(206) 949-5683, Top Rated Plumber, Seattle
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 19

Thread: Drain lines THROUGH joists?

  1. #1
    DIY Senior Member Nate R's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Milwaukee, WI
    Posts
    472

    Default Drain lines THROUGH joists?

    I will have to run my new tub drain in our 2nd floor bathroom through the joists. The kitchen had a low (Less than 8 feet) ceiling to begin with, and the sistering that we recently did with larger lumber took even more headroom away, so I can't run the drain line below them.

    So I have to go through. Knowing this would probably be the case, I double sistered the joists when I did them to make sure I didn't lose too much strength.


    So, is there an easy way to run drain lines through joists, or will I have a coupling between every joist with little lengths of pipe in between?

  2. #2
    DIY scratch-pad engineer leejosepho's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    200 miles south of Little Rock
    Posts
    2,474

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by motosliders
    ... is there an easy way to run drain lines through joists, or will I have a coupling between every joist with little lengths of pipe in between?
    I doubt you could even get 16" pieces of drain pipe between joists and into right-sized holes, and even if you could, it seems you would end up with many potential blockage points at the couplings along the way.

    I would look for either a way to go over to a wall and down or to even come in through an outside wall.

  3. #3
    Homeowner geniescience's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    humid summers hot, humid winters cold
    Posts
    2,152

    Default

    remember to slope the run.

    How many joists?

    -david

  4. #4
    Master Plumber master plumber mark's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    indianapolis indiana - land of the free, home of the brave....
    Posts
    4,244
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default joysts and couplings

    if their is no other way to do it, then you must
    use couplings ...


    we have run into this many times when the builder was
    such a cheap ass that he would not lower the ceiling
    or giv e us a bulkhead over the kitchen area in the home...

    its no big deal, its just more labor intence..

    cut your pipes straight with a chop saw if possible
    and just lay the glue on extra thick inside the
    fitting and on the male pipe too...

    you wont ever have a problem

  5. #5
    Jack of all trades frenchie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Brooklyn, NY and Fire Island, NY
    Posts
    1,244

    Default

    Nothing strikes fear, in the heart of a carpenter, quite so much as the plumber walking by carrying a sawzall...

    Jokes aside, as long as the holes aren't too big (1/4 of the joist depth), and aren't too close to the top or the bottom of the joists (stick to the middle 1/3 of the joist depth), and aren't anywhere in the middle 1/3 of the span... running pipes through joists is pretty common.

    Of course, the easy way is to run it parallell to the joists, and down a different wall.
    Master Plumber Mark:

    there is nothing better than the
    manly smell of WD 40 in the air
    while banging away on brass with a chisel and hammer...

    it smells like......victory......

    do not hit your thumb...
    __________________
    Just so everyone's clear: I'm the POODLE in the picture ("french", get it?) The hot woman is my wife.

  6. #6
    DIY Senior Member Nate R's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Milwaukee, WI
    Posts
    472

    Default

    I don't have a basement, and my crawlspace is literally about 4 inches, so I can't go down a different wall and then over to the stack.

    I've had 2 plumbers in to look at my situation and give me estimates on a few things. One had a possible alternative, but it was quite complex and involved. (Wanted to move a closet elbow in the stack lower and even then having enough slope was questionable without lowering the ceiling somehow.) The other agreed on going through the joists, but only if they were sistered with larger ones, which was in the plans anyway.

    It will be going through 3 joists.

    Ian: a home inspector won't see it. It will be enclosed by the ceiling below it.

    Mark: Thanks for the tip! I'll definitely use a chop saw to cut the pipes. What kind of blade works well on PVC? I would think the fiber blades for metal would just melt it? A fine toothed wood blade?

  7. #7
    G.C. 22+ years(in 3 states) Old Dog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Hawaii
    Posts
    82

    Default joist cutting...

    Quote Originally Posted by frenchie
    Nothing strikes fear, in the heart of a carpenter, quite so much as the plumber walking by carrying a sawzall...

    Jokes aside, as long as the holes aren't too big (1/4 of the joist depth), and aren't too close to the top or the bottom of the joists (stick to the middle 1/3 of the joist depth), and aren't anywhere in the middle 1/3 of the span... running pipes through joists is pretty common.

    Of course, the easy way is to run it parallell to the joists, and down a different wall.
    Except maybe a chainsaw...

    You didn't mention the size of the floor joist.That will determine the size of the hole you can cut out of the joist.Your cutting a waste line size hole out of each joist.That would make me nervous.Inspectors give us a hard time when we have to cut one or two joists.Not to say I haven't done it but it would be worth a call to your inspector to make sure he's not going to red flag your project over it. Better to know now than have problems later...

  8. #8
    DIY Senior Member Nate R's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Milwaukee, WI
    Posts
    472

    Default

    Will do.

    It's sortof a 2X8 joist. The smallest LVL I could get around here was 9.5" tall. I had to rip it down, but IIRC, I ripped it to 8 REAL inches (I'll have to check.) With just a 1.5" tub drain (So a 2" hole) in that I should be OK.

    in another joist is why I decided to sister.)

    Thanks everyone!

  9. #9
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    21,412

    Default

    The most critical things about cutting joists are the size and location of the hole. If you cut the top or bottom (notch it), you've decreased the strength significantly more than if you bore a hole through the middle of one. Do you know where the holes would need to go? You may need or want some strucural steel reinforcement plates on the joists.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  10. #10
    DIY scratch-pad engineer leejosepho's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    200 miles south of Little Rock
    Posts
    2,474

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by motosliders
    It will be going through 3 joists.
    You will be fine. I had imagined a ten-foot-plus run. A 2" hole in a 2x8 joist is less than 30% of its height, and you can put that hole anywhere along the length of the joist as long as you stay within the center third of its height, as Frenchie mentioned. The top and bottom thirds of the joist do the work, and the center third simply keeps the others in proper relation to each other.

  11. #11
    Homeowner geniescience's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    humid summers hot, humid winters cold
    Posts
    2,152

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by motosliders
    ...a 1.5" tub drain (So a 2" hole)
    drill 1.5", not bigger. 1.675" if you wish. Don't go up to 2"; no need for that. Later, when one of the three isn't lined up well enough, you can ream it out a bit., after you test first without the couplings.

    If you're crossing the joists at a 90 degree angle, you "weaken" all three joists in the same place, and thus you weaken the subfloor along a line, an axis, a place where deflection is more likely to cause a little crack or squeak, etc...

    If you can arrange for the pipe to cross the joists at an angle, the line of weakness has been shifted and its effect reduced to some extent. I'd not be afraid of drilling at angle. (I have done it, too). It is easy to drill a hole at an angle - description of how to do this can be given if you need it.

    Remember that each hole has to be lower in line. More or less 1/4". Within a range; it's not a big concern. You don't need to have larger holes for that.

    Are you using copper or plstic pipe?


    david

  12. #12
    Consultant cwhyu2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Cincinnati OH
    Posts
    1,330

    Default

    I had situation a couple of times and lag bolteb 1/8" steel to plates to the
    joists with cut outs for the pipe and cut to fit the joist width.Length of plate
    16".

  13. #13
    Licensed Grump GrumpyPlumber's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Licensed Grump
    Posts
    1,404

    Default

    In my state the rule is this:
    NO more the one third the joists width for the size of the hole.
    No less than 2" inches of wood above or below the hole to be drilled.
    No notching in the middle third of the overall length from load bearing end, NO notches to exceed 1/5th the joist width.
    You'll want to check local codes on this.
    You might recall seeing older homes with floors that sag or bow, this is because years ago notching/drilling weren't scrutinized.
    "The biggest regrets we have in life are the chances we never took."

  14. #14
    Jack of all trades frenchie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Brooklyn, NY and Fire Island, NY
    Posts
    1,244

    Default

    Genie, I think he'll be okay with 2" holes, he's got every joist double-sistered with LVLs... talk about overkill. And a 2" hole in an 8" joist is within limits, anyways.

    Grumpy, it's 1/6th for notches, under NYS codes. I left it out because notches are kind of off-topic...

    Motoslider - Just try not to wind up with anything like the first pic... (plumbers with a sawzall, I tell you, there ought to be a law...)

    oops, that's sideways.


    the 2nd pic is what you want.
    Attached Images Attached Images   
    Master Plumber Mark:

    there is nothing better than the
    manly smell of WD 40 in the air
    while banging away on brass with a chisel and hammer...

    it smells like......victory......

    do not hit your thumb...
    __________________
    Just so everyone's clear: I'm the POODLE in the picture ("french", get it?) The hot woman is my wife.

  15. #15
    Licensed Grump GrumpyPlumber's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Licensed Grump
    Posts
    1,404

    Default

    Frenchie...I'm pretty sure it's 1/5th here.
    However, if the yankee's get ahead of the Sox I'll give it to ya.
    I just threw it all in the mix because it's all relative when working joists.
    One last thing, Damon sucks!
    "The biggest regrets we have in life are the chances we never took."

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •