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Thread: Built in microwave needs dedicated circuit?

  1. #1

    Default Built in microwave needs dedicated circuit?

    I'm remodeling my kitchen in a 30 yr old house. Adding a built in microwave with range hood. Ten years ago when I did so in a house in San Jose, California the contractor said I needed a dedicated circuit. Is that true all over. Thanks, Murphy in San Diego

  2. #2

    Cool

    Now it depends on what the parameters your contractor said while referring to the term"DEDICATED CIRCUIT".As per my knowledge micro ovens do exert a good load and hence the wiring should be checked on a quarterly basis in order to avoid short circuit.
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  3. #3
    Plumber Cass's Avatar
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    Yes, a microwave needs its own circuit as does a dish washer and garbage disposal.

  4. #4
    Licensed Electrical Contractor Speedy Petey's Avatar
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    Most "in-place" appliances do require a dedicated circuit. NONE can be served by the counter receptacle circuits.

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    In the Trades Bob NH's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by marketvgk
    Now it depends on what the parameters your contractor said while referring to the term"DEDICATED CIRCUIT".As per my knowledge micro ovens do exert a good load and hence the wiring should be checked on a quarterly basis in order to avoid short circuit.
    Marketvgk; I am uncertain about what you are saying, and obviously very concerned about appropriate measurements to make and things to check "to avoid a short circuit."

    Please explain for all of us:

    1. What "parameters your contractor said" might be related to the "DEDICATED CIRCUIT"?

    2. What is a "good load", as contrasted with not-a-good-load?

    3. What exactly would I check "on a quaterly basis in order to avoid a short circuit.", and what measurements would I make that might help me avoid a short circuit?

    4. Will I be able to check the "good load" circuits myself, or will I have to hire an electrician or get special equipment?

    5. Should all of the other "good load" circuits be checked in the same way that the "good load" microwave circuit is checked? I have a water heater, dryer, cooktop, oven, air compressor, and a subpanel that all have loads greater than the microwave so I need to be sure that I am doing the right things.

    I have a lot of catching up to do because I have missed 169 quarterly checks on each of at least six circuits in the 42+ years that I have been living in my house. I guess I have been lucky because I have had no short circuits. I did leave a little slack in the wires so even if they got a little shorter during those years it didn't cause a problem.

    Postscript: You might want to work on getting a little more credible gobbledegook as you go around posting your business link on various forums.
    Last edited by Bob NH; 08-14-2007 at 03:15 PM.

  6. #6
    Electrical Contractor/Instructor jwelectric's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cass
    Yes, a microwave needs its own circuit as does a dish washer and garbage disposal.
    In theory I agree but

    210.23(A) (2) Utilization Equipment Fastened in Place. The total rating of utilization equipment fastened in place, other than luminaires (lighting fixtures), shall not exceed 50 percent of the branch-circuit ampere rating where lighting units, cord-and-plug-connected utilization equipment not fastened in place, or both, are also supplied.


    Quite often I will put the light above the kitchen sink on the same circuit as the disposal

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