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Thread: How do you mount an outside hose bib to a stucco wall?

  1. #1

    Default How do you mount an outside hose bib to a stucco wall?

    I drilled a 1 3/8" hole through 10 inches of stucco and cement block and am getting ready to install an outdoor hose bib. I can secure the pipes leading to it in the crawl space, but the last 10 inches of 3/4" pvc can move around inside the hole. The hose bib is coming right out of the stucco wall and needs to be secured so it won't move around when you open and close the valve.

    I'm thinking of wrapping the 10 inches of PVC (in the wall) with pipe insulation to keep it in place, and maybe just caulking the hole around the hose bib to keep that from moving.

    Is there an escutcheon type trim plate people use for this or does anyone have any other ideas?

  2. #2
    DIY scratch-pad engineer leejosepho's Avatar
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    The 1-3/8" hole sounds a little large, but maybe the bib's flange will cover it? If so, two pieces of stainless, threaded rod with crown nuts could be pushed through the flange and the wall from the outside and drawn tight via a couple of small plates and nuts on the inside.

  3. #3
    Plumber Cass's Avatar
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    Yes, the hole is a bit large. Make a stainless plate, like leejosepho said 4"X4" with a hole that will just let the hose bib through. You can attatch the stainless to the wall with clear silicone caulk and some tap cons or what ever you want to use, then attatch the bib with silicone and a couple of stainless screws to the plate.

  4. #4
    Master Plumber master plumber mark's Avatar
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    Talking very easy----very simple

    I do it this all the time....make the hole big.....then

    If you want it to be semi pernament...

    if you want it to never move.

    .....go get a couple t tubes of

    clear ALEX latex--silicone .for under $2.00...

    As you insert the hose bib, lay that stuff on thick

    all the way from the threaded part out to the front end..

    simply smear it on very thick on the shaft and sort of thread it

    into the hole makeing a few 360 turns ...

    even with that large of a hole ..it still chould work fine...

    once that puppy sets up, in a few days......its not going ---NO WHERE...

    you could not pull it out of the wall with a wench


    I suggest you get a good quality Woodford hose bib...

    and make sure you have good fall.....

    cause to change it out again someday might bring you to tears..
    Last edited by master plumber mark; 04-15-2007 at 06:34 AM.

  5. #5
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    Default faucet

    The first mistake would be using PVC if that is actually what you are using. Some hose faucets, called sill cocks, have a flange with opeings to fasten them to the wall.

  6. #6

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    Why I went with PVC:

    It's cold water. It's a 30 foot run to the outside wall. It's a crawl space with a dirt floor. There's so little clearance, I have to lie on my belly to make a couple of the connections.

    Why I used a 1 3/8" hole saw:

    It's the only carbide-tipped hole saw I own. I already invested 25.00 on this job, having to buy a new pipe wrench and a 12 inch arbor extension, and I'm only gonna make a couple hundred on the job.

    Why I'll never work in a tight crawl space again:

    No light. No room to work. It's a repository for old junk, broken glass, etc.,
    Have to lie face down in mud. Cuts all over my hands. Stiff neck and back. Pulled a groin muscle somehow.
    Coughing up phlegm now.

    I'll see if I can find a sillcock that can adapt to PVC. I like the idea of a flange to screw into the wall.

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    Sprinkler Guy Wet_Boots's Avatar
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    I would use a 3/4" FPT sillcock, and thread in a long nipple (brass would be ideal, galvanized would be economical), and use 100% silicone sealant to fill the gaps, and stabilize the sillcock, in the event you have difficulty securing the sillcock flange into the stucco with screws. (I see some stucco that's backed by foam, and not really capable of support) I guess you could also use a 3/4" sweat sillcock and a foot or so of copper, in the same way. The idea is to have all metal in the portion of your work that might take some abuse.

  8. #8
    Master Plumber master plumber mark's Avatar
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    Talking get the woodford...

    if you are gonna do plumbing , you better get
    used to tight crawl spaces.....

    pulling muscles, spider webs, racoon junk...
    its all par for the course...




    why not just get a woodford,
    with the palstic moutning flange to the wall
    solder a copper nipple into it,

    then use a 1/2 sharkbite to adapt to the cpvc...

    Last edited by Terry; 12-22-2008 at 11:14 AM.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by master plumber mark
    if you are gonna do plumbing , you better get
    used to tight crawl spaces.....

    pulling muscles, spider webs, racoon junk...
    its all par for the course...
    Actually, as a general handyman, I can pick and choose. Maybe I'll just skim off the easy stuff from now on (just to bother Kordts) and leave you guys to mess with the spider webs and racoon sh*t.
    Last edited by Cass; 04-17-2007 at 03:12 AM.

  10. #10
    In the Trades kordts's Avatar
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    And I was going to tell you to go to Home Depot to get a sillcock mounting plate, they cost less than 3 bucks. Now I won't. By the way, an advantage to charging plumber's scale, is that jobs are worth doing, even if you hack up furballs, because you get what you are worth.

  11. #11

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    All in fun Kordts.

    I ended up using a 12 inch sillcock with mounting flange attached and drilled holes for tapcons. It's in there solid. No caulk necessary. This job is definitely worth 2 or 3 times what I'm going to get and I'm sure they're still not going to be happy with the bill.

    Another reason for not wanting to work in tight crawl spaces:

    I found a little box that I tore open to use to cover some of the mud to put my head on. Afterward, I shined my flashlight on it and it read Rat Poison!!

  12. #12
    DIY scratch-pad engineer leejosepho's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Verdeboy
    I found a little box that I tore open to use to cover some of the mud to put my head on ... Rat Poison!!
    Better replace it or you might end up being backcharged and with a bad reputation for not leaving the peripherals as you found them!

  13. #13
    Plumber Cass's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Verdeboy
    This job is definitely worth 2 or 3 times what I'm going to get and I'm sure they're still not going to be happy with the bill.

    Another reason for not wanting to work in tight crawl spaces:

    I found a little box that I tore open to use to cover some of the mud to put my head on. Afterward, I shined my flashlight on it and it read Rat Poison!!

    This is one reason why plumbers seem so expensive. This is the kind of stuff we put up with on a regular basis.

  14. #14
    Plumber Cass's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Verdeboy
    Why I went with PVC:

    It's cold water. It's a 30 foot run to the outside wall. It's a crawl space with a dirt floor. There's so little clearance, I have to lie on my belly to make a couple of the connections.


    I'll see if I can find a sillcock that can adapt to PVC. I like the idea of a flange to screw into the wall.

    Why wouldn't you have used an approved pipe like CPVC instead of PVC?

  15. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cass
    Why wouldn't you have used an approved pipe like CPVC instead of PVC?
    I thought CPVC was required for hot water/high-pressure applications, and indoors. This application is none of the above--unless an underground crawl space is considered indoors.

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