(206) 949-5683, Top Rated Plumber, Seattle
Results 1 to 14 of 14

Thread: Rewiring 2nd floor

  1. #1

    Default Rewiring 2nd floor

    A relative is refurbing the 2nd floor to his home. The wiring presently is knob & tube. He would like to upgrade the wiring while the walls our removed, but he questioning how to get the new wiring from the basement, 1st floor, then to the 2nd floor. Going thru interior walls is about the only way to do this. But coming upon obstruction is another issue...... Thanks

  2. #2
    Electrical Contractor/Instructor jwelectric's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    2,523

    Default

    Install a chase in a downstairs closet

  3. #3

    Default

    This would an exposed cable running along closet wall to 2nd floor?

  4. #4
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    21,390

    Default

    Is there a place in the house where there are two closets directly above each other? Or, is there an area where there are plumbing lines or air ducts that go from floor to floor?
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  5. #5
    Plumber jimbo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    San Diego
    Posts
    9,001

    Default

    Not an exposed cable.

    I would say the general idea might be to get one properly sized cable going up to a subpanel on the second floor, and treat the second floor as an all new unit, which is what you are doing. The single feed would have to be in conduit, or some sort of boxed in chase, in an inconspicuous place like the corner of a closet.

  6. #6
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    21,390

    Default

    Or, if you took the wall off of the back of that closet, you could run all of your leads up from the basement through there, and maybe up to the attic, then down to where you want them. Just depends...
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  7. #7
    In the Trades brownizs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Springfield, IL
    Posts
    196

    Default

    The relative does know that they will have to have the job inspected. That is because it is a rewire from existing Knob & Tube to upgraded work.

  8. #8

    Default

    This same home has a 200 amp main service panel with No Main Breaker.. I would assume its wired to main lug. Since no main breaker is present does the power have to be disconnected at meter to add a main?

  9. #9
    In the Trades Bob NH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    3,307

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jed54
    This same home has a 200 amp main service panel with No Main Breaker.. I would assume its wired to main lug. Since no main breaker is present does the power have to be disconnected at meter to add a main?
    It is customary but not required to have a single Main Circuit Breaker.

    230.70 Requires a means to disconnect all conductors in a building from the service-entrance conductors.

    230.71 Requires that there be not more than six switches or circuit breakers, grouped together, to meet the requirement of 230.70.

    It would be permissible put not more than six two-pole breakers in the Main Lug panel to serve sub-panels at various points in the house.

    It would be better to install a single main breaker to disconnect all of the service conductors.

    It is sometimes possible to convert the Main Lug configuration to a Main Breaker panel.

    See 230.90 Exception 3 regarding the capacity of the 2 to 6 circuit breakers providing protection to the Service conductors.

  10. #10
    Jack of all trades frenchie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Brooklyn, NY and Fire Island, NY
    Posts
    1,244

    Default

    From the context, I assume you meant, "to add a sub-panel"?

    No. The sub-panel feeds off a breaker in the main panel.



    Or did you mean, to add a main breaker?

    Yes, it'd have to be shut off at the meter.
    Master Plumber Mark:

    there is nothing better than the
    manly smell of WD 40 in the air
    while banging away on brass with a chisel and hammer...

    it smells like......victory......

    do not hit your thumb...
    __________________
    Just so everyone's clear: I'm the POODLE in the picture ("french", get it?) The hot woman is my wife.

  11. #11

    Default

    No... I understand no breaker is needed at subpanel as long as their is a breaker located at the main feeding the subpanel. The main panel itself has no main...... Actually, I cannot understand with all the codes that have been created thru time..( which some do not make any sense ) why it's not necessary to have a main breaker... You would think this would be mandatory in case of an emergency.....

  12. #12
    In the Trades Bob NH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    3,307

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jed54
    No... I understand no breaker is needed at subpanel as long as their is a breaker located at the main feeding the subpanel. The main panel itself has no main...... Actually, I cannot understand with all the codes that have been created thru time..( which some do not make any sense ) why it's not necessary to have a main breaker... You would think this would be mandatory in case of an emergency.....
    There is a requirement for a means to disconnect all conductors in a building from the service-entrance conductors.

    Go back and carefully read my earlier post with particular attention to the citations of 230.70 and 230.71 from the 2005 NEC.

  13. #13

    Default

    I checked for the NEC code manual today.. I was surprised to see they were 120.00....... can it be obtained for a lower $ price then this?

  14. #14
    In the Trades Bob NH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    3,307

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jed54
    I checked for the NEC code manual today.. I was surprised to see they were 120.00....... can it be obtained for a lower $ price then this?
    The 2005 code is less than $50 on the auction site, including shipping.

    The 2008 code is $75 to non-members.
    http://www.nfpa.org/catalog/search.a...y=nfpa+70+2008

    The handbook is $130 for non-members.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •