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Thread: Tub Faucet, Cold Water Slow

  1. #1
    DIY Senior Member molo's Avatar
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    Default Tub Faucet, Cold Water Slow

    Hello everyone in plumbingville

    I am in an area where we have very hard water, we are constantly replacing things (including toilets) beacause there is a rock-hard calcium build-up from the water. I have a two-handled tub faucet (with diverter on the faucet) that is running very slow when only the cold is on. The hot water runs fine. I suspect there is a problem with mineral deposit buildup in the faucet. If this is the case I willl probabaly have to replace the faucet.
    My question is; Are there other things that could be causing only the cold to run slow? (The valves are open all the way). Are there repairs that I could perform to avoid having to replace the whole faucet?

    Thanks in Advance for any help,
    Molo

  2. #2

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    Remove the cold water stem and flush out the line. Have an assistant turn on the water while you hold a bucket by the opening to catch it.

  3. #3
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    Some faucets have screened input filters...they could be clogged. Rather than replacing, sometimes you can just soak the parts in vinegar overnight then brush off what didn't disolve. CLR and other stronger acids will work faster, but cost more. If you have galvanized supply lines, it could just be corroded and needs to be replaced.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  4. #4
    Plumber Cass's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by molo
    Hello everyone in plumbingville

    I am in an area where we have very hard water, we are constantly replacing things (including toilets) beacause there is a rock-hard calcium build-up from the water.
    You realy should get a softener to save on fixture replacement.

  5. #5
    DIY Senior Member molo's Avatar
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    Default Softener Question

    Hello All,

    Yes a softener would probabaly be a good idea, approximately how much would I have to spend to get one that does the job?

    TIA,
    Molo

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