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Thread: Problem Installing Toto Aquia on Closet Flange on Floor

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    DIY Member herbolaryo's Avatar
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    Exclamation Problem Installing Toto Aquia on Closet Flange on Floor

    The clearance between the wall and the center of the toilet flange is 11 inches.

    The instruction on the Toto Aquia Manual says it should be 12 inches.

    Is there a way to move the toilet Flange 1 inch away from the wall?

    Complete Instructions for the Aquia written by Jamie
    Last edited by Terry; 03-08-2009 at 09:56 AM.

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    Licensed Grump GrumpyPlumber's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by herbolaryo
    The clearance between the wall and the center of the toilet flange is 11 inches.

    The instruction on the Toto Aquia Manual says it should be 12 inches.

    Is there a way to move the toilet Flange 1 inch away from the wall?
    I can only guess you had a 10" toilet prior to this one that had a 1" gap behind the tank.
    Unfortunately you'll either have to do the same, or go under the floor and cut in a coupling and cut the floor to get the flange away from the wall.
    I'm going to make a second guess....this is a bath remodel and someone thought a 12" rough was 12" away from the rough wall.
    "The biggest regrets we have in life are the chances we never took."

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    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
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    With the Aquia, you will need about 11.5" from the finished wall.
    edited on 7/18/2007

    That means moving the drain, unless you have a 4" drain, and you can fake it over a bit.
    Last edited by Terry; 03-08-2009 at 09:57 AM.

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    Licensed Grump GrumpyPlumber's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Terry
    With the Aquia, you will need about 11.5"

    That means moving the drain, unless you have a 4" drain, and you can fake it over a bit.
    Pullleease don't tell me thats the actual rough!
    I'm going to guess you mean it can go as far as 11-1/2"...I just don't wanna think I'd have to look at toilet specs before roughing...no, say it ain't so.
    Last edited by Terry; 03-08-2009 at 09:58 AM.
    "The biggest regrets we have in life are the chances we never took."

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    DIY Member herbolaryo's Avatar
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    Exclamation

    So that will mean it will be 12 1/2 inch from the wall.
    I guess that would be OK.
    Our dilemna is how to pull out the old flange.
    I saw this flange buster... http://video.google.com/videoplay?do...026&pr=goog-sl

    However it is available in 4 inch diameter. Ours is 3 inch.
    The toilet is in 2nd floor by the way.
    Any suggestion of removing the flange without tearing the ceiling underneath or a big portion of the floor making it unstable.

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    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
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    A 12" rough-in is measured from the finished wall.
    That would mean, with 1/2" drywall, the rough would be 12.5" from the wood studs.
    The Aquia needs 11.75" from the finished wall to the center of the drain.
    Many toilets that are 12" rough, will work at 11", but not the Aquia.

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    Licensed Grump GrumpyPlumber's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Terry
    A 12" rough-in is measured from the finished wall.
    That would mean, with 1/2" drywall, the rough would be 12.5" from the wood studs.
    The Aquia needs 11.75" from the finished wall to the center of the drain.
    Many toilets that are 12" rough, will work at 11", but not the Aquia.

    Oh great...lol...now I gotta start asking what kind of toilet's going in on remodels.
    I imagine it'd still work on an actual 12"....with it being 1/4" difference.
    "The biggest regrets we have in life are the chances we never took."

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    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    Grumpy, the Aquia is a 12" rough toilet...this guy has 11". As with most toilets, there is normally a little gap behind the toilet, for this toilet, about 1/4"...it won't fit with 11"!
    Last edited by jadnashua; 07-19-2007 at 06:53 AM.
    Jim DeBruycker
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    Licensed Grump GrumpyPlumber's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jadnashua
    Grumpy, the Aquia is a 12" rough toilet...this guy has 11". As with most toilets, there is normally a little gap behind the toilet, for this toilet, about 3/4"...it won't fit with 11"!
    Jim, I know that.
    When I rough a 12" I leave 12-3/4" to 13" from the stud to center of flange..but Terry posted this:
    Quote Originally Posted by Terry
    With the Aquia, you will need about 11.75" from the finished wall.
    edited on 7/18/2007

    That means moving the drain, unless you have a 4" drain, and you can fake it over a bit.
    It's only a 1/4" difference, but it's apparently not like other 12" roughs if thats the case.
    Getting knots just thinking about having to research each model before doing rough remodels or new construction.
    I prefer the tank to rest on the wall...minimizing movement and potential trouble later on.
    Last edited by GrumpyPlumber; 07-18-2007 at 08:29 PM.
    "The biggest regrets we have in life are the chances we never took."

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    from Terry
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    A 12" rough-in is measured from the finished wall.
    That would mean, with 1/2" drywall, the rough would be 12.5" from the wood studs.
    The Aquia needs 11.75" from the finished wall to the center of the drain.
    Many toilets that are 12" rough, will work at 11", but not the Aquia.

    Hi Terry and other commode experts ...

    I am about to purchase an Aquia for a bathroom remodel and I am glad I found this forum. I have a rough in question. I now have an actual rough in of 11 3/4" from drywall(after adding a 1/2" sheerwall to the behind the toilet). I still have to plaster this wall as well ... 2 coats of veneer. So add probably atleast another 1/8".

    So at 11 5/8" is it a NO Go with the Aquia? Does base board effect the set back equasion as well .. do I add the thickness of the base to the finished wall ...since we are dealing with a skirt?


    Thanks

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    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
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    I think it will fit with 11-5/8"

    The tank fits close, the bowl has some room.

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    DIY Junior Member Emma3's Avatar
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    Default Too much room for Aquia?

    I've got the opposite problem -- just had new rough-in for Aquia, plumber put it 14" O.C. from the stud. Will this put the tank far enough from the wall to cause any problem (or just look bad)? If so, I'd consider furring out the wall slightly before the sheetrock, but don't want to bother unless it's significant.

    Guess I'm glad it's not too close... that would be much worse.

    Also - I keep reading about how the Aquia install is difficult or more time consuming than other models. Does this apply to the final install only, or are there any "tricks" that apply to the rough-in stage?

    Thanks in advance!
    Andra

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    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    There's probably 3/4" or so (you can check the spec sheets on the toto website) when installed with a 12" rough-in. So, you'll have two more inches. Whether you think it looks bad or not depends on the room. Keep in mind that that distance is from the FINISHED wall, not the studs.

    If the floor is going to be tiled, the plumber will need to drill some holes through the tile - some floor tile requires a diamond bit to do it. If he doesn't have one, he will complain, and it will take him longer. A normal toilet just gets attached to the flange. The aquia has an adapter bolted to the flange, then has the bracket attached to the floor. If it is on vinal or something like that, it should only take a little longer (except, he needs to actually read the instructions and measure, something some guys refuse to do!).
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

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    DIY Junior Member Emma3's Avatar
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    Thanks, Jim. I think we'll close the gap a bit when it comes time to finish the wall. Anything > 2" seems really excessive.

    Drilling through the tile would happen at the same time as final install? After reading about the special sanding required for tank connection, I'm thinking of hiring someone with Aquia experience to do this part, so they would know to expect the drilling.

    Can't wait to finally have the Aquia ready to go -- I love our Pacifica, but would have gone with dual-flush had it been available at the time we did that bath.

    Thanks for the quick responses, as always!

    Andra


    TOTO Pacifica CST808
    Last edited by Terry; 03-21-2009 at 12:05 PM.

  15. #15
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    Unless the plumber has installed one previously, he may not have a diamond core bit with him to drill the tile. While sanding isn't always necessary, it only take a moment, and just smooths the casting out a little making a better seal. It often will seal without it, but why do it twice if it doesn't?

    Some floor tile is VERY hard, so not so much. A diamond bit will cut anything, but a carbide one may only scratch the surface. So, having the right tool can mean the difference of an hour or more of cussing.

    The adapter and brackets go on after the finished floor is installed. You could install it and save the grief.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

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