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Thread: Does this Toto perform well?

  1. #1
    DIY Member jumpyg's Avatar
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    Default Does this Toto perform well?

    I have a 14 1/4" rough-in in my 1/2 bath. I would rather not mess with Toto's unifit adapter. I came across this Toto toilet for a 14" rough-in on their site, and was wondering how well it performs. I love the Drake I just installed in my other bath. Will this one disappoint? I know it's not GMax. Do they make a better toilet for a 14" rough-in? Any other manufacturers that make a good one?

    14" rough-in Toto

  2. #2
    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
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    Well, it works as well as the CST703 12" regular bowl.
    A shallow bowl with some splash.
    The CST703.14 uses the 12" bowl and a thicker tank.

    If you like the Drake, I would get another one. Both toilets will wind up being about the same distance from the wall at the end of the bowl.

  3. #3
    DIY Member jumpyg's Avatar
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    Thanks Terry, but I'm more worried about the gap between the tank and the wall. Can I just get a thicker tank and put the guts of a Drake in it? Then I would use a Drake bowl. Any other creative solutions?

    By the way, I looked for the review of the CST703 and couldn't find it.

    Any other manufacturers make a good-flushing 14" rough toilet?
    Last edited by jumpyg; 02-23-2005 at 10:30 AM.

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    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    Other than the fact that you'd have a 12" unifit adapter you can't do anything with, what are your concerns about buying the 14" adapter? Works fine...I think that they are easier to install than a "normal" one. You don't have all that weight to muck around getting the most important seal done, then just set the toilet down on the riser.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  5. #5
    DIY Member jumpyg's Avatar
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    I should have mentioned that the toilet sits on ceramic tile. I'm worried about drilling the tile to attach the adapter to the floor. The previous owners put the tile in and I have zero replacement tiles in case one cracks. I really don't want to have a cracked tile. I don't think anyone can guarantee 100% that drilling the tile WON'T break it, right? Not sure I want to take the risk.

  6. #6
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    I've only installed two of them, both of them on tile. One was granite tile, and the other porcelain. No cracks...if the tile is installed properly, it is supported well, and with the right drill bit, it is like going through hardwood. Course, if you don't have the right bit, it can be a real pain. The toilet would cover all but the most nasty crack, even if it did happen.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  7. #7
    DIY Member jumpyg's Avatar
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    I don't have any idea if they installed the tile properly. Seems like it was a good job, though. Maybe I will give it a shot.

    What type of drill bit do I need?

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    Plumber RioHyde's Avatar
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    I usually use a 1/4" masonary bit in a 18V Dewalt hammer drill/driver and plastic anchors. I believe they make tile bits, but the masonary bit that comes in an anchor kit works so well I've never bought the tile bit.

  9. #9
    DIY Member jumpyg's Avatar
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    Okay, thanks. I've got a masonry bit, so I'll give that a shot.

  10. #10
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    I'll tell you that depending on the tile, a carbide bit may or may not work well. Not all tile is created equal - I used the same bit (carbide) to drill holes in the granite and it went through like hardwood. The same bit on a hard porcelain took about 10 minutes per hole. If the tile is hard, use a spray bottle to keep the bit cool or use a little plumber's putty, make a little dam and fill it with water. Interesting in that the drill I used was also a Dewalt hammer drill. to get it started without the bit skating, you can put down some masking tape first.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

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