(206) 949-5683, Top Rated Plumber, Seattle
Results 1 to 14 of 14

Thread: Flooding

Hybrid View

  1. #1

    Default Flooding

    Well, my sis's place floods everytime with heavy rains. Her barn has got over 8 feet, their basement, over 3 to 4. They have sliding glass doors there, and think the water is coming in thru it; will bricking them up stop this in the basement? Would a sump pump help with this amount of flooding? I recommend a sale sign.

  2. #2
    Rancher
    Guest

    Default

    The solution is called a dike, and a gas powered trash pump.

    Rancher

  3. #3

    Default

    Rancher, thank you for responding,

    I am going to ask this, and while asking it, I am laughing, but, what is a dike ? lol. I am thinking about how it relates to the flooding, lol. Could you please explain? Also, the second part, the trash pump, I think you said? Where exactly if you don't mind, would these be used? In the basement, on the inside, or in the stream that is nearby?

    What if anything, would a sump pump do for these people? I had suggested it to her, and she didn't know either. They have a severe flooding problem. Her husband is ill alot of the time, so, he can't do much, unfortunately. It is pretty much up to her. Or can the flooding be so drastic, that a sump pump would be virtually useless?

    Thank you in advance for your response.

  4. #4
    Rancher
    Guest

    Default

    Cookie, a dike, not a dyke...

    A dike is an artificial earthen wall, constructed as a defense or as a boundary. It is also known in American English as a levee. Otherwise known as a berm...

    In other words you build a dry lake to keep the rising water out, I saw one on the news when the Mississippi flooded, I think the guy finally gave up and left by boat.

    A sump pump will most likely not be able to keep up with the water, and where are you going to pump it to?

    A trash pump means it can handle "stuff" in the water and not clog.

    Rancher

  5. #5

    Default

    I never knew there were 2 spellings, lol. I don't read smut, lol.
    So, the sump pump wouldn't do much. I don't know where one would pump it. Everything is pretty much under water right now for her.

    I will have to do a search on that ' berm' lol, you talked about. Honestly asking you this, how large of an area are you talking about when you would build a dry lake? I will look it up. Maybe, she could hire some people, if that would help some.

    A trash pump might help them, alot. They have a tremendous amount of cleanup. Now, Rancher, where would that be at? and, can you explain about it alittle more. Does that need also, somewhere to pump it to?

    I thank you dear sir.

  6. #6
    DIY scratch-pad engineer leejosepho's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    200 miles south of Little Rock
    Posts
    2,474

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Cookie
    Well, my sis's place floods everytime with heavy rains. Her barn has got over 8 feet, their basement, over 3 to 4 ...
    Is her place located in a gulley or depression or at the foot of a hill or anything like that?

    My in-laws once had a similar problem with run-off from a slightly-higher field behind their property. Where the previous farmer had always plowed in a circular pattern to retain the water, the current one plowed toward and away from the back of their house. To resolve that problem when the new farmer refused to change his pattern, my in-laws ended up placing a berm at the back of their property to direct the water into a large ditch alongside.

  7. #7

    Default

    It is pretty flat. But, they do have a stream very nearby, which sometimes, the beavers damn up and wola, makes the problem even worse. Ok, I looked up DYKE, lol, and I think, they tried that with sandbags. It didn't work. They do sandbag if they can ahead of time, around the house, closely around the house; but, that only helps somewhat. They own several acres, I wonder, what if they mowed their grass like you mentioned Lee? Or this berm, what did they use? sandbags, or dirt? Anything else my sis could do? It is pretty bad.

  8. #8
    DIY scratch-pad engineer leejosepho's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    200 miles south of Little Rock
    Posts
    2,474

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Cookie
    They own several acres ...
    How they mow the grass would not affect anything, and I do not know what material(s) my father-in-law had used. But, and unless the house is at the low point of their property, or maybe even if so, I have to believe an experienced landscaping or drainage engineer could come up with a workable plan.

  9. #9

    Default

    Cass,

    Might a drainage engineer help? You saw how high the water, what do you think?

    *What do you think about taking out a sliding glass door and bricking that part of the wall, where she thinks the water is coming in at? Any possiblities on that? Or would that be a waste of time, and money? Does water just come in from under the foundation?
    Last edited by Cookie; 04-17-2007 at 02:21 PM.

  10. #10
    Plumber Cass's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    5,984

    Default

    Moving is sometimes easier.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •