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Thread: new well water cloudy...clay?

  1. #31
    DIY Senior Member rshackleford's Avatar
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    sometimes this happens and it just takes time to get a well to clear up. other times the driller did not spend enough time on development.

    i am glad that it cleared up.
    rshackleford

  2. #32

    Question How about old well water cloudy?!?

    Hello!

    I found this wonderful forum through a Google search. I had to post here because we are having the same issues as gorgemom, except our well is far from new!! (30+ years). We have lived in this house for 5 1/2 years and this is the first issue we've ever had with our water.

    We have called one well company and they've been out for an initial diagnosis. The next step apparently is to have a camera sent down the well. They charge $500 for this (!!!!!).

    I'm just curious if anyone has any input on the cause of very fine silt in the water of an older well. We live in southwest NH where the soil is very sandy. We also have pockets of clay in our yard, and reading the posts here, I'm thinking now the cloudy water we're getting might be clay-related. Some days are better than others, but this started 2 or 3 weeks ago and has not gone away completely for more than half a day or so.

    Anyway, just thought I'd see what anyone had to say on the matter!

    Thanks!

  3. #33
    Like an engineer alternety's Avatar
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    Generally speaking, clay and other things will be removed from the water with a GE/Zenon Homespring whole house filter. One poster above wanted someting and said an RO filter did not remove it. If RO won't get it; Homespring won't either. They go down to 0.02 microns but a proper RO goes even smaller and affects dissolved materials.

  4. #34
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    With a 30+ year old well, you could easily have holes in your casing which can be leaching in surface water from above the aquifer your well was drilled into originally. When it rains it can make this scenario worse.

    If it were mine, I would save the $500.00 and put it towards a new system. Otherwise it may nickel and dime you to death.

    bob...

  5. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by speedbump View Post
    With a 30+ year old well, you could easily have holes in your casing which can be leaching in surface water from above the aquifer your well was drilled into originally. When it rains it can make this scenario worse.

    If it were mine, I would save the $500.00 and put it towards a new system. Otherwise it may nickel and dime you to death.

    bob...

    Yikes...

    Seeing it in those terms, I'm really wondering if part of the pipe has just disintegrated. When this first started, we were having rust in the water. Didn't give it too much thought at first, because we have high iron in our water anyway, and every now and then you'd get some rust. But that would only last a day at best. When the rust persisted and then turned to grit and then very fine silt, we knew it was a bigger deal.

    We have put in a whole-house filter with a very small micron rating, but it gunks up after 2 days and the silt comes right back through.


    Ok, someone give it to me straight: what ball-park range are we talking if we have to have a new system??? Are we talking drilling a whole new well, or somehow replacing the existing casing?

  6. #36
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    Your talking about a new Well. I would be plugging the old well so the surface water doesn't contaminate the new well and the aquifer around it.

    I know these things cost several thousand dollars, but the 30 year old Well doesn't owe you a dime. You could have been paying City Water bills for all those years and been a lot further in the hole than the new Well will put you.

    bob...

  7. #37

    Red face New Bored Well - Water Cloudy

    Hello - I had a new bored well installed about a week ago and the water is cloudy. I can't see anything in the water like debris. The well installer told me to let it sit a few days to see if it would clear up. However, what I've read in your postings suggest I should keep pumping it out and letting it refill. The well is 64 feet deep with possibly 35 to 40 feet of water. I think they said it would generate about 35 gallons per hour. I've already clorinated the water and run it out. I told the well company I would not take a sample for testing until the water is clear. Is there a difference between drilled and bored wells on how to get the water clear?

  8. #38
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    This post is getting a lot of cloudy activity.

    Let the water run as fast as possible, like all the above advice. It should clear up soon.

    bob...

  9. #39

    Default Running the Water Out of a Bored Well

    Does anyone know how long at one time I should run out the water. I've run it out for over an hour but I don't know how long to continue. I think the well has (had) about 35 feet of water. The well company is closed all next week so I can't contact them.

  10. #40
    Moderator valveman's Avatar
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    Sometimes it takes many hours, if not days.

  11. #41

    Default I ran the water too much today (now cloudy and debris)

    I ran the water too much today (over an hour twice). I ended up with not only cloudy water but now it has something that looks like sand in it. I really messed up. My plan is to let the well sit for 2 days and let it recover. Obviously I'll have to flush toilets etc. I'm really nervous about this. All this mess is in my pump, holding tank and copper pipes under the house. My new bored well is 64 deep and I'm guessing had water about 35-40 feet deep. Well company said I should recover about 35 gal per hour but I'm not sure since this area in Virignia is in somewhat of a drought state and it probably filled quickly when the well was first bored. Do you think two days is enough to have a good supply of water. I assume I'll have to clorinate again since I ran too much out.

  12. #42

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    I posted in another thread today about my problem (brownish water). I just now found this thread and now I'm really worried. I already have it scheduled for my friend (who does water treatment) to come to the house tomorrow and install a $2000+ iron treatment system (and new water tank). The house is about 20-25 years old. Now I'm worried that we could be misdiagnosing the problem. Yes, the iron level is high, but perhaps I've got bigger well-related issues?

    The water can be reddish brown, but sometimes just looks yellowish brown and cloudy. A sample I took into a drinking glass in our kitchen was yellowish brown and cloudy, and after several hours it still looks the same. Nothing seems to have settled to the bottom. So could this still be iron, which is hopefully treatable with an iron removal system, or might it be signs of well problems?

    We just moved into the house about one month ago, and I think that our problems are getting worse, not better, the more water we use, so that would seem to differ from the issue/solution described in this thread.

  13. #43
    Like an engineer alternety's Avatar
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    The guys who do this for a living most likely will respond.

    I had small enough clay particles that they would not drop out of suspension in any reasonable time frame.

    I would try to have someone with some chemistry expertise and some appropriate equipment determine what is really there before spending $2K. They can run the water through different pore size filters and see what happens.

    If the water fresh from the well is clear and then turns red, my understanding is that this would be an indication of dissolved iron. Bacteria or oxidation could make this iron precipitate as a visible solid. If there is iron bacteria in the well the water would be red when it is drawn.

    You really need a lab to look at the water.

  14. #44
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    gastongal,

    That rate is 0.58 gpm. That is really low. Very close to what would not be a legal well in some places. For any normal household use you would have to have a storage tank.

  15. #45
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    A general observation on running water from the well to clear up "cloudy". It should be as close to the well pump as possible.

    The pipe to the location you are using for this process should be at least 3/4". The pipe to the faucet should be at least 3/4". And, and here is the issue most often ignored, the hose should be 3/4". The hose is a serious limiter of flow. You want the most flow possible.

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