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Thread: PVC Glue Technique Question

  1. #1
    DIY Senior Member molo's Avatar
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    Red face PVC Glue Technique Question

    Hello All,

    I have a question regarding the tolerances of PVC primer/glue joints.
    Last night I was doing some drain work, putting PVC pipe and fittings together. I had put a fitting together and held it tight for about 45 seconds. When I went to connect to it with my next piece I torqued it enough to move the fitting. I then pushed the fitting back into place and held it again for another 45 seconds or so. Today the fitting is very tight (no play) and i have been runngin water through it and it doesn't leak. Is this acceptable?

    TIA,
    Molo

  2. #2
    In the Trades Bob NH's Avatar
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    Technique for cementing PVC pipe joints:

    1. Cut the pipe square and chamfer the inside and outside.
    2. Apply cleaner to both the male and female parts.
    3. Apply cement to both the male and femal parts. No holidays (missed spots)
    4. Insert the male part into the female part while giving it a quarter turn; and hold it for at least 30 seconds.

  3. #3
    In the Trades kordts's Avatar
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    I do almost all service work. I use the blue wet or dry glue for everything. It dries so quick that it's great for ejector and sump pumps and kitchen drains.

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    Master Plumber Dunbar Plumbing's Avatar
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    One thing I always do is after I make up a solvent weld connection, I always take the primer dauber and do a once over completely around the outside of where pipe meets fitting.

    It removes/thins the globs of glue that sometimes oozes out and when the joint is solidified, it almost looks like glue was never used.

    I never use the purple primer...feel sorry for jurisdictions that enforce that.....it looks horrible no matter what you do with it.
    Read what the end of this sentence means.

  5. #5
    DIY Senior Member molo's Avatar
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    Default A Do-over?

    What do you think guys? Did you read the first post? Should I re-do that connection or is it O.K.?

    TIA,
    Molo

  6. #6
    Plumber jimbo's Avatar
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    On a drain, if it tests with no leaks, I would leave it. In hot weather, a pipe would not move after a minute or so. In colder weather, the set up is slower, so moving it at the point that you did probably did not ruin the joint. If this was a pressurized pipe, I would be a little more concerned. And I certainly would want to see a wet test on this joint before it was buried or hidden in a wall.

  7. #7

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    This happened to me. I used a slower setting pvc cement and had to keep pushing it together. Eventually after a couple mins it wouldn't move. It seemed to work fine. However, my inspector required the drains and vents to be filled to 5ft. Under steady, solid pressure, it leaked pretty easily.

    If it were me, I'd be concerned that in the event of a backup, the joint might fail. Therefore, (IIWM), I'd cut the joint out and re-set a new one. I'd either use a quicker setting cement or hold it for a 4-5 minutes before releasing.
    (important note: I'm not a pro)

  8. #8
    Plumber Cass's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RUGGED
    One thing I always do is after I make up a solvent weld connection, I always take the primer dauber and do a once over completely around the outside of where pipe meets fitting.

    It removes/thins the globs of glue that sometimes oozes out and when the joint is solidified, it almost looks like glue was never used.

    I never use the purple primer...feel sorry for jurisdictions that enforce that.....it looks horrible no matter what you do with it.
    RUGGED where did you learn that?

  9. #9

    Default Why chamfer female?

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob NH
    Technique for cementing PVC pipe joints:

    1. Cut the pipe square and chamfer the inside and outside.
    2. Apply cleaner to both the male and female parts.
    3. Apply cement to both the male and femal parts. No holidays (missed spots)
    4. Insert the male part into the female part while giving it a quarter turn; and hold it for at least 30 seconds.
    Why would you chamfer the female part, such as an elbow? Isn't it already chamferred at the factory? I understand if you have to cut an elbow or a coupling in a tight spot it would need to be chamferred.

  10. #10

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    I just cut, knock off any ragged edges, then prime and glue. The welding takes place by melting this stuff together and pretty much melts any small ridges left in the cut area. Perfectly square is nice but really is not necessary if you get a decent weld.
    At one time purple primer was required here just so the inspector could verify that the primer was used. It may be ugly but when it's covered up or hidden under a floor or the dirt no one really cares. I've got to learn to plumb with gloves to keep all that glue off of my hands.

  11. #11
    In the Trades Bob NH's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kd
    Why would you chamfer the female part, such as an elbow? Isn't it already chamferred at the factory? I understand if you have to cut an elbow or a coupling in a tight spot it would need to be chamferred.
    Please notice that I said, "1. Cut the pipe square and chamfer the inside and outside." The subject of the sentence is "pipe". I didn't say anything about fittings in that sentence, which was the ONLY place I mentioned chamfering.

    I want to get rid of burrs that will collect stuff in drain pipes and affect flow in water pipes.

  12. #12
    Master Plumber Dunbar Plumbing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cass
    RUGGED where did you learn that?

    I learned that from the digging/excavation crew for the service plumber I worked for in Cincinnati when I was a union plumber.

    I'd be the one called out to bring the drain cleaning equipment when they were digging up those inner city jobs and found a root ball or dead body in the drain.

    So sometimes I'd have to watch these guys and noticed they were doing this procedure a lot...and asked them why they did it.


    They told me they do it because when dealing cell=core pipe and fittings that the application of primer over the finished joint is a sealer of sorts. It was recommended by the boss on all piping systems whether it was SDR-20, SCH40 or SDR-35.


    Ever since then I've been wiping my solvent weld connections in PVC and it's a habit I can't break because the finished product looks so good.

    It really looks like the pipe and fittings are dry-fitted it looks so clean.


    Hard habits are hard to break; I don't even work much with it anymore, a 1/2 quart of glue/cleaner will go bad through the year before I need to replace it with new. <<<< I'm glad to not be around it anymore. I can thank being in the service side of plumbing for that.
    Read what the end of this sentence means.

  13. #13
    That's all folks! Gary Slusser's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RUGGED
    One thing I always do is after I make up a solvent weld connection, I always take the primer dauber and do a once over completely around the outside of where pipe meets fitting.

    It removes/thins the globs of glue that sometimes oozes out and when the joint is solidified, it almost looks like glue was never used.
    Since you get globs, you haven't been following the directions stating a thin full covering coat only.

    And I suppose you then reuse that dauber to clean other fittings before solvent welding them. Any idea what problems contaminated cleaner might cause joints?

    I would err on the side of caution and not reuse that dauber for cleaning but then, I've never paid much attention to pretty, I always go for the practical over beauty. That's what I would tell anyone complaining about how it 'looks'; "ya want it to look pretty or work right?".

    And there's only one way to 'do it right', and that's to do it right the first time rather than wiping away evidence of my sloppiness and/or mistakes. I take the time to do it right the first time and save untold hours undoing things. I learned that just before I was 18 in explosives handling where it's guaranteed that your first mistake is your (and your buddies) last.

    You're much better off leaving it look like it was glued (read proving it) than not... And since the cleaner thins disturbs dilutes and probably breaks the surface tension of, the 'glue' in the chamfered area, that might not be a good idea either.
    Gary Slusser Retired (= out of business)
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    CAUTION, as of Nov 12 2013 all YouTube videos showing how to rebuild a Clack valve have an error in them that can cause damage.

  14. #14
    Master Plumber Dunbar Plumbing's Avatar
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    Okay internet plumber, I'm wrong. Now go sell something.


    Might I add a bit of valued knowledge:


    Years ago when cell-core came to the area the owners of supply houses were telling us plumbers to apply glue heavily on the ends of the piping AND wipe those outsides with cleaner because the air tests to pass inspections on the 1st 2nd and final roughs were failing as a result of compressed air travelling inside the cellular structure of the pipe. I recall the late 80's.

    Charlotte piping foundry sent out letters to the supply houses in the area stating this issue is arising since it is nearly impossible in the building phases of construction that a water source would be readily available to do a water test on the DWV system. IT was then the responsibility of the seller to let us new construction plumbers know because I'm sure the problems existing with the new style of piping could have a damaging PR effect down to the mfg. There, I said it. It's on the internet. I'm so glad I have let this off my chest as I've been holding it back for years...


    So who's right, the mfg. years ago or one gary slusser. Find out on the next maury povich show.
    Last edited by Dunbar Plumbing; 01-05-2007 at 10:40 AM.
    Read what the end of this sentence means.

  15. #15

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    I'm gonna keep doing it my way.... waste alot of glue... It has worked for the last 30 years and I've never had a complaint about how pretty it looks. And, I don't have problems with leaks or blow outs.

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