(206) 949-5683, Top Rated Plumber, Seattle
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 16 to 30 of 41

Thread: Where Should the Whole House Filter Go?

  1. #16
    DIY Member ddmoit's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    SE Tennessee
    Posts
    52

    Default

    I'm told that my well is 88' deep. I assume that the whole length is galvanized pipe that is 40+ years old.

    Would anyone care to make a (big) ball park estimate of what it might cost me to have the well re-piped? I'm 3/4 of a mile from Lake Michigan, and my soil is sandy for probably most of that 88'.
    Dan in SE Tennessee

  2. #17
    vaplumber
    Guest

    Default

    You dont want any thing between the pump and the tank. First your adding a restriction. No filter will flow what the pump can produce. Second if the filter starts to clog, then you got trouble. Add the filter after the tank. On one hand I agree with all about treatment, and forget the filter, on the other hand, Ive seen some simple filters make a big improvement.

  3. #18
    DIY Member ddmoit's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    SE Tennessee
    Posts
    52

    Default

    Thanks, vaplumber.

    I don't know what I'm going to do yet, but I will definitely not be putting a filter between the pump and the pressure tank based on the feedback from this board.

    I'm just about convinced that I have rusting galvanized pipes. I'm not sure what to do about it. For under $1,500, I can hook up to city water and abandon the well. I kind of like being "off the grid" so to speak though. I'd prefer to keep this well going if I can. I believe the water quality and quantity are good. My means of getting it is the problem.
    Dan in SE Tennessee

  4. #19
    Previous member
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Riverview, Fl.
    Posts
    4,540

    Default

    You must be somewhere near Silver Lake Dunes. My old Dune Buggy stomping grounds.

    I doubt you will find anyone to work on that old well as far as repiping. You will need to get a new well drilled. I don't know what they are charging there these days. I moved from Michigan 25 years ago.

    No problem Gary, I just know what works here and for some reason softeners with the iron removal goodies won't take out all the iron here. I have no idea why, but believe me I have tried to use just softners for hardness and iron and had nothing but complaints, from the wife too when I experimented with her blonde hair.

    bob...

  5. #20

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by speedbump
    It's a good idea to call a pro. Galvanized pipe don't rust and the rust off a black iron pipe wouldn't be enough for you to notice. You have iron in your water.

    bob...
    Wow man... I hate to disagree with you on that... The galvanized coating only slows down the rust. I've pulled out lots and lots of pipe over 20-30 years old that were nothing but rust with very little galvanizing left on them. For me... I'd never put metal pipe in the ground unless specified by the customer.

  6. #21
    Previous member
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Riverview, Fl.
    Posts
    4,540

    Default

    I think you will find the rust is on the outside of the galvanized. If not, we must be buying different brands of pipe. About the only place I see rust on galvanized pipe is where a pipe wrench has chewed through the galvanize coating or where the pipe was rubbing something. I also see holes in a lot of galvanized pipe. This is not rust, it's electrolysis.

    bob...

  7. #22
    That's all folks! Gary Slusser's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Wherever I park the motorhome.
    Posts
    6,790

    Default

    It must be different areas of the country. I've seen 1" galvanized so rusted inside you can't see noon time sun through a 2" piece of it. I think galvanized should be outlawed, it's awful stuff. lol
    Gary Slusser Retired (= out of business)
    Click Here to learn how to correctly size or program a water softener.
    CAUTION, as of Nov 12 2013 all YouTube videos showing how to rebuild a Clack valve have an error in them that can cause damage.

  8. #23
    Previous member
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Riverview, Fl.
    Posts
    4,540

    Default

    I've seen it that way too, but it was rust that was deposited there not rust from the pipe itself. Kinda like the plumbing in an old house I lived in years ago.

    The reason I like galvanized so much is we can stack 42 feet of it up through our stacking hoop on the pump hoist. This way it never touches the ground (you know what dogs do on that ground) and it makes for a lot faster swap out on a pump replacement. I also like it because if a pump gets stuck in the well for any number of reasons, I can usually get it out. With PVC or Poly, forget it.

    bob...

  9. #24
    vaplumber
    Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ddmoit
    Thanks, vaplumber.

    I don't know what I'm going to do yet, but I will definitely not be putting a filter between the pump and the pressure tank based on the feedback from this board.

    I'm just about convinced that I have rusting galvanized pipes. I'm not sure what to do about it. For under $1,500, I can hook up to city water and abandon the well. I kind of like being "off the grid" so to speak though. I'd prefer to keep this well going if I can. I believe the water quality and quantity are good. My means of getting it is the problem.
    I wouldnt abandon the well for that reason. Chances are if the inground pipe is galvanized you also have galvanized in the house and you probably will still have the problem if it is caused by the pipe. You could install water treatment for less to close to this amount, clean up your water and not have a monthly water bill. IF you abandon the well and are not happy your chances of the county or city allowing you to restore the well may be slim to none. Play with the well a little if you can afford it, and if you aint happy then abandon the well. If you have galvanize plumbing that is the cause of your trouble then youll probably need the water treatment anyway.

  10. #25
    vaplumber
    Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by speedbump
    The reason I like galvanized so much is we can stack 42 feet of it up through our stacking hoop on the pump hoist. This way it never touches the ground (you know what dogs do on that ground) and it makes for a lot faster swap out on a pump replacement. I also like it because if a pump gets stuck in the well for any number of reasons, I can usually get it out. With PVC or Poly, forget it.

    bob...
    I do agree with this.

  11. #26
    DIY scratch-pad engineer leejosepho's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    200 miles south of Little Rock
    Posts
    2,474

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Slusser
    The best naked eyes can not see particles less than 50-45 microns and most people use 5 and less micron cartridges! So why filter out such fine particles that no one can see?
    I hear you there, Gary, yet there is definitely a visible difference now that we are using filters finer than 20 micron. It used to be that when I filled a glass with water and held it to the light I could see many somethings swirling around, but now I do not. Maybe there is some other explanation for that?

    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Slusser
    Then they plug up much easier and cause pressure losses that kill softener resin.
    We have gauges on each side of each filter to watch for that, but so far our filters end up being changed when our water begins tasting a little sour even though there is no noticable pressure drop across either filter.

    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Slusser
    Also, soluble iron, manganese etc. (like sugar in iced tea - a soluble), go right through them to continue to cause staining and other problems.
    Yes, I understand, but now whatever staining we might have is no longer visible in our fixtures between routine weekly-or-so cleanings.

    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Slusser
    You should get a water analysis and then a correctly sized softener that can handle your amount of iron and manganese if any, or a separate iron filter (both should use a Clack WS-1 control valve). I don't like manganese greensand (sorry Bob) due to the need for potassium permanganate. I use a specially built softener on up to 5 ppm of iron and have been for the past 20 years with great success.
    Until my wife and I might be able to afford that, our only other option seems to be averaging around a dollar a month for filters!

  12. #27
    DIY Member ddmoit's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    SE Tennessee
    Posts
    52

    Default

    Vaplumber,

    To be clear, the rest of the house is entirely copper starting at the pressure tank outlet. Between the pressure tank and the pump I have about 4 feet of some kind of black plastic that was put there recently by the guy who replaced my pressure tank. All my galvanized is on the other side of the pump.
    Dan in SE Tennessee

  13. #28
    That's all folks! Gary Slusser's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Wherever I park the motorhome.
    Posts
    6,790

    Default

    Good water has no taste, it's the things in water that give it a good or bad taste..

    Sediment cartridges at a buck/month... I buy at deeply discounted wholesale prices and I can't buy a 20 mic let alone 5 mic or lower for a buck even at 40/case prices. Staining is evidence of a soluble like iron or tannin in the water. Sediment cartridges do not remove or reduce them. And I haveto disagre with Bob on galvanized not rusting internally. I've seen it with holes in it and a very thin wall in spots (from bacteria probably). In my experience with it, which is limited, it usually causes water quality problems like adding iron to the water and taste/odor problems.
    Gary Slusser Retired (= out of business)
    Click Here to learn how to correctly size or program a water softener.
    CAUTION, as of Nov 12 2013 all YouTube videos showing how to rebuild a Clack valve have an error in them that can cause damage.

  14. #29

    Default

    I think I'll take some pictures next time I see it...but I've pulled pipes out of walls with chunks of black and brown rust on the inside of the pipes which had them totally clogged and unusable...and the outside was just old and dusty looking with no rust. I've pulled them out of the ground with pitted rust on the outside and the same condition on the inside as I just described. When the get pin holes in them then because of the venturi effect of moving water they pull in the muddy water surrounding the pipe and cause a strange tasting water.... maybe speedbump hasn't seen this...but then maybe we just have different pipes in Alabama?????? I do know that the long term effect of water moving over metal is that the water will eat it away one molecule at a time....and when minerals are mixed with it then it happens faster.

  15. #30
    DIY scratch-pad engineer leejosepho's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    200 miles south of Little Rock
    Posts
    2,474

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Slusser
    Good water has no taste, it's the things in water that give it a good or bad taste..
    Sure, and while I do not know what is actually going on to cause this, our water tastes just fine unless we go too long between filter changes when it can get pretty rank even though the filters still have plenty of flow. That has only happened once, though, and that was with a high-dollar sediment filter I had been told could last up to a year before restricting flow. It did just fine in that category, but somehow it had become quite sour.

    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Slusser
    Sediment cartridges at a buck/month... I buy at deeply discounted wholesale prices and I can't buy a 20 mic let alone 5 mic or lower for a buck even at 40/case prices.
    I look around for deals, and I got our last batch of (10) 5-micron polys and (25) .5-micron yarn for a grand total of $2.00 each, including shipping, knowing we can go at least 3 months before changing either ... and just now remembering we do have two 10-inchers together in one 20" housing, yes, I guess that could kick me up to about a buck and a quarter per month, eh?!

    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Slusser
    Staining is evidence of a soluble like iron or tannin in the water. Sediment cartridges do not remove or reduce them.
    Okay, if you say so, but my wife is sure happy to not have to scrub like she used to!

    If I could afford to do so, I would buy some stuff from you in a heartbeat, Gary. But at least for now, I can only do the best I can do while spending just as little as possible.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •