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Thread: Sloping new drain line

  1. #1
    Network Engineer rmelo99's Avatar
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    Default Sloping new drain line

    I'm building a bathroom on the first floor for my mother. Since this is at the far side of the house I have to run a 3" line over to the nearest vertical stack which is 23' away.

    My problem is that for the first 7ft I must stay below a height of 55" and for the remaining 16ft I must be below a height of 36"
    The tie in to the vertical stack is at a height of about 24"

    By my calculations using a min 1/4" per ft slope my line should be at least 8" higher on the high side,right?

    Is the best way to do this in one straight shot or should I run the first 7ft with 1/4" slope then vertical drop or 2 45s to get the last 16ft at 1/4" slope at the lower height?

    I'll try and get a pic posted but I'm on my blackberry right now.
    Thks
    Rem

  2. #2
    Master Plumber nhmaster's Avatar
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    You can go 1/8 ipf with 3" if that will help.

  3. #3
    Network Engineer rmelo99's Avatar
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    Thanks for the info. This will be a 3" line. I can swing the 1/4 inch if anything I'd like to get as much slope as possible. It prob won't get me too much but it sure will make me feel better. I like to not build to the min reqs,

    My main concerns are the best way to run it. Since it seems I can achieve the necessary slope in my setup should I not worry bout any trickery and save on fittings and just get a properly sloped straight run from point A to B?

    Another ques about the tie into the vertical stack, do I have to use a wye or sanitee? And if I do have to use a wye will a street 45 to the wye make my transition?
    Last edited by rmelo99; 02-17-2009 at 06:12 PM.

  4. #4
    Network Engineer rmelo99's Avatar
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    Ok, here is my game plan, any problems with this setup?
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  5. #5
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    Default pipe

    From the drawing, I do not see any problem doing it that way.

  6. #6
    Network Engineer rmelo99's Avatar
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    Couple of changes. The tie into the main stack will be kinda high if I use a WYE because the angle I would be coming in with will be sharp.

    Can I instead use a Sanitee in the vertical stack and come into the side using a long sweep 90?

  7. #7
    Network Engineer rmelo99's Avatar
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    ^^bump^^^^^^

  8. #8
    Master Plumber nhmaster's Avatar
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    A san tee would be the preferable method for going from horizontal to vertical.

  9. #9
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    Default connection

    A better one would be a "Y" with a street 1/8 bend rotated to the proper angle.

  10. #10
    Network Engineer rmelo99's Avatar
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    Thanks for the help, line is installed. I used the sanitee. I assembled the long length of 3" line and didn't glue the elbow to the sanitee. I was then able to get the maximum slope working around the limitations of the area. I ended up with almost 1/2" per foot slope. I think this will work better in the long run and lessen the potential for any stop-ups in the line.

  11. #11
    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
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    My mothers home has 250 feet of 4" clay line running to the main public sewer.
    The only time we had a problem was when the gas company drilled their gas line through the center of the sewer line. 34 years running and no issues.
    She has two 1.6 gallon toilets and one 3.5 gallon.

  12. #12
    Master plumber Jay Mpls's Avatar
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    Too much pitch means your water could run away from your solids.
    That means BLOCKAGE.

  13. #13
    Illinois Licensed Plumber SewerRatz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Mpls View Post
    Too much pitch means your water could run away from your solids.
    That means BLOCKAGE.
    That is a fact, the proper pitch must be maintained to keep the solids in suspension.

  14. #14
    Network Engineer rmelo99's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SewerRatz View Post
    That is a fact, the proper pitch must be maintained to keep the solids in suspension.
    I'm going to have to disagree based on my reading this thread recently. I'm just a DIY'er.

    http://www.terrylove.com/forums/showthread.php?t=26572

  15. #15
    Master plumber Jay Mpls's Avatar
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    You are welcome to disagree.
    We are not rooting against you.(no pun intended!)
    I have been cleaning drains since the 80's,
    your mileage may vary.Just trying to save you headaches.
    Good luck.

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