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Thread: Are there devices where you can set a temp for shower

  1. #1
    DIY Member herbolaryo's Avatar
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    Exclamation Are there devices where you can set a temp for shower

    I have seen hot water recirculator and external plug in devices which makes shower water hot.

    Is there a device where you can set the absolute temperature for the shower and/or faucet?

    Let us say you want the water set at 28 centigrade...then at that point NO water will come out until it is 28 centigrade....
    Last edited by herbolaryo; 06-05-2007 at 08:12 PM.

  2. #2
    Plumber Cass's Avatar
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    Not to my knowlage.

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    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    There are thermostatic shower valves, but they mix the hot and cold water to produce the set temperature. They won't go over the set temp, but if there isn't enough hot water, it doesn't prevent any from coming out, it just uses all hot. Think of it as a limiting valve in that case, it will never get hotter than the set point.
    Jim DeBruycker
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  4. #4
    DIY Member herbolaryo's Avatar
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    Exclamation

    Quote Originally Posted by jadnashua
    There are thermostatic shower valves, but they mix the hot and cold water to produce the set temperature. They won't go over the set temp, but if there isn't enough hot water, it doesn't prevent any from coming out, it just uses all hot. Think of it as a limiting valve in that case, it will never get hotter than the set point.
    I think that is the anti-scald device that i have seen in some showers.

    If there is no such temperature "regulating" device for shower/faucet...

    Come to think for a moment... Technology has advance so far. You can set the temperature of the room, your refrigerator...

    And yet... the everyday activity... which is the shower... no one has made a "real" thermostat for it.

    Perhaps someone will invent it...
    Last edited by herbolaryo; 06-05-2007 at 09:01 PM.

  5. #5
    Plumber Cass's Avatar
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    There is not enough demand for it to warrent production.

    You could have one made for you, in fact I will make one for you for $100,000.00.
    Last edited by Cass; 06-06-2007 at 03:49 AM.

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    Plumbing Designer FloridaOrange's Avatar
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    Just recirc your hot water line and be done with it.
    Matt
    Semi-professional plumbing designer
    Enjoying life in SW Florida

  7. #7
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    Default valve

    If no water would flow until it reached the set temperature, how would the hot water flow to it in order to activate it.

  8. #8
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    All sorts of companies make thermostatic controlled shower/tub valves, I have one in my shower. As noted, though, you set the max temp, and it tries to achieve that value by mixing the incoming hot and cold. If there isn't enough hot, it keeps attempting to produce the set temp by limiting the cold mixed into it.

    By codes, you must have a valve like this or a pressure balancing valve to prevent inadvertent, unintended hot spurts caused by pressure problems. A properly installed valve will also have a high temp limiting adjustment, but that doesn't work too well on the pressure balanced valves since people can change the WH thermostat, which, since it is a mix and the limit is how far you can turn the hot valve open, only indirectly affects the max temperature achievable.

    A second thing between thermostatically controlled vs pressure-balance is that typically with a pressure-balance, you get no flow control - it is either full on or off. A thermostatically controlled valve usually has a volume control (thus at least two controls). On mine, the volume is a two way valve with a built-in diverter. You turn it one way for the tub, and the other way for the shower. I almost never change the temperature setting.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  9. #9
    Homeowner geniescience's Avatar
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    Default possible.

    this could be interesting for large gyms and health clubs.

    At YMCA's that I have been in, there are a bunch of pressure balancing valves in a big shower room, and at each one the temperature is never right at first and can take some adjusting. It is a bit aggravating to be standing under the jet or right next to it, and to know that its first few seconds won't be at the right temperature -- either too cold or too hot.

    At a very expensive club I go to occasionally, the showers are always at just the right temperature immediately. This place was well built from scratch, so I figure they must have a single pipe in a circuit behind the shower heads and that it recirculates hot shower temperature water from the minute the club opens. This place has warm walls and feels like a sauna, so it probably didn't worry the engineers that hot (warm) shower water would be recirculating all day long, even if they did insulate the pipe.

    In a house, to do the same, would require a recirc loop behind the shower head, and either that loop to be running all the time (a waste of energy unless heating is needed), or a valve to the shower arm, that opens only when the temperature is reached, or a waiting period while you wait after turning on the loop and you guess when to open the shower manually. In each of these three cases, your shower arm has to be Very short or else the water remaining in it will give you a cold water blast before the warm shower water gets to you.

    david

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    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    Yeah, until you can purge the pipe leading to the valve of potentially cool/cold water, regardless of what you do it will take a little bit to get your desired temp. A very complicated dump system could divert that water until the water temp was achieved, but nobody could afford it. WIth decent recirculation and a thermostatic valve, you get your ideal temp very quickly...seconds, and is more than enough for most people. Just don't step into the shower until it happens. Proper placement of the controls means you don't have to be standing under it to turn it on and wait those few seconds.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  11. #11
    Plumbing Designer FloridaOrange's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by geniescience
    . This place was well built from scratch, so I figure they must have a single pipe in a circuit behind the shower heads and that it recirculates hot shower temperature water from the minute the club opens.

    david
    Done correctly, a recirc system runs all the time. You can put a timer on but for most instances I would just leave it on. It's easier on the water heater to maintain the temperature instead of kicking on and off so much.
    Matt
    Semi-professional plumbing designer
    Enjoying life in SW Florida

  12. #12
    DIY Member herbolaryo's Avatar
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    Exclamation

    Quote Originally Posted by FloridaOrange
    Done correctly, a recirc system runs all the time. You can put a timer on but for most instances I would just leave it on. It's easier on the water heater to maintain the temperature instead of kicking on and off so much.
    I have read about the recirculating system. There were independent studies done which were tested on several families...

    It turns out that it was NOT statistically significant...
    Opposite to what the company claims.

  13. #13
    DIY Member herbolaryo's Avatar
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    Exclamation

    I just watch the american inventor in abc.com.
    It is amazing to see how simple innovative idea can make an ordinary person into multimillionaire/billionaire

    Clever inventions start with an idea...
    Since no one has ever invented such a device.
    You might like to patent it soon if you have a working concept....



    Just don't forget to give me a few samples...
    or share a few of your fortune 1 million from your billion profit... Just a thought...

    If such a device is released in the market... I am sure it will be a hit... Coz it will save utility and at the same time be environment friendly...

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