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Thread: My saddle valve is dripping.

  1. #1

    Post My saddle valve is dripping.

    Leaking Saddle Valve

    I have a leaking saddle valve with a bucket under it. Itís no longer in use. It is capped off.

    It is just above my water shut off, so I removed the cap to drain the line while doing a little plumbing. I replaced the cap and turned the water back on. It will not stop leaking from just below the cap. I have tightened the cap and every other aspect of the valve.

    I know you hate saddle valves and I know you would cut off the section of pipe with the hole in it and replace it. I donít need to hear a criticism of the saddle valve I hate them as much you, if not more. Iím not cutting in to my water line tonightÖ

    So what is the third reply? Is there a way to stop the drip for a few days while I study the situation? Is there some sort of saddle clamp that has no valve and would plug the hole? Would replacing the cap with a little teflon tape on the threads stop the dipping for the time being. The drip drip drip is driving me insane.

  2. #2
    In the Trades Gary Swart's Avatar
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    Since you already know what the real answer is, I won't go into a diatribe about saddle valves. Is there a temporary stopgap? I don't know. You're free to try anything that comes to mind. At last resort, a big bucket until you can do the job right.

  3. #3

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    Any ideas for a stopgap that would stop the drip? I need the lambs to stop screaming.


    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Swart
    Since you already know what the real answer is, I won't go into a diatribe about saddle valves. Is there a temporary stopgap? I don't know. You're free to try anything that comes to mind. At last resort, a big bucket until you can do the job right.

  4. #4

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    I'm not clear on what you refer to as a "cap" but I'm assuming you are talking about the nut around the valve stem. If so, you can take a shot at wrapping string around the valve stem (under the nut) and for good measure use some teflon tape or pipe dope on the threads. If you are talking about the cap being the part of the saddle that the valve is attached to then what has happened is that the rubber gasket has shifted or a bit out of alignment. You might be able to adjust it a little or replace it with a chunk of thick rubber (I've actually used a piece of bicycle inner tube before)... anything that works... creative engineering....

  5. #5
    DIY Senior Member Phil H2's Avatar
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    If you must have a temporary repair, you could try a repair clamp. They come in varirious styles. Here is the first one I saw on a quick internet search http://www.jcmindustries.com/111%20f...r%20clamps.pdf

  6. #6
    In the Trades Gary Swart's Avatar
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    It seems to me you might spend more time monkeying with a temporary patch that may or may not hold than if you just cut the saddle valve out, and repair it right the first time. I hate so called temporary fixes, because they always seem to come back an bite me on the butt at the worst time possible.

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