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Thread: Hairdressers sink

  1. #1

    Default Hairdressers sink

    Hi, we bought this house about 2 years ago. There is a spare bedroom, and till now we've had no reason to want to remove the sink from the wall. But now we'll be having a guest for 3 months, and I don't believe he will appreciate a sink in his bedroom. Anyway, I have NO clue how to go about removing a sink from the wall. It's never worked. No water has ever come out no matter what little nobby things I turn. Sooo, if anyone has any helpful tips on removing that thing....If it helps there's a little metal plate holding it on, and then obviously a bunch of pips come out the bottom, and into the wall where there is a piece of wood hiding the inside of our wall.
    Thnx
    Ratgirl

  2. #2
    In the Trades Gary Swart's Avatar
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    If this sink was properly installed, it has two shut off valves that small hoses are attached to. These hoses lead to the underside of the "nobby" things on top of the sink. These valves apparently are turned off since no water come out when you turn the knobs. Disconnect the hoses from these valves. The large pipe coming out of the bottom of the sink is the drain. It should go into a P trap then into the wall. This should not be difficult to remove, but the pipe in the wall needs to be plugged to prevent sewer gas from entering the room. It probably already is since the water in the unused P trap has long ago evaporated. The actual removal of the sink from the wall will depend on figuring out exactly how it is supported and doing whatever is necessary. What you are going to be left with is an ugly wall with shut off valves and a drain with a rag stuffed in it. You might be better off to live with the sink unless you want to really get into the job of complete water line and drain line removal which will entail wall opening, a plumber, and carpenter. I say you will need the latter two people because by the nature of you question, you don't have even the basic knowledge of how to do repairs.

  3. #3
    In the Trades Bob NH's Avatar
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    He might appreciate the sink in the bedroom more than you would think; especially if he is an older man who could thereby avoid going down the hall to the bathroom in the middle of the night. You might want to figure out how to get it working.

  4. #4
    In the Trades Gary Swart's Avatar
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    I agree with Bob. It might very well be easier to make it work again than remove it and patch up the wall.

  5. #5
    Homeowner geniescience's Avatar
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    is the drain working?
    Does it drain water?

    -d

  6. #6

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    Personally I very much enjoy having a sink in the bedroom...especially when there are a bunch of females in the house... or you have a need to "clean up" after a round in the sack...it's mighty convenient and makes an excellent vanity and dressing area while freeing up the bathroom. Just hang a mirror over it and make it usable!!!!

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