap thing with that grab handle because I think they are ugly, and who uses bar soap anymore? I think that I should put one in anyway. To keep with that whole universal thing.

    You guys are the bomb. You all have a way of explaining things in lay language. Terry should gather some of the posts together and publish an understandable diy book.

    nursedoe

  6. #6

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    The cross memebers that you put in to mount a grab handle should be installed on their face. Makes it easier to find in the wall.

    Just an opinion, if you have a shampoo nook you might as well also add a soap nook. Just a narrow nook to hold soap and razors.

    Tom

  7. #7
    DIY Member nursedoe's Avatar
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    I think I give up on the shampoo nitche. My mom sometimes uses my shower to I have to put in a grad bar. I tried to put the nook in the middle, but the bar is in the way. Then at the left of the long wall ( right sided tub), but it seemed wierd- Off balance. I bought some corner shampoo dishes from dal-tile and I will see how I think they will look.

    Right now I hate the guy who did my addition. Nothing ever is square or plumb. So, as a beginner, I spend so much time making sure studs are as straight as I can make them, within a hair of level in every direction. Then, of course, it is not even close to the adjoining wall, which is a bit bowed. Roar! I know that I am going to leave a note inside the wall in a zip lock bag, explaining to the next person that I had to work with what was there.

    You guys might laugh, it took my about eight hours to knock down four studs and replace them. I am putting up the dry wall, the paperless, mold resisitant, fiber glass ridden stuff on the wall today, insulation and water barrier. It could happen. And the TUB back in!

    1. I learned that when you buy the wood, you need to make sure it is straight.
    2. I learned if you are going to use those metal hangers to join /brace the studs to the top pieces, then you should nail them on the floor.
    3. And If you open the bathroom window and put a trash under there it is much easier than four hundred trips out of the side door ( a tip from my six year old grandson).
    4. No matter how many times I cut those cross pieces, they are always an eight too long or too short . Learn to take into account the width of the chop saw blade.

  8. #8
    Engineer Furd's Avatar
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    ...and who uses bar soap anymore?

    I do.
    Right now I hate the guy who did my addition. Nothing ever is square or plumb.

    It may have been when built. Wood has a tendency to keep moving long after it is nailed in place.
    You guys might laugh, it took my about eight hours to knock down four studs and replace them.

    I'm not laughing. Re-work ALWAYS takes much longer than new construction. I like the estimation plan for DIYers (I'm one) that states, "Whatever amount of time you think it might take, multiply by three and if you're lucky you may come close to completing in that time."
    No matter how many times I cut those cross pieces, they are always an eight too long or too short .

    Yup! I find that I can measure ten times and cut fourteen times and it always ends up too short. As a friend told me, "That's what wood dough and molding is for."

    One more thing: If you add the structural members (I used 2x6's) to the wall for the attachment of grab bars be sure to make measurements from a non-moving point to the near and far outer edges of that member. I didn't and now I have to hope that my studfinder will find the edges or else some demo work will be involved.
    Last edited by Furd; 09-17-2007 at 02:54 PM.

  9. #9
    DIY Member nursedoe's Avatar
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    Yes, rework takes so much longer. Today, I was thinking that if were to continue to replace every out of plumb stud, I would be rebuilding my house. I think California earth quakes may contribute to some movement.

    Now, when the new bathtub was in, I measure like eight times and it was just shy of 4 inches to the tub flange. The size of a 2x4. I suddenly got this creepy feeling that the tub might not fit by like a quarter inch. I won't know for certain until I put it in there.

    I have the insulation in. Hurray! Next, I found some self leveling cement (in the over crowded craft turned tool closet) that I will use to cover the bare dirt left under the tub. The other drain/pipe was thick old brass and was buried in cement. This cheapo plastic one says not to bury it in cement, so I will just make sure all the dirt is covered, so scary things don't crawl in the house

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by nursedoe
    Now, when the new bathtub was in, I measure like eight times and it was just shy of 4 inches to the tub flange. The size of a 2x4. I suddenly got this creepy feeling that the tub might not fit by like a quarter inch. I won't know for certain until I put it in there.
    Nurse,

    Make sure it will fit now. Don't wait till later. Make sure you check along the wall and along the opening to the enclosure.

    Do you have a nail gun? It will make framing and lots of other things much easier and quicker. I also feel it provides a better joint.

    Would you consider just furring out the studs as opposed to replacing them. All studs move especially new ones. I framed my house over the course of a month and there would be several studs that would just bow out so badly that I'd have to replace them. This is in the span of a month. Those old studs are likely stiff and strong from age and shouldn't move too much more. Your new wood is going to move.

    Good Luck

    Tom

  11. #11
    DIY Member nursedoe's Avatar
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    Dear Tom,

    A nail gun in on my Christmas wish list. Old fashioned hammer and nails for me. I don't know what "furring" is. The old studs had some water damage too. when I would pull out nails, it would just "smoosh" and fall apart.

    The wall is up, and the drywall is screwed in on the opposite side. Insulation is up. Now, for the tub. It is Americast, so not super heavy. The plumber was able to pick it up himself. We have established that I am no plumber.

    I can open the box, slide it on a blanket or skateboard, the drag it in the room. I think I can put some sort of skids. In the hospital, we use a sliding board to move heavy patients from gurney to bed and back.

    The new box actually has directions, so I will use the measurements in there to see if it is close b4 I break my neck.

    I still want to cover that bare dirt with cement so creepy things don't come in the house. We don't have roaches here in the desert, but some roach like bugs were dead in the wall. I don't want those big water bugs to crawl in.

    Thanks for the advice. I will look up "furring".

  12. #12

    Default

    Furring is placing large shims that you cut from a 2x4 typically on a table saw. Instead of ripping out the bowed studs you simply furr the shallow ones out to meet the bow'd ones.

    Obviously if you have one 2x4 that is the culprit you'd just remove it. Sometimes when there are lots of bad boards furring is a good option.

    Be nice and santa just might bring you a nail gun and suitable compressor.

    Tom

    P.S. Another option is using drywall shims, which are long pieces of cardboard.

  13. #13
    DIY Member nursedoe's Avatar
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    I was actually looking at compressors. I realize that part of the problem when I am remodeling is lack of physical strength. You guys hammer in a 2.5 inch nail in three or four swings and I am still there on swinging away 10 strikes later. Proper tools are very important.

    That is why the stall on thinking about the very necessary remodel on the other bathroom. I am not willing for the next job to take this long. The next time, there will be much better planning. MUCH more realistic as to what I can hope to accomplish as a weekend warrior.

  14. #14

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    A hammer and a nail is safer. So if you do get into a nail gun be very careful. You may want to go through some mental exercise before you fire every nail.

    I do and I've fired over 10,000 nails.

    Tom

  15. #15
    DIY Member nursedoe's Avatar
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    I bought an electric staple/brad gun this week and found it pretty scary at first. Baby steps. I love my Dremel but the Roto-Zip is scarier. I did eventually get the nerve to use it and it gets less scary with practice. I think I really want a table saw set up next. I have a huge, I mean really big, band saw with what looks like a planer (sp) built in that I should get rid get rid of. I don't plan on opening a lumber mill anytime soon.

    The most expensive part of diy is the cost of proper tools. Isn't it interesting that the most sturdy buildings made hundreds of use ago we made without any power tools? [IMG][/IMG]

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