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Thread: stuck in the mud

  1. #1
    DIY Senior Member rshackleford's Avatar
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    Default stuck in the mud

    this was a real bummer.

    rshackleford

  2. #2
    Plumber Cass's Avatar
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    Yeah I guess it would be, not often do thoes guys get machines stuck, did it sink over night?

  3. #3
    DIY Senior Member rshackleford's Avatar
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    no, not overnight.

    the crew was digging in an area know to be wet. the water table was high and the soil was sandy. this is a 30 metric ton class machine. the excavator tracked over this ground twice. the weight and the vibration turned the ground to jello. you could stand twenty feet away from your buddy and make him move like you were both on a trampoline.
    rshackleford

  4. #4
    Plumber Cass's Avatar
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    How long did it take to get it out and how many machines

  5. #5
    DIY Senior Member rshackleford's Avatar
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    we got stuck in the evening. i made several trips to the job site throughout the night to see if we were sinking, it did not sink unless there was movement.

    we started at five in the morning. the first order was to hall in 100 yards of scoria. we pushed the scoria up to the edge of the hole so that we could get other equipment neat the stuck machine. we then use another excavator to dig a ramp out behind the stuck excavator. we then brought in a winch truck and anchored it to a D6 class crawler. the winch truck pulled the 80,000 lb excavator out without a grunt. this took up about nine hours to do. there was a lot of hand digging under the engine to get to the frame between the tracks. this was the only place we could hook onto without springing the machine.
    rshackleford

  6. #6
    Plumber Cass's Avatar
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    That will be one to remember

  7. #7
    DIY Senior Member rshackleford's Avatar
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    i will get some more pics up shortly.
    rshackleford

  8. #8
    Plumber Cass's Avatar
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    I'd like to see them.

  9. #9
    DIY Senior Member rshackleford's Avatar
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    Default







    rshackleford

  10. #10
    DIY Senior Member rshackleford's Avatar
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    Default



    rshackleford

  11. #11
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    That looks like it's a hundred miles from nowhere!

  12. #12
    DIY Senior Member rshackleford's Avatar
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    that's what it all looks like around here.
    rshackleford

  13. #13
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    Wow, if it wasn't cold I'de love that.

    bob...

  14. #14
    Plumber Cass's Avatar
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    With every thing spread out like that how far did they have to go to get the 100 yds. of scoria.

  15. #15
    Master Plumber Dunbar Plumbing's Avatar
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    Default Years ago...

    We heated by wood for years and on an uncle's farm we'd cut deadwood and he would move trees around to clear the land with a D4 straight blade.

    To this day I'll never understand this but he was too cheap to buy new tracks, too cheap to buy rock guards.

    I couldn't begin to tell you how many hours we worked on that dozer with all kinds of large cut timbers like blocks, spud bars, 30 ton hydraulic jacks, chain hoists, come alongs trying to get those wore out tracks back on. Kinda equates to the same downtime you was faced with. Unexpected and costly most times.

    Countless weekends wasted working on it. He finally got new tracks and rock guards after everyone stopped visiting him because of his stubbornness. No one gains but him now.....and now he doesn't have a reason to do it anymore. No help.
    Last edited by Dunbar Plumbing; 07-02-2007 at 11:02 AM.
    Read what the end of this sentence means.

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