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Thread: I Need a Soleniod Valve

  1. #1
    DIY Junior Member jgbfl's Avatar
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    Default I Need a Soleniod Valve

    Where is a good place to purchase a 1-1/4'' 24v or 120v soleniod valve?

    I need to connect it to 1-1/4'' CPVC piping.

    Thank you

  2. #2
    Plumber Cass's Avatar
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    What will it be doing?

  3. #3
    DIY Junior Member jgbfl's Avatar
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    This valve will be controlled by a float switch and will close when water in the storage tank has been satisfied.
    A pressure switch will shut down the pump when pressure is met.

    Pump/pressure switch/solenoid valve=float switch/tank

  4. #4

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    Why not control the pump off the float switch. The only way I can think you would not want to do this is if you were trying to pull water before the holding tank. But I donít see a pressure tank in your setup.

    If you had a yard hydrant that you were trying to use off the well pump then you would need your setup to be.
    Pump, pressure tank and switch, float switch and solenoid valve, holding tank.

    If you are set on using a solenoid valve then I would say to over rate the PSI on the valve. If you can find a slow closing valve then you will be better off because of water nock.

  5. #5
    Rancher
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    Quote Originally Posted by jgbfl
    Pump/pressure switch/solenoid valve=float switch/tank
    OK, let me get this straight, the storage tanks gets full, signals to the solenoid valve to close, pressure builds up in the pipe (no pressure tank), pressure switch reaches cutoff and turns off pump.... correct? Why not just have the float switch turn off the pump, thats how most storage tanks are controlled.

    Rancher

  6. #6
    In the Trades Bob NH's Avatar
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    Another way to solve the problem is to install a float valve in the tank. When it closes, the pressure will build up in a pressure tank at the pump and the pressure switch will shut off the pump.

    Large float valve are available and not expensive. Large solenoid valves are expensive unless you are using the pilot-type valves that are used for irrigation systems.

    The advantages of that setup are:
    1. Makes pressure available at the pump for other services.
    2. Allows communication between the open tank and the pump without wire.

    If neither 1 or 2 are requirements, then the float switch is the best solution.

  7. #7

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    Most big stores have Champion 1" inline [not] non siphon valves for irrigation that should flow plenty for your tank. There are other brands also.... there is one made in Nevada that lasts many years - cant define the name, might be the Champion or Genie or toro. Cheaper to use 2 of these than one of the commercial types. I have one on a tank for 5 years now, only have to pull junk from the seat every few years.

  8. #8
    DIY Junior Member jgbfl's Avatar
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    Thank you for your responses,

    To clairify why I need this valve, I will have irrigation on this pump,
    My plan is to control the 115v solenoid valve with the float switch for house water demand in the aeretor tank. The pump is a 3 wire 240v pump and I have yet to find a float switch that will break both hot legs. I have some worry over breaking only 1 hot leg, maybe this is ok but someone here may tell me different.

    So the sloenoid valve will keep the aerator tank full when the house demands water, the pressure switch before the valve will keep the system charged and will run the irrigation when demand is needed.
    Should I use a bladder tank for the irrigation system or perhaps a CSV?
    Thank you

  9. #9

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    You might need to use a relay. A 220 relay can be controlled by 110.

  10. #10
    DIY Junior Member jgbfl's Avatar
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    Would not the 110v rated float switch control this valve?
    A friend of mine has his system set up this way.
    I would use a normally closed valve, when demand was met, valve would close, pump would shut down when pressure was met.
    When water was needed float switch would open valve etc....

  11. #11
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    A switch designed to control high amps can be expensive. A relay controlled by a less expensive switch often ends up being more reliable. Also, you can get time-delay relays to prevent short cycling, or to enforce minimum consecutive cycle time intervals. If the current required for the solonoid is within the specs of the switch, then it should work, though.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  12. #12
    Rancher
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    It is quite common to use a float switch, or electronic liquid level detector to control another relay (contactor) to provide power to the pump, or in your case the pump controller.

    If you haven't already bought your float switch, check out the liquid level detectors, for the probes I use a brass #10 screw in a 3/4" pvc cap, on a pipe down into the storage tank, has worked flawlessly for over 8 years.

    http://www.ssac.com/catalog/LLC51A01.pdf

    I'm not 100% sure, but I bet it violates the NEC to only switch 1/2 of a 240 volt circuit.

    Rancher

  13. #13
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    Keep it simple and safe. Use a solonoid that is 24 volt and actuate the relay with that voltage as well. Besides the 115 volt solonoid for an irrigation valve is about 4 times the price of the 24 volt and the 24 volt solonoid comes with the valve.

    bob...

  14. #14
    DIY Junior Member jgbfl's Avatar
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    The level control sensor looks good but as I already have the float switch I will use it.
    The other consideration is that this 1 pump will provide water for the storage tank as well as the irrigation system. I need to separate the irrigation demand from the storage tank demand. They may or may not call for water at the same time but a solenoid valve is the only way I see to accomplish this.
    The valve will provide water to the tank only when the float switch tells it to.
    With the line charged to 50 psi and the pump controlled by the pressue switch, the irrigation system can operate when ever a zone valve opens.

    I could use a low voltage valve, I am trying to find a reasonably priced distributor for this solenoid valve.

    To ask another question, how well would a Rain Bird irrigation valve perform in this application? I can get an 1-1/2'' 24v valve for $70.00 and they are in stock.
    Last edited by jgbfl; 01-09-2007 at 06:08 AM.

  15. #15
    Rancher
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    The only thing I can find possibly wrong with your idea is that you may want to consider a small pressure tank to provide a little air cushion to save the pump and piping from water hammer when that valve closes.

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