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Thread: Need Some Advice for Washing Machine Drain

  1. #1

    Default Need Some Advice for Washing Machine Drain

    Hey guys! I have a unique situation and I'll do my best to describe it. I have an older Cape style home, when we moved in 3 years ago, the washer hookups were on one side of the basement and the dryer is on the other. I would like to put them together side by side. But to do so, I need to move the washer over to the dryer because that will be in the utility room once the basement is refinished. Now the questions:

    I have town sewer and the outlet pipe does not go under the slab, it exists about 3-ft above the slab through the foundation wall. Since the washer drain already existed, I just want to extend the pipe 15 ft along the wall. When I do this, I will be at 4.5 feet about the floor to where I need the washer to be. Washer manual says its needs a 1.5 discharge pipe and a max height of 5-ft. Given that, how am I suppose to construct a standpipe? I certainly can't make the 18-inch number that I think the code says.

    That being said, if I remove the p trap, do I still need to vent that line? Do I really need the p-trap (I assume I do for plumbing code) I can install the vent basically 2-ft downstream of the p trap via a tee and I can then run through the floor joist and connect to the stack.

    I don't have to worry about siphoning, but I am concerned about this standpipe. Another thing the washing machine instructions state is to not seal the pipe that the hose connects into? If I don't do that, water will surely dump out of the short stand pipe that is there now.

    Sorry for the long post, I just tried my best describe everything. Let me know your thoughts. Thanks in advance!

    Joey

  2. #2
    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
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    An unvented washer drain can cause problems for other fixtures.
    In my brothers cabin, it caused the kitchen sink to back up with nice gooey stuff.

    I have also seen washer hoses that were sealed to the drain.
    To get it to drain right, I had to drill some holes in the plug.
    They are right, don't seal it. They even make a fitting with small holes that clamp a hose to the drain for just that reason, you need some air movement.

    You do need a trap, and a vent for it.
    This isn't really new stuff here anymore. It's how it's done.

    If you need more height, you can go with a basin and pump.
    The washer has a pump, it would be adding one more to get the water up higher.

    Here is a link on washer drains
    Last edited by Terry; 12-20-2006 at 02:07 PM.

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by Terry
    An unvented washer drain can cause problems for other fixtures.
    In my brothers cabin, it caused the kitchen sink to back up with nice gooey stuff.

    I have also seen washer hoses that were sealed to the drain.
    To get it to drain right, I had to drill some holes in the plug.
    They are right, don't seal it. They even make a fitting with small holes that clamp a hose to the drain for just that reason, you need some air movement.

    You do need a trap, and a vent for it.
    This isn't really new stuff here anymore. It's how it's done.

    If you need more height, you can go with a basin and pump.
    The washer has a pump, it would be adding one more to get the water up higher.
    Terry,

    Thanks for the reply. I really appreciate your advice. I think I can still make it work. I looked at it again this morning, I can probably get the standpipe to about 15-inches, and be right at the max for the washing pump. If need be, I could always make a platform for it and raise it up a bit.

    Another noob question, the existing vent line is currently routed in between the floor joists and connects into the vent stack. The line is pretty flat and I am wondering if the vent line also needs a pitch to it or can it be flat. It almost looks like it may have a slight negative slope before it hits the stack.

    Joey

  4. #4
    In the Trades Gary Swart's Avatar
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    Vents should always have a slight slope to drain any water that might get into it.

  5. #5
    In the Trades Gary Swart's Avatar
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    Sorry, submitted last post to quickly. Drain lines need at least 1/4" per foot slope.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Swart
    Sorry, submitted last post to quickly. Drain lines need at least 1/4" per foot slope.
    Thanks for the info. My drain line has the correct pitch. I can make the vent work. Thanks.

    Joey

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