(206) 949-5683, Top Rated Plumber, Seattle
Results 1 to 15 of 37

Thread: Disconnect for water heater??

Hybrid View

  1. #1
    DIY Member hammerslammer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    68

    Default Disconnect for water heater??

    I'm moving my water heater and I guess i will need a disconnect at the new location. So i'm thinking a metal box with a double pole single throw 30 amp switch will do. Am I close?? Thanks!!

  2. #2
    Licensed Electrical Contractor Speedy Petey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    NY State, USA
    Posts
    975

    Default

    NO! Expensive and more work.
    Use a plain 60A non-fused "pull-out" type disconnect. The type used for A/C installations. They are fully self contained and run about 10 bucks.

  3. #3
    Electrical Contractor/Instructor jwelectric's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    2,522

    Default

    Or

    Use a lock out on the breaket for about $2

  4. #4
    Electrician Chris75's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Litchfield, CT
    Posts
    608

    Default

    Or

    Maybe he's moving the heater next to the panel so he would not even need a separate disconnect...

  5. #5
    DIY Member hammerslammer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    68

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Chris75
    Or

    Maybe he's moving the heater next to the panel so he would not even need a separate disconnect...
    No it will be a good ways from the panel. I was checking out the disconnects that Speedy mentioned at the depot and they look like a pretty good deal . They had a 30 amp and a 60. I guess the 60 is recomended because the breaker will be 30a.?? Thanks for the replys.

  6. #6
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    21,376

    Default

    By definition, it would seem that if you have a 30A breaker, the disconnect would need to be rated for at least 30A; I think the 60A isn't needed. If I understand this, it's sort of like sizing the wiring, you can't use less than 12g on a 20A circuit, but 10g would be overkill...why spend the money unless you have a very long run.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •