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Thread: Changing kitchen faucet.

  1. #1
    DIY Member Rughead's Avatar
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    Default Changing kitchen faucet.

    Hi folks. Attached are photos of my brother's kitchen sink faucet which he wants to change as it's old and leaks due to the incredibly good water pressure he now has as result of connecting to the city supply (after 20 years) Doesn't look too complicated. Simple change out or what? I'm not there yet to do this for him but will be in 2 weeks when I'm on home leave. He'll assist. Assume I'll need a special wrench to get up in there. Any advice on what not to forget, etc. is appreciated along with recommendations on a good quality faucet similar to what he has with the pull-out sprayer. Thanks for any advice. Cheers and best regards from Amman, Jordan. Ric.

  2. #2
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    No pictures. The only thing I can suggest is he needs to know whether the threaded parts are metric or US sizes, which would be a bummer if you took something over with you and didn't have the right adapters. When I lived in Amman, a long time ago, most of the water was unpressurized and supplied from storage tanks on the roof. The tanks would be filled when they turned the water on for that district. Don't know if it still runs the same way, or if they've graduated to a closed, pressurized system. That might make a difference in the type of faucet you decide to use.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  3. #3

    Default Faucet Tools

    Recommended tools for replacing faucets include a telescoping basin wrench, a couple of crescent wrenches, and a channel locks. If your faucet retaining nuts are corroded, you may need a set of plumbing sockets or a breaker bar with correct socket. Worst case scenario, you'll need a Dremel with metal cutoff wheel or an angle grinder.
    Last edited by Verdeboy; 06-25-2007 at 09:59 AM.

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    Licensed Grump GrumpyPlumber's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GrumpyPlumber
    basin wrench

    Nix that, I'm punch-drunk...loooonng day today...I meant to say hacksaw.
    IF the faucet is that old sometimes it comes in handy to cut from above if the basin nuts won't budge..(I know a guy that uses a sawzal...not a good idea on a SS, granite, marble or porcelain counter or basin)
    "The biggest regrets we have in life are the chances we never took."

  5. #5
    DIY Member Rughead's Avatar
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    Default Faucet tools.

    Thanks guys. It was the end of a long day in the heat yesterday when I posted and forgot to attach the photos. I'm not taking anything back from Amman to my brother's house in Lancaster, PA. We're gonna buy what we need when I get there. According to him he's got great water pressure now, after finally giving-in and hooking up to the town supply when his pump arrangement in the cellar spring gave up the ghost again. Hope the attached photos give you some idea what I have to work with and what tools I'll need. Can't remember well but I don't think he's well vented either. But let's tackle one thing at a time. Cheers and best regards from Amman, Rug.
    Attached Images Attached Images    

  6. #6
    Licensed Grump GrumpyPlumber's Avatar
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    Ok, thats a single handle pull-out.
    I'm guessing Delta, or American standard, but hard to see.
    Add "philips screwdriver" and to that list of tools.
    BEFORE you do ANYTHING...turn the faucet on, then close the valves below to ensure they work...if you see a drip, you'll need to shut off the water main (not going to "torture" you with details for replacing the valves...best to have a plumber do it)...even a small drip adds up over an hour while you do the work.
    If thats a Delta there's likely an elongated hex shaped brass nut holding the faucet tight...if so they're easy to grab once the supply lines are removed.
    Remove the feed for the spout (chrome plated corrugated line), they usually have a finger crimp, or you unscrew them (lefty loosy, righty tighty)
    The copper water lines can be bent until they break...or use tin snips MAKE SURE to remove them from the angle stops below FIRST! (from the shut-off valves below...again, left loose...you'll need 2 3/8" compression ferrils and nuts for the replacement, I keep a literal bucket of them in my truck)
    If it were a kohler (from I see, it's not) there are philips screws holding it tight...screwdriver does the trick.

    Also, where you have schedule 15 drainage with desanco nuts...you might remove them to make a little space while you work...you might consider having a plumber redo the set-up there later on.
    As it is, the basin on one side is likely to overflow into the adjacent basin when you pull the plug on a full sink of dirty dish water.
    Schedule 40 is required by code in my state for anything after the tailpiece...but that apparently differs from state to state.
    "The biggest regrets we have in life are the chances we never took."

  7. #7
    Commercial Plumber markts30's Avatar
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    Seems like the others pretty much covered everything...
    I would just add putty to the list
    I think I would go ahead and get some 1/4 turn angle stops to replace the ones he has...
    They likely won't shut off for the repair and the new ones are inexpensive...

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