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Thread: Eucalyptus Tree

  1. #1
    DIY Senior Member Mike50's Avatar
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    Default Eucalyptus Tree


    I planted a young silver dollar Eucalyptus (Polyanthemos) in early July.
    It's doing well and has already grown a foot and is almost 2 foot high. It came staked.

    I have read in a number of places that it is preffered to NOT stake them.
    They are very wind resistant.
    any thoughts on this..?

    Mike
    Last edited by Terry; 09-22-2007 at 08:49 AM.

  2. #2
    Homeowner geniescience's Avatar
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    staking is a crutch. Necessary at times, but then it can cause the opposite problem in which the plant's woody stem tissue does not get strong enough to handle life's stresses on its own. Since it never had to before, why should it now?

    When you lower the height of the rubber loop around the plant, you are letting more wind stress the trunk at mid height.

    Your call. When you remove the stake.

    David

  3. #3
    DIY Senior Member Mike50's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by geniescience
    staking is a crutch. Necessary at times, but then it can cause the opposite problem in which the plant's woody stem tissue does not get strong enough to handle life's stresses on its own. Since it never had to before, why should it now?

    When you lower the height of the rubber loop around the plant, you are letting more wind stress the trunk at mid height.

    Your call. When you remove the stake.

    David
    I think you are correct. It will have outgrown this small stake pretty soon.
    I probably shouldn't replace it.
    Wind was the concern as it's very young.

    My neighbor had a 75 foot Eucalyptus tree felled a couple years ago from a high desert wind gust.

    Mike
    Last edited by Mike50; 09-05-2007 at 11:02 AM.

  4. #4
    DIY Senior Member Mike50's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by geniescience
    staking is a crutch. Necessary at times, but then it can cause the opposite problem in which the plant's woody stem tissue does not get strong enough to handle life's stresses on its own. Since it never had to before, why should it now?

    When you lower the height of the rubber loop around the plant, you are letting more wind stress the trunk at mid height.

    Your call. When you remove the stake.

    David
    As it turned out we experienced some typical fall devil winds up here which blew out the small stake so I restaked it and all is well.
    Thanks for the pic Terry.

    Mike

  5. #5
    Plumber jimbo's Avatar
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    The general theory is that there are no stakes in mother nature, so a tree should be capable of growing without one. Since we are growing trees in pots, transplanting them, etc. sometimes they need a little help. As I understand the ideal staking, it is two poles, spaced some distance from the tree, and connected with very strecthy rubber ties. The tree needs to be able to do a lot of normal flexing to build its "muscles". The stake prevents disasters to a young tree, and should be removed. Check with an arborist, but I think I have read that trees should be staked for not more than a year. Not sure on that one, so check on it.

  6. #6
    DIY Senior Member Mike50's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jimbo
    The general theory is that there are no stakes in mother nature, so a tree should be capable of growing without one. Since we are growing trees in pots, transplanting them, etc. sometimes they need a little help. As I understand the ideal staking, it is two poles, spaced some distance from the tree, and connected with very strecthy rubber ties. The tree needs to be able to do a lot of normal flexing to build its "muscles". The stake prevents disasters to a young tree, and should be removed. Check with an arborist, but I think I have read that trees should be staked for not more than a year. Not sure on that one, so check on it.
    I think you nailed it Jim. Mine is staked very loose with lots of play.(first year)
    By next summer I will unstake it.

    They grow wild in huge groves in Australia where they can lean on each other.

    Mike

  7. #7
    DIY Senior Member Mike50's Avatar
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    Default experience with young trees in winter....?

    I would like to protect the tree from wind and cold over the winter.
    I saw a photo of a triangle shaped barrier made from thick plastic sheeting and 3 rods of rebar
    in an australian eucalyptus grove. It surrounds the tree with a foot clearance-- sides protected with top open.

    Anyone have an alternative idea for a soon to be 5 foot tree.....?

    This variety is cold hardy---but Ive seen cold damage locally on young trees.

    Mike

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