(206) 949-5683, Top Rated Plumber, Seattle
Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Another double check re: ceramic floor tile install

  1. #1
    DIY Senior Member DIY's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    150

    Default Another double check re: ceramic floor tile install

    Tile setters are telling me variances to slight variances (1/4" or less) in concrete floors are common...that i can believe. The question is can those out of level/hi ,low areas in the concrete be made up for by trowling out a bit of extra thin set in those areas, so the tile sets level?

    Thanks all!

  2. #2
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    21,405

    Default

    Yes, if you use the right thinset. It is harder to do at tile setting time, but is doable. You can use regular thinset up to 1/4" thick and screed it flat first, though, if you wish. Let that cure overnight, then start out with a flat surface. Most pros wouldn't waste the time, and would level as they go. It takes more skill, so depending on who's doing this, and if you want to do the prep yourself, try flattening it first. If the total thickness of thinset is much more than 1/4", though, you are better off with a medium bed mortar (often called granite and marble), since it has more sand in it and can be installed in a thicker bed without the tile sinking. Thinset is meant to be installed in a thin layer...medium bed can be thicker.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  3. #3
    DIY Senior Member DIY's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    150

    Default double check re: ceramic floor tile install in kitchen

    Jadnashua, Ultraflex 2 professional grade thin set mortar with modified polymer additives by MAPEI will be used. Would this be considered a right type of thin set you were refering to ,for the application desired with level variances in a concrete floor?

  4. #4
    Homeowner geniescience's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    humid summers hot, humid winters cold
    Posts
    2,152

    Default

    yes.

    all thinset are good for this. there is no thinset that is not appropriate for this. Any other thinset is also good. The cheapest thinsets have no polymer; you don't need the polymer for this goal to bond to the slab and fill space, unless there is a reason the tilesetter is aware of that I am not aware of.

    the idea that you could mix some thinset yourself and fill in the depressions is a good thing to do. Even though tilesetters can do some of that along the way, it is much better to do a large part of it in advance for them. You won't do a perfect job, but you will help them by giving them a better starting point. Then, the maximum variance might only be 1/8" and only across smaller areas.

    if you do it yourself in advance, you will ensure that the tilesetters pay attention to getting the flattest floor possible instead of trying to compensate as best they can which may produce a seemingly flat floor that isn't in reality very flat. When a floor isn't all that flat (but looks it), you might find that opening a door all the way makes it bump against the floor tile, far back from the tiles closest to the door sill and frame. Other little problems can also arise.

    david
    Last edited by geniescience; 05-13-2007 at 11:19 AM.

  5. #5
    Aspiring Old Fart, EE, computer & networking geek Mikey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Central Florida
    Posts
    2,686

    Default Why not self-levelling cement?

    It's more expensive than thinset, but a lot easier to get a dead-level surface. I think there was discussion of it here, but you could also check the John Bridge tilesetters forums for details.

  6. #6
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    Posts
    25,651

    Default floor

    You can almost depend on two things when concrete is poured.
    1. The area around the toilet's pipe will be uneven, and possibly higher than the surrounding area.
    2. Floor drains will almost always be higher than the surrounding floor.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •