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Thread: What's the secret to no leak the first time?

  1. #16
    Senior Robin Hood Guy Ian Gills's Avatar
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    Yep, let it leak then tighten. I do this with all compression fittings now. And what a shame it's a brass craft gate valve. I would have had a ball valve on there whilst I was fitting the supply.

  2. #17
    Licensed Grump GrumpyPlumber's Avatar
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    Frenchie, Chrome plated tubing with compression is the problem, not copper or poly.
    One of the first things I was taught was to teflon the ferrule on compression that goes around chrome by an oldtimer.
    Copper is never a problem.
    Make note of it when you do a chrome riser, do it without teflon and watch.
    "The biggest regrets we have in life are the chances we never took."

  3. #18
    Licensed Grump GrumpyPlumber's Avatar
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    Also, sizing/cutting the tubing is simple, loosely connect the top so the lower part swings with a small amount of push (on faucets make sure the tube doesn't angle into the top diagonally once shaped), hand tighten on toilets so it doesn't move back and forth but still rotates, bend as needed to locate it immediately next to the valve.
    Mark with a fine sharpie about 1/4" below the port without the nut on it, remove it, then cut.
    Put the bottom in first, there should be a slight bit of play up and down so you can move it into position to the top without bending it too much, loosely tighten the 3/8" nut, completely tighten the top nut with trusty basin wrench, then fully tighten the 3/8" at the bottom.
    On a toilet it's obviously much easier to position with the flat seal on the toilet side as long as the 3/8" nut is semi loose, just make dam sure you tighten the toilet side first, that seal has to be tight and the 3/8" below should have some play.
    OR, get flexible connecters for a few more bucks and don't horrify the customer with all the grunts n groans.
    "The biggest regrets we have in life are the chances we never took."

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