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Thread: Does this look OK

  1. #1

    Default Does this look OK

    I have re-done the waste line under my beach house and was wondering if this looks like it will be OK. It starts with the W/C down to a 3x3x1 1/2" "Y" and 45 to tub drain 2.5ft. away then below that "Y" is a 3x3x2" combo that leads to vent and washer drain 10" over then over to main 3x3x3 combo going out to sewer. Do you think I will run into any problems with this type of hook up?

    Thanks,
    Ron


  2. #2
    Homeowner geniescience's Avatar
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    Default uh-oh.

    i think master plumbers will tell you the most visible Wye in the photo, is wrong. Since there is no venting in that pipe, you should have used a SanTee. For all other places, a Wye is good. If I'm right abou this, it means - at least -- you'll have to add water into the bathtub P trap after draining the tub, whenever you use the tub or shower in it.

    david

  3. #3

    Default

    Thanks for your response.
    If you are referring to the closest 2" wye that wye is a vent, but it is I guess a wet vent because the washer flows into the vertical 2" vent pipe with a sani-t just above the floor then the 90 to combo. If the 2" in the for ground is a vent why would the p-trap from the tub become empty? It is only 2.5 ft. away. I can still change out to sani-t's (not glued yet) but thought a combo was better. Should I change out the wye on top for the tub to a sani-t also or leave it a wye and 45?

  4. #4
    Homeowner geniescience's Avatar
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    keep it, if it's vented. I think i understand you first sentence in your first post above a lot better now. What you meant to say was that "not shown in the photo" is another connection higher up, where the tub drain and vent get combined. Is this right?

    As for what you should use for the tub, not shown, based on your description so far, well, i think i'll leave that for someone else to comment on, who might have a better way of describing things.

    david

  5. #5

    Default

    Thanks David,
    Here is an updated drawing maybe it will shed a little more info on what I have. Just match up the circled parts

    Ron


    Last edited by mrmedic; 05-04-2007 at 11:27 AM.

  6. #6
    Homeowner geniescience's Avatar
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    Default

    wow that is clear. But the drawing stopped before you drew in the tub P trap and vent. I hope that it is there in reality.

    david

  7. #7

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    David, I don't have a vent at the tub. I thought that because it was within 36" that it did not need one. If I need one how would I put one on the end of the tub run. Could I go up the wall and come across to the 2" vent? I know it has to be above all fixtures. I could come up about six feet then go across thru one stud to 2" vent that goes thru roof. Wall is not load barring. Would I tye into the 1 1/2" tub line with a "T" after the trap?

    Thanks,
    Ron

  8. #8
    Homeowner geniescience's Avatar
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    Default

    the drawing shows that the tub drain arm is parallel to the washer standpipe.

    It could mean that it IS parallel, going vertical? This means your tub is raised up onto a split level, which maybe doesn't make sense.
    ...or
    It could mean that it ISN'T parallel, but your drawing shows it so, just to fit a 3-d world onto a 2-d plane. In which case I think the 36" rule of thumb applies to connecting to a stack, not to another fixture's drain arm. So I think you need a vent (but it is less critical than in the case of a big drain going straight down without venting), because it is wise to put a vent between all fixtures. Years ago, some applications of Code didn't insist on venting between fixtures; this meant that proper drainage relied on "self-venting" meaning internal to the pipe, and dependent on many factors not all of which can be guaranteed, so this way of thinking is now deemed to be unreliable plumbing and not up to Code in most places anymore.

    More than that I cannot say, so I hope someone else steps in here to help you out. Even how I described the situation (right above) may not be totally accurate, so someone may have a clearer explanantion. I think it is a real smart move to add in that extra vent with a SanTee, as you described.

    david

  9. #9

    Default

    Sorry about the picture not 3-D. The tub drain is horizontal. Maybe this will show it better. This is showing the new vent if needed from the tub drain. If you think I don't need the vent (since it is only 2.5 ft. to tub) for the tub drain please say so, that way I won't have to change anything. I really appreciate all of your help. That is why I have not glued it all together yet.

    Ron

  10. #10
    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
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    Default

    I wouldn't be using the toilet vent for a washer drain.


    There should be a 3x2 wye downline for the washer.
    The vent for the washer and the vent for the toilet can tie together six inches above the standpipe for the washer.
    Last edited by Terry; 09-15-2007 at 06:35 PM.

  11. #11

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    OK, thanks Terry,

    I was going with something like that before but did not really have the room. But I think I might have something now. I will leave the washer and 2" vent together above the floor bring it down and connect it to the main with a 3x2 wye. Do you think it is OK to connect a vent from 2" vent over and down to a sani-T below water closet? I have a new picture below. The green would be the Washer and vent and the yellow would be just a vent on it's own. Also if I have this vent on it's own going to the W/C do you think I need the one inline on the tub drain? The tub is less then 36" from the W/C.

    Thanks,
    Ron



  12. #12

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    Terry,
    Do you think the above post will work? And do you think I can get away with no extra vent on the tub?

    Thanks,
    Ron

  13. #13
    Master Plumber Dunbar Plumbing's Avatar
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    That's a flat vent drawn on the toilet. First clog and once it's clear......the waste will block off the vent making it useless.

    The rule is normally no flat venting under 42". You'll have use 45's with a wye or something.

    We always took the vent off the toilet directly behind it; if we didn't have to pull a 3" main vent we'd then use a low-heel 90 and run 2" or 1.5".....toilet counts as 6 fixture units so 10 is the max on 1.5".
    Read what the end of this sentence means.

  14. #14

    Default

    Yes I think I can put a wye in for the toilet vent where I now have the sani-t. If I cant get the wye to match up would a combo wye be OK or is that still to straight? After the combo would be about a 4" pipe going to a 90 up to 2" vent. 4" pipe would have a slant to it. At least 1/2" per ft. pitch.

    Thanks,

    Ron

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