(206) 949-5683, Top Rated Plumber, Seattle
Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Advice on installing effluent pump

  1. #1

    Default Advice on installing effluent pump

    Can someone give advice on installing an effluent pump in my cellar. It is an add-on cellar and the floor sits about 4' below the main sewer line. I'm guessing i shouldn't tie directly into the main line since if the check valve fails, and my sewer backs up, it would flood my cellar. I'm thinking I should tie into something like a 1 1/2" or 2" sink line from an upstairs sink. Is that correct? And if so, do I need to provide some kind of vent in the assembly or just sweep right into that sink line? Any help would be greatly appreciated!

  2. #2
    DIY scratch-pad engineer leejosepho's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    200 miles south of Little Rock
    Posts
    2,474

    Default

    Does your sewer line go out to a private (septic tank) or public sewage system, how far above that sewer line is your closest toilet or other fixture draining into it, how many toilets and other fixtures do you already have, and what is the overall configuration of your drain plumbing?

    No, you definitely should not tie into any sink drain -- discharging a sump into your main line is likely going to be your best option -- and yes, a new sewage sump will definitely need to be properly vented.

  3. #3

    Default

    My sewer lines drain into the city sewer system, not a septic tank. The closet toilet is just on the floor above the cellar (one story house) and up-stream of the cellar about 20'. There is another fixture (sink) directly above the cellar/pump pit. It is a rather small house with just one bathroom (with one sink, shower, toilet) and the kitchen which only has a kitchen sink (no other drainage needs). The sewage line "starts" at the bathroom and runs down towards the kitchen and my new cellar area, then takes a 90 degree turn and heads out of the crawlspace to the street. It is 3" ABS and other than the bathroom, has two other 1.5" lines sweeping into it. One is the sink above that I already mentioned, and the other is futher down stream and is from the kitchen sink.

    This pump is a Zoeller M-57 effluent pump that is capable of handling up to 1/2" solids. It's main purpose is to pump out water that will run into the pit from a sink that I plan to install and anything that gets washed into the floor drain (mostly just soapy water with very few if any solids).

    Thanks for the advise. From your reply, it sounds like you recommend I just tie directly into the main line and trust the check valve to do it's job in case of a sewage back up.

  4. #4
    DIY scratch-pad engineer leejosepho's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    200 miles south of Little Rock
    Posts
    2,474

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Spauld
    Thanks for the advise. From your reply, it sounds like you recommend I just tie directly into the main line and trust the check valve to do it's job in case of a sewage back up.
    Yes, I believe that is what I would do, but since I am not a professional plumber, you might do well to get a more-qualified opinion.

    Quote Originally Posted by Spauld
    The sewage line "starts" at the bathroom and runs down towards the kitchen and my new cellar area, then takes a 90 degree turn and heads out of the crawlspace to the street. It is 3" ABS and other than the bathroom, has two other 1.5" lines sweeping into it. One is the sink above that I already mentioned ...
    Having heard some more details here, the thought of possibly connecting that sink drain and the sump discharge into one connection sounds more plausible than at first ... but your biggest issue here is proper venting since that sump is going to have a higher flow rate that anything you already have.

    Do any of your existing fixtures have dedicated vents, and/or is there a "main vent" going up through the roof either where your 3" line begins or anywhere else along the way?

  5. #5

    Default

    Yes, in fact the sink drain in question has a vent all to itself, right at the point where it takes a 90 degree dive straight into the 3" main line. I was hoping I could connect in right about there, and use that to vent my cellar pump. Whatta ya think?

  6. #6
    DIY scratch-pad engineer leejosepho's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    200 miles south of Little Rock
    Posts
    2,474

    Default

    Well, that is something I would consider in my own house if necessary, but not through an 1-1/2" connection ... and not without at least some kind of professional opinion or confirmation.

  7. #7

    Default

    Exactly, and that is why I posted this thread, in hopes of getting a professional oppinion. It is good to hear that it is at least plausible, so I appreciate your input. If I don't hear any other advice from this forum, I'll probably just go with your original suggestion and tie in directly to the main line. Thanks again.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •