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Thread: Plan review question....

  1. #1
    DIY Junior Member Joelzme's Avatar
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    Default Plan review question....

    Hello,

    I have been a lurker here for a while and have learned a lot. I am remodeling a laundry room to a bathroom. I have done the plans myself and want to make sure the city review process goes smooth. If anyone would check out my plans and comment I would greatly appreciate it. Fyi, where I am (Orlando) wet venting is allowed.

    Thanks and god bless,
    Joel
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    Plumbing Designer FloridaOrange's Avatar
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    I'm going to assume you're using long sweep wyes and not running 90's....
    The biggest problem for what you're doing is mixing the washing machine up with the wet vent. You'll need to tie into your system downstream of the bathroom with your 3" to the washing machine. 3" up to the 90 for the trap on the washine machine, then 2" vent up from there.

    For your reference about the washing machine: http://ecodes.iccsafe.org/icce/gatew...orida_plumbing
    Go to chapter 9, section 909.1.
    Matt
    Semi-professional plumbing designer
    Enjoying life in SW Florida

  3. #3
    DIY Junior Member Joelzme's Avatar
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    FLOrange,

    Hmm, I see what you're saying about the wet vent and the bathroom groups. I was hoping that you'd reply since you are down here. Honestly, I have already done the work and am going and pulling permits now. Yes I know this was backwards, but I'm trying to do right by the city. (I had the inspector come out and do a courtesy walk through already). I did use long sweep 90's.

    Code not withstanding, would this arrangement work, such that I would not be sucking water from the p-traps and everything will flush? The washer is vented as well as the lav, but with only 1.5". 3" drain for a washer seems excessive?

    It would be fairly easy if I had to run the washing machine drain to the 3", but if I could get away with it I would prefer to not have to redo everything. In your experience how likely are the inspectors to allow for deviations?

    Thanks for your thoughts.

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    Plumbing Designer FloridaOrange's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joelzme
    Code not withstanding, would this arrangement work, such that I would not be sucking water from the p-traps and everything will flush? The washer is vented as well as the lav, but with only 1.5". 3" drain for a washer seems excessive?
    It would work, I would've still used a 2" vent for the washing machine but it should work as well. Depends on the washer, if it's large the amount of discharge may be a bit much for the vent size. Washers have been getting larger and more powerful in the last 10 years or so. For peace of mind, if it's possible I would upsize that vent. A 2" sanitary will work fine to the washer, it's the last iteration of the FL code that requires a 3" to the trap.

    The washing machine comment about a 3" sanitary/2" trap comes from Chapter 4, 406.3.

    Quote Originally Posted by Joelzme
    It would be fairly easy if I had to run the washing machine drain to the 3", but if I could get away with it I would prefer to not have to redo everything. In your experience how likely are the inspectors to allow for deviations?

    Thanks for your thoughts.
    It all depends on your local jurisdiction. In Clewiston it seems that anything's fair game, City of Ft Myers on the other hand wants to bend over backwards to enforce the letter of the code. Lee County (which includes but does not over-ride the City of Ft Myers) is more realistic and enforces the intent of the code, which is how it should be, IMHO.

    Feel free to PM if you have any FL specific questions, I'd be happy to try to help.
    Matt
    Semi-professional plumbing designer
    Enjoying life in SW Florida

  5. #5
    Homeowner geniescience's Avatar
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    definitely yes re-do the washer drain.

    Your two jpg drawings do not show the same thing; they don't "confirm" one another. As shown in the top view, you have four elbows for the washing machine drain before the drain water even gets past the toilet. Two 1/4 bends, two 1/8 bends. By redoing it as described above you get past the bathroom group and you only end up with two 1/8 bends. It can be done, you have said you can do it, and it needs doing, so I hope that is enough encouragement.

    Your two drawings show some very sharp corners. The second jpg shows two 1/4 bends at or after the toilet that your first jpg doesn't show as 1/4 bends. Totally not understandable. You are so good at drawing, and then the drawings don't show the same thing. In the second drawing, the cleanout is not pointed in the right direction, if you have a 1/4 bend there. Time to redraw or to re-do.

    By redoing the washer drain, you'll be able to add another vent in one of the two walls that it crosses under. You can add another cleanout too. General remarks; I can't help more than that.

    When pipes are a larger diameter, they carry the same volume of water over longer distances with the same "security" of characteristics, which enables calculations (about what will work) to remain valid over longer distances. The reason the Codes have been asking for ever larger diameters has a lot to do with that. In your cases distances are short, so the next most important limiting factor is venting, and with one more vent you will have gone over and above the minimum, and then (drumroll please) you won't have those physical constraints that caused Codes to require large diameters in the first place. Because distances are short (and number of elbows is reduced too, since elbows are equivalent to distances in their braking effect) and because venting is overprovided beyond the absolute minimum. Although that sounds like I know a lot and very precise knowledge too, I won't feel comfortable answering more than one followup question, worded loosely and generally. Also, don't quote all this as though it is to be picked apart and analyzed; learn on your own without asking me to explain more. (Obviously this applies to anyone else who posts here later too, asking for more). Sorry to be so much in disclaimer tone.

    Are these pipes to be buried under a slab? I'd install more cleanouts.

    david
    Last edited by geniescience; 05-28-2007 at 10:44 AM.

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    DIY Junior Member Joelzme's Avatar
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    David,

    Thanks for the comments. My drawings were thrown together and the plot plan more accurately reflects what is actually done. The iso was just taken from the code book and reworked. This shows my inexperience in doing drawings.

    Incidentally, the plans were reviewed and approved by the permitting people, which really says nothing more then I paid my permit fee. The true test will come when the inspector comes over for a courtesy walk thru. I'm going to explain my situation and see what he says.

    Thanks for your explanation tho. I appreciate your input.

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