(206) 949-5683, Top Rated Plumber, Seattle
Results 1 to 13 of 13

Thread: Cost to have gas line ran to stove?

  1. #1

    Default Cost to have gas line ran to stove?

    Hi, can anyone give me a ballpark figure for having the following job done?

    We currently have an electric stove but our natural gas line runs directly under (full basement) the stove and we plan to switch to gas. So all that I believe needs to be done is to tap into this line and run a line up through the floor to the stove.

    I want to have someone come in and do it to make sure that is to code but I don't want to get taken.

    Thanks!
    Kevin
    Avon, Ohio

  2. #2
    Licensed Grump GrumpyPlumber's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Licensed Grump
    Posts
    1,404

    Default

    Too many unmentioned variables there.
    Joist direction...any drilling?, gas main size & number of BTU's attached vs length, availability for connection to the main...will it need to be threaded? or is there a tee available?
    Best to get a couple of estimates...or take pics, post them and hope we can see whats there.


    Could be a $150 quicky, could be a whole day $1,000+....
    "The biggest regrets we have in life are the chances we never took."

  3. #3

    Default

    * The pipe is 1" OD & very easily accessable.
    * Runs parallel to the joists but it needs to move one joist over to go up through the floor behind the stove. I will drill hole before the plumber comes in.
    * The pipe has no T, pipe will need to be threaded. It is currently a straight pipe that runs right on past the stove area.
    * BTUs I don't know.
    Kevin
    Avon, Ohio

  4. #4

    Default

    I'm no expert but I did sleep at a Holiday Inn last night.

    I'd say between $250 and $500.

    Tom

  5. #5
    Sound and Light Suppervisor for a School District tjbaudio's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    162

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by enviroko
    * The pipe is 1" OD & very easily accessable.
    * Runs parallel to the joists but it needs to move one joist over to go up through the floor behind the stove. I will drill hole before the plumber comes in.
    * The pipe has no T, pipe will need to be threaded. It is currently a straight pipe that runs right on past the stove area.
    * BTUs I don't know.
    I would let the plumer do the drilling. He/she may drill first or may get the T in and then drill to where it ended up. You want the min size hole you can get. Drilling first and then having to ream out the whole would suck. Also what if you slip and cut the pipe? Probably wont damage it too bad but it may make for a problem. All in all I think the drilling is the minimal part of the project. You wont save much time of money and may cost extra!

  6. #6
    Commercial Plumber markts30's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    Posts
    630

    Default

    What else is being fed by this line?
    You can only run so many BTUs on a given length of 1"...
    Does your water heater, clothes dryer, furnace, bar-b-que etc run on the same line?
    How about a gas fired pool heater etc...
    Once you know how many BTUs you are drawing from that line, you can figure if the new fixture will overtax it (some gas ranges can run upwards of 85-100,000 BTUs though most are less)
    A 1" pipe with the furthest fixture having 80' of pipe to it can only support 222,000 BTUs
    As well, be aware that cutting a t into the middle of an existing gas line is going to be a pain... The plumber is going to have to use a left and right nipple and the whole system will likely have to be re-tested and inspected if the work is going to be permitted (I would advise to have a permit pulled and inspection done...)
    Last edited by markts30; 08-16-2007 at 09:20 PM.

  7. #7
    Consultant cwhyu2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Cincinnati OH
    Posts
    1,330

    Default trak pipe

    Trak pipe is the way I would go.But you need to have someone trained
    to install this product.Look it up.

  8. #8
    Licensed Grump GrumpyPlumber's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Licensed Grump
    Posts
    1,404

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cwhyu2
    Trak pipe is the way I would go.But you need to have someone trained
    to install this product.Look it up.
    Here lies the irony, I'm certified in tracpipe and wardflex (like thats a big deal).
    I still prefer hard piping over it.
    "The biggest regrets we have in life are the chances we never took."

  9. #9

    Default

    i once had this done... listen to this....

    i called the plumber.... and he started dragging out this very thick book.. looked at my project... started doing all this estimating stuff.... came up to 1300.

    i said thanks... somehow i got taken for 35 dollars for the estimate.

    called the gas company.... done for 225.


    second house.... had a friend do it... about 150 including materials..

    both of these jobs were very similar... under house access two runs with a couple of 90's.

    both were black pipe... code here allows flexible...but i wanted black pipe

  10. #10
    Master Plumber master plumber mark's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    indianapolis indiana - land of the free, home of the brave....
    Posts
    4,243
    Blog Entries
    1

    Talking gas line run

    I usually just tell people that our Minimum for fooling
    with a gas line is $250.00..

    we cant come out for less and ballparking the job
    usually its a not -to-exeed price of $450..


  11. #11
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    Posts
    25,641

    Default gas company

    Our gas company is NOT ALLOWED to do any piping after the meter, regardless of the amount. And they value their cushy jobs too much to rist side jobs.

  12. #12
    Electrician Chris75's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Litchfield, CT
    Posts
    608

    Default

    Don't forget you will need an electrician to add a 115v receptacle for the gas stove... unless you were going to do that work yourself...

  13. #13
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    21,405

    Default

    If you go with a dual-fuel stove, then you'd need 240vac...while you're at it, another circuit for a vent hood, and maybe more to bring the room up to code while you're at it.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •