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Thread: well water treatment? Please help.

  1. #16
    DIY scratch-pad engineer leejosepho's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rancher
    Uses "Nonyl phenoxy polyoxyethylene ethanol-iodine complex ".

    Wow... I would assume it is simular to a chlorine injector, except using an iodine disolved in an alchol product.

    By the way it's also used as a teat dip... if you care.
    Well, clean teats could be nice, I suppose, but I happen to be allergic to iodine as well as to alcohol.

    I sent the company an e-mail request for some information since I was not able to open their brochures available on their website, but they have yet to respond. Before going too far here, however, I would have to know what kind of treatment my water might need following theirs.

  2. #17
    That's all folks! Gary Slusser's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by leejosepho
    So then, and with the matter of cost aside for the moment, ozone would be the only way to keep the water in my well free of bacteria without doing any damage to any of the mechanical components of the well?
    I said: What you need to know is all the choices you have in what type of equipment will successfully treat the problem. To treat any type of reducing bacteria, like IRB, you need a disinfectant. They are chlorine, three types of equipment are used for chlorine, or hydrogen peroxide although it doesn't work very well for that type of bacteria problems and requires a solution feeder, or ozone which is generated on site and very expensive.

    Ozone is a disinfectant and the last I mentioned.

    Maxblack said.
    Gary I tried an inline chlorinator (not yours) and after only a few months the internal feeder (suction?) line clogged. I took it apart and the gunk in the line was rock-solid; dunno if from the clorine pellet residue or from hard water. Anyway maybe I was using pellets that were too soft? Pro Chlor-Pel. BTW I couldn't find on your website that you sell your pellets separately online?
    You have to clean mine and I suppose the impostrers' but, you should do it before it gets that bad or runs out of pellets. All pellets do it but some might be worse than others.

    I sell anything anyone could need, I just don't have much of it on my web site.
    Gary Slusser Retired (= out of business)
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  3. #18
    DIY Member MaxBlack's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Slusser
    I sell anything anyone could need...
    Thanks, I'll try to remember that! Oh, wait, you're talking about water treatment stuff...

    Re: cleaning the feeder--yeah everybody (including me I suppose) keeps looking for a trouble-and-maintenance-free solution to their lousy water problems, and I'm learning (too slowly, probably) that such magic does not (yet) exist!

  4. #19
    DIY scratch-pad engineer leejosepho's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Slusser
    Ozone is a disinfectant and the last I mentioned.
    Yes, I heard that, and I am asking about any negative effects from ozone such as with chlorine. My desire and intention is to first apply whatever treatment I need outside the house to protect the mechanical components of my well -- sumbersible pump, screen, etc. -- from whatever might be there to harm it, and to then do anything additional that might be desired/required on the inside of the house in relation to ultimate water quality.

    Do you get involved with well-water testing?

  5. #20
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    Ozone is an unstable form of oxygen. When in contact with things, it oxydizes them and this tears up organic things. One of the biggest natural sources is a thunderstorm. After reacting, it returns to a stable form of oxygen - the stuff you breath.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  6. #21
    That's all folks! Gary Slusser's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by leejosepho
    Yes, I heard that, and I am asking about any negative effects from ozone such as with chlorine. My desire and intention is to first apply whatever treatment I need outside the house to protect the mechanical components of my well -- sumbersible pump, screen, etc. -- from whatever might be there to harm it, and to then do anything additional that might be desired/required on the inside of the house in relation to ultimate water quality.

    Do you get involved with well-water testing?
    AFAIK there is no way to introduce ozone into a well and if there were, it probably would harm drop pipe, pumps etc. as chalorine pellet droppers can.

    You can't protect the casing of a well or the pump, the cable etc. anymore than you can protect your motor vehicle from the environment it is used in; recalling they all wear out and need replacement simply due to being used. And if tried, most if not all that are applied will cause other problems for the casing, pump etc..

    And pressure tanks don't need or require protection from anything found naturally in groundwater. So the best place for treatment equipment is after the pressure tank.

    So find a knowledgeable water treament dealer and go for it.

    I do not test water although I did for 18 years.

    MaxBlack, you're right, trouble-and-maintenance-free water treatment doesn't exist. But some types take a lot less baby sitting than others. You can't get more trouble and maintenance free than my inline pellet chlorinator and mixing tank.
    Gary Slusser Retired (= out of business)
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    CAUTION, as of Nov 12 2013 all YouTube videos showing how to rebuild a Clack valve have an error in them that can cause damage.

  7. #22
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    Gary is correct about putting o-zone into the well. I have a very good customer. A fish farmer who was talked into putting o-zone down his well by means of a 1/4" plastic tube. They injected it right on top of the pump. Well after the pump fell off the pipe and the pipe was full of holes, hot to mention what damage was done to the casing, he removed it. Of course, we had to fish all this half eaten stuff from his well. Same goes with dropping chlorine tablets down a well. Just don't do it, is the best advice I have.

    bob...

  8. #23
    DIY scratch-pad engineer leejosepho's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Slusser
    You can't protect the casing of a well or the pump, the cable etc. anymore than you can protect your motor vehicle from the environment it is used in; recalling they all wear out and need replacement simply due to being used. And if tried, most if not all that are applied will cause other problems for the casing, pump etc...

    So find a knowledgeable water treament dealer and go for it.
    Quote Originally Posted by speedbump
    .... dropping chlorine tablets down a well. Just don't do it, is the best advice I have.
    As far as "knowledgeable" is concerned, I cannot imagine doing better anywhere else than with you folks right here on this forum.

    The man who put in my well for the previous homeowner about 15 years ago has kinda-sorta implied/suggested I might be better off going back to a shallow well, and I might soon drive one on my own and use a pitcher pump just to see what is actually there. But for now, I need to do *something* to keep my submersible pump from being from destroyed by whatever was restricting it and had possibly caused it to trip its breaker last week.

    Could an in-line chlorinator (rather than a pellet dropper) be used to feed a re-circulation line back to the well with a minimal and "just enough" chlorine dose to keep the IRB in check without destroying the PVC well casing, drop pipe and/or my pump for at least a year or two? If so, I would be far ahead of where I am right now with a four-month-old pump I might have just nearly lost, and with possibly my only other option being monthly or bi-monthly shock treatments of chlorine that I can imagine could be even more destructive than a minimal level of continuous chlorination.

    Any thoughts on any of that?

    Note: Last week's shock treatment relieved whatever had been restricting my pump's flow.
    Last edited by leejosepho; 03-23-2007 at 02:18 PM.

  9. #24
    DIY Junior Member Daisy's Avatar
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    Default I have contacted the company

    Quote Originally Posted by leejosepho
    Here is something I just found:

    www.berrysystemsinc.com/products/halovac.html

    Overall, this company claims its system will eliminate/control bacteria within a well as well as to eliminate/reduce slime and scale buildup. If this system does not have any drawbacks similar to those of chlorine injectors, maybe this is the solution here ...
    It is a pellet chlorinator that goes on top of the well itself and sells for $1300.00. What do you think of it now?

  10. #25
    DIY Junior Member Daisy's Avatar
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    Default To sam

    Quote Originally Posted by sammyhydro11
    The first step is get a full chemical analysis of the water.Usualy to properly treat iron bacteria you need a chemical feed chlorinator,carbon backwash filter,and a water softener. The size of the unit will be determined by your analysis.

    SAM
    I have been told by my County water lab that they do not do the kind of analysis that I need and that it will cost appr. $500.00 to have it done by someone else. After a long conversation with them they say that it sounds as if I have Giardia in the well which is very difficult to get rid of. This sounds very pricey to me.

  11. #26
    DIY scratch-pad engineer leejosepho's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Daisy
    I have been told by my County water lab ... that it sounds as if I have Giardia in the well ...
    Here is one possibility I just found:

    http://www.home-water-purifiers-and-...om/giardia.php

  12. #27
    DIY scratch-pad engineer leejosepho's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Daisy
    It is a pellet chlorinator that goes on top of the well ... What do you think of it now?
    I could be wrong, but if Rancher is correct, it does not dispense chlorine ... but either way, I will ultimately have something inside the house to go back out to the well rather than out on the well, itself.

  13. #28
    Previous member sammyhydro11's Avatar
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    Daisy,
    i haven't a clue as to why they are aiming towards Giardia.Did they tell you why they thought that? You said you had a bacterial iron clogging your pump. I suggested getting a full analysis and starting from there. If its an iron bacteria problem and there is nothing else wrong with the water,go with the chemical feed pump chlorinator,carbon backwash filter,post softener. That is what i have used in the past and it works great. If the ph is low you can always mix some soda ash in the chemical feed tank to raise it. The down side to the system is having to mix chemicals every so often. Maybe Gary can help you out with some equipment once you get your analysis or give you some other ideas. Hes the water treatment guru,i'm slowly getting there.

    SAM

  14. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by Daisy
    ..... and that it will cost appr. $500.00 to have it done by someone else. .....This sounds very pricey to me.
    That sounds like a normal price for an extensive water test. They test for all kinds of contaminants that you wouldn't think of, but it is well worth it to know what is in your water....at least when the water sample was taken.

  15. #30
    That's all folks! Gary Slusser's Avatar
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    Only labs think $500 is OK for a water test....

    Daisy, all Class A UV lights treat Giardia cysts. There are class A and B UV lights. Class A cost more but for a say 2.5 bathroom house, you don't need mre than a 15 gpm, so the price is up $750 delivered depending on any options like an intensity monitor but including a prefilter housing, flow control etc..
    Gary Slusser Retired (= out of business)
    Click Here to learn how to correctly size or program a water softener.
    CAUTION, as of Nov 12 2013 all YouTube videos showing how to rebuild a Clack valve have an error in them that can cause damage.

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