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Thread: Accidentally drilled hole in PVC pipe

  1. #1

    Question Accidentally drilled hole in PVC pipe

    While I was remodelling my downstairs bathroom - after finishing and installing the bathroom fixtures - I accidentally drilled through one side of the upstairs bathroom's PVC drain pipe. I know this is the drain pipe because I had my wife flush the toilet up there and water came out of the hole. Now, the hole is about 1/4" wide (the size of the drill bit) and only goes through one side. What is the best way to repair this without cutting a huge hole in my newly finished wall? I was told at a hardware store that I might be able to fill the hole with pipe cement. I have tried this and it doesn't look very promising. Suggestions?

  2. #2
    Plumber RioHyde's Avatar
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    yeah the PVC cement thing wont work. The correct way to fix this is to cut out the bad section of piping and replace it using a short piece of PVC and a couple of repair (slip) couplings.

    I did once see a homeowner repair for this exact problem. The homeowner took a slip coupling, cut it in half then glued the two halves over the pipe where the hole was. It actually worked. Its not right, but it worked. I would recommend repairing it correctly of course.

    good luck!

  3. #3

    Default Hate to say it

    I hate to say it but, in all my years of working on the houses I have tried everything from crawling in tight spaces, to putting band aid fixes, all to avoid cutting into a drywall.
    You know what I found in the end?
    Its not worth it!
    Cut yourself nice size hole, using inside of the studs as a guide, cut the pipe right thru the drilled hole, and install the slip coupler, not regular one. Slip coupler does NOT have a ridge inside in the middle, that allows U to slip the coupler on one pipe (all the way onto the pipe) align the pipes and slide the coupler over the other piece.
    Then, attach couple of scraps of 2x4 onto the studs, and put the cut drywall piece back into the hole attaching it to the scraps of 2x4.
    If you have textured drywall, after you patch it, you can buy texture spray can at H.D. or Lowes for few bucks and spray texture on the wall. After paint, you'll never see it and you'll never have a problem.

    Oh BTW, you know what's worst than the big hole that you know its leaking when U flush? A little one that allows water to sip down the pipe, not showing on the drywall but rotting your lumber away. And that mysterious smell from the sewer that you'll have no idea where its coming from.

    Hope this helps.
    Mario P.

  4. #4
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    Default hole

    If you can find a slip coupling without the ridge in the middle that will be the easiest, othewise use a regular coupling and cut it in two right next to the ridge. Take the coupling, or the piece without a ridge, and make a verical cut on two sides somewhere past the centerline so you have one piece that looks like a "C" and the other on looks like ")". Take the "C" and coat it with primer and cement and do the same with the pipe around the hole. Then "snap" the coupling piece over the hole. You are done and it is permanent. hj

    hj,
    I've done this too. It really is a nice quick way to patch.
    Terry
    Last edited by Terry; 03-02-2005 at 03:34 PM.

  5. #5
    Plumber jimbo's Avatar
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    Most of my professional colleagues will disagree with me on this: I take some epoxy putty such as RectorSeal 400, and carefully work some into the hole, not too much, then build up a "lump" about 1" diam on the oustide to give a good bond. The only "negative" is that if you get a protrusion of putty on the inside of the pipe, if could snag "things" and caue a buildup. On a vertical pipe, I do not see a problem, and do be careful to not force too much putty inside the pipe.

  6. #6

    Default Re: Epoxy

    Jimbo, I went to a hardware store again and got a few different opinions. The last guy I talked to said that he had done the same thing before and suggested that I use epoxy. I put it in the hole as per your directions this morning. I'll see how it goes when I get home from work tonight. By the way, that epoxy stuff is pretty amazing. I made a test "snake" out of it and its basically hard as metal in a half hour. Thanks for the advice. I'll let you guys know how it went.

    - fish

  7. #7
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    Default epoxy

    Getting hard in half an hour is not the important thing, there are other things that will do the same thing. The important thing is whether it will adhere to the plastic, and do it "forever".
    Last edited by hj; 03-02-2005 at 06:56 PM. Reason: text

  8. #8
    Plumber jimbo's Avatar
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    Are we talking epoxy or ******?

  9. #9

    Wink Epoxy

    Looks like the epoxy did the job. Thanks for the tip jimbo.

  10. #10

    Default PVC hole repair recommendations

    I know the right way to fix this problem is to cut out and replace the bad section. Given the date of the last post, I figured I'd ask whether Expoxy is still the way to go with this.

  11. #11
    In the Trades Bob NH's Avatar
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    It is not pressure pipe. I would repair the hole with one of the following methods.

    1. Cut a 1" x 1" piece off a coupling or other fitting with the correct curvature. Glue it on using PVC primer and glue, and hold the piece on with a stainless clamp.

    2. Using a belt sander or other tool, make a slightly tapered plug from a piece of PVC fitting. Glue it into the hole with primer and PVC cement. This has the advantage of requiring the smallest hole through the wall. Work on the plug until it fits pretty tight and doesn't stick more than about 1/8" into the inside space of the pipe.

  12. #12
    Plumber Cass's Avatar
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    I have done this a few times. Heat a putty knife or similar with a torch, when it is hot, hit the pipe where the hole is and melt the plastic closed. Your done.

  13. #13
    Plumber/Gasfitter dubldare's Avatar
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    RioHyde and mariomp have the only two answers that make a lick of sense.

    I 'might' do a patch job in my house, but not in the house of my customer.

    That's not about making money. It's about doing right by the guy paying for it.

  14. #14
    Plumber Cass's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dubldare
    RioHyde and mariomp have the only two answers that make a lick of sense.

    I 'might' do a patch job in my house, but not in the house of my customer.
    It is his house.
    Last edited by Cass; 12-13-2005 at 04:35 AM.

  15. #15
    DIY Senior Member rshackleford's Avatar
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    Google "hydrowrap" it is like casting material and should seal this up. If you can't find any, contact me and i can get you some.
    rshackleford

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