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Thread: Disconnect for water heater??

  1. #1
    DIY Member hammerslammer's Avatar
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    Default Disconnect for water heater??

    I'm moving my water heater and I guess i will need a disconnect at the new location. So i'm thinking a metal box with a double pole single throw 30 amp switch will do. Am I close?? Thanks!!

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    Licensed Electrical Contractor Speedy Petey's Avatar
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    NO! Expensive and more work.
    Use a plain 60A non-fused "pull-out" type disconnect. The type used for A/C installations. They are fully self contained and run about 10 bucks.

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    Electrical Contractor/Instructor jwelectric's Avatar
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    Default

    Or

    Use a lock out on the breaket for about $2

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    Electrician Chris75's Avatar
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    Or

    Maybe he's moving the heater next to the panel so he would not even need a separate disconnect...

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    DIY Member hammerslammer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris75
    Or

    Maybe he's moving the heater next to the panel so he would not even need a separate disconnect...
    No it will be a good ways from the panel. I was checking out the disconnects that Speedy mentioned at the depot and they look like a pretty good deal . They had a 30 amp and a 60. I guess the 60 is recomended because the breaker will be 30a.?? Thanks for the replys.

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    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    By definition, it would seem that if you have a 30A breaker, the disconnect would need to be rated for at least 30A; I think the 60A isn't needed. If I understand this, it's sort of like sizing the wiring, you can't use less than 12g on a 20A circuit, but 10g would be overkill...why spend the money unless you have a very long run.
    Jim DeBruycker
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    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

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    Electrician Chris75's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jadnashua
    By definition, it would seem that if you have a 30A breaker, the disconnect would need to be rated for at least 30A; I think the 60A isn't needed. If I understand this, it's sort of like sizing the wiring, you can't use less than 12g on a 20A circuit, but 10g would be overkill...why spend the money unless you have a very long run.

    60 amp disconnect is a pretty common thing you will find in a home center, and cheaper than a 30 amp...

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    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    Sounds like a plan, then. I was just figuring the 30A would be cheaper, and was all that was required. Must be a volume thing...
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

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    Electrician Chris75's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jadnashua
    Sounds like a plan, then. I was just figuring the 30A would be cheaper, and was all that was required. Must be a volume thing...

    Yep... Not really even sure why they make a 30a...

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    Consultant cwhyu2's Avatar
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    I would run 10/3wground from your main panel ,install new 30 amp brkr
    unless you need to upgrade your service and panel.

  11. #11
    Licensed Electrical Contractor Speedy Petey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cwhyu2
    I would run 10/3wground from your main panel ,install new 30 amp brkr
    unless you need to upgrade your service and panel.
    I'm not sure what this has to do with the original question about needing a disconnect.

    Also, 10/3 is NOT needed for a water heater. 10/2 is perfect and typical for this installation.
    Using 10/3 is basically wasteful.

  12. #12
    DIY Member hammerslammer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Speedy Petey
    I'm not sure what this has to do with the original question about needing a disconnect.

    Also, 10/3 is NOT needed for a water heater. 10/2 is perfect and typical for this installation.
    Using 10/3 is basically wasteful.
    How about the idea that (smart) water heaters of the future might requie a neutral?? Just remembering the days when we ran 10-2 for dryers....

    I did price out a roll of 10-2 and 10-3 the other day. More than a water heater.

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    In the Trades Bob NH's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hammerslammer
    How about the idea that (smart) water heaters of the future might requie a neutral?? Just remembering the days when we ran 10-2 for dryers....

    I did price out a roll of 10-2 and 10-3 the other day. More than a water heater.
    Anyone that builds a "smart" water heater that requires a neutral or a 120 Volt circuit has proved that he is not smart enough to build a "smart" water heater.

  14. #14
    DIY Member hammerslammer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob NH
    Anyone that builds a "smart" water heater that requires a neutral or a 120 Volt circuit has proved that he is not smart enough to build a "smart" water heater.
    Right. I was just wondering if it might be "smart" to run a nuetral...

    22 years ago my plumbers tried to talk me out of lowboy gas heaters in the crawlers. I was too "smart" to listen to them. I'd like to get this chit right in case i last another 22.

  15. #15
    Electrician Chris75's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hammerslammer
    Just remembering the days when we ran 10-2 for dryers....
    10-2 was never allowed for a dryer...need a insulated neutral.... You were allowed to use the neutral as a ground, but not the other way around...

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