Well Picture Thread

Discussion in 'Pumps and Tanks Well Forum & Blog' started by akcooper9, Jun 2, 2014.

  1. akcooper9

    akcooper9 New Member

    Messages:
    25
    Location:
    North Texas
    Post up your pictures of your wells!

    My dad's rental house well pump went out. Here is a shot of the drop pipe being pulled up.

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    Here is a shot of the new pump doing its job

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  2. valveman

    valveman Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    4,579
    Location:
    Lubbock, Texas
    I made this thread a "sticky" so maybe others will add some pictures.
  3. akcooper9

    akcooper9 New Member

    Messages:
    25
    Location:
    North Texas
    I picked up a CSV160 from Valveman. Had it installed and working in 30 minutes. Love the fact I can run a hose for however long I want and the pump never shuts off!

    2014-08-05 19.01.25.jpg
  4. greenmonster304

    greenmonster304 New Member

    Messages:
    21
    Location:
    Hampton Bays, NY
    I plumbed this up last week for an irrigation system that i installed i requested the driller provide cycle stop brand valve but he gave me the flowmatic instead. The pump is a 15 hp that makes about 175 gpm

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  5. valveman

    valveman Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    4,579
    Location:
    Lubbock, Texas
    [​IMG]

    Should have made him take it back and get you what you ask for. Here is a picture of what the diaphragm in that valve will look like in a few months when it quits working. Those type diaphragms are OK for an open/close type valve like a solenoid. But when you regulate the flow with them the half ball shape diaphragm will migrate downstream until it looks like a football, then it is no longer able to close off as needed.

    I see a few installation errors as well, which won’t help.

    But for a while it works great, because it is about as close to a real CSV as you can get.
  6. valveman

    valveman Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    4,579
    Location:
    Lubbock, Texas
    [​IMG]

    I thought I should show a diaphragm from a real CSV for comparison. This type has rigid sidewalls that act as a shaft. The inside of the valve is made to work like a bushing for the shaft to fit in. As the diaphragm moves up and down this configuration keeps it from migrating downstream, so it last a long time. The Devil is always in the details.
  7. greenmonster304

    greenmonster304 New Member

    Messages:
    21
    Location:
    Hampton Bays, NY
    What errors do you see?
  8. valveman

    valveman Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    4,579
    Location:
    Lubbock, Texas
    [​IMG]

    I would certainly recommend you install a Cycle Sensor. Constant Pressure Valve systems use a big pump working with a small pressure tank. In your case you have a 175 GPM pump and a tank that holds about 15 gallons of water. When the valve in a Constant Pressure Valve system malfunctions, the pressure tank can be filled in about 5 seconds and the pump will shut off. Then because you are using a lot of water, the tank will be empty in about 10 seconds and the pump will be restarted. You won’t know the pump is cycling 4 rimes a minute because the sprinklers will still be working. But in a very short time the motor or something will be burned up from cycling.

    The Cycle Sensor looks for run time and will shut off the pump the first time it cycles too quickly. This will save your pump. Then you can replace that valve with one that won’t cause that problem. Your picture would look much better and you would be much happier if that valve were red instead of blue.
  9. greenmonster304

    greenmonster304 New Member

    Messages:
    21
    Location:
    Hampton Bays, NY
    Believe me I did not want to set up the way it is but I am just irrigation contractor. I told the manager of the site what type of well we needed and I had The well contractor that I typically use give a price for cycle stop valve and 80 gallon tank which would've been set up properly but they chose to go with a different contractor for the well and left me with the blue valve and I took it from there.
  10. greenmonster304

    greenmonster304 New Member

    Messages:
    21
    Location:
    Hampton Bays, NY
    How and where does the cycle sensor get wired
  11. valveman

    valveman Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    4,579
    Location:
    Lubbock, Texas
    Three phase Cycle Sensors just go in the pump panel with the starter.

    Typical bait and switch, happens to me all the time. But its OK because it is supposed to be "just like a Cycle Stop Valve". Yeah right! I just wanted to make sure everyone knows the difference, because after a few months I usually get a call about that “blankety blank” Cycle Stop Valve not working when the pump is burned up. After a few hours of troubleshooting I finally find out it is a blue valve instead of a red one, then I know what the problem is.

    At least they are using the right method, they just need the right product.
  12. akcooper9

    akcooper9 New Member

    Messages:
    25
    Location:
    North Texas
    VM up in Oklahoma I noticed their water towers dont have a 'bubble' up top like we do here in Texas. (see below)

    Are they using CSV's?????

    2014-08-23 10.18.32.jpg
  13. valveman

    valveman Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    4,579
    Location:
    Lubbock, Texas
    Sorry I missed this. No that is called a standpipe. It is about as worthless as mammary glands on a boar hog. At least the little “bubble” on top of the towers supplies a little water. A stand pipe has to be tall enough to get the pressure the city wants. (2.31’ = 1PSI) So 115’ tower gives 50 PSI, but delivers very little water. Every time the top 10’ is drained down, the pump(s) have to cycle again.

    If it had a CSV it would only need an 80 gallon bladder tank to supply the entire city. You wouldn’t see the little tank, the city would not have had to spend $200,000 on that standpipe, the pumps would not be cycling and would last much longer, the city would have constant pressure, which would eliminate line breaks and save a lot of water and save more money.

    But the people who make towers and standpipes would be out of a job. They wouldn’t need construction crews to fix broken lines or engineers to design crappy systems. When the CSV takes that kind of money out of construction and maintenance of a water system, there is a lot of resistance. You would think it would be the other way around.

    I had one city water manager tell me, “boy, don’t you know water towers and standpipes are where our pressure comes from?” Since pressure comes from the pumps and the water wouldn’t even be able to get up the water tower without a pump, I realized I couldn’t fix stupid, said thanks for your time, and just walked away.
  14. valveman

    valveman Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    4,579
    Location:
    Lubbock, Texas
    The following is an email I got from a guy who paints and repairs water towers. He normally uses pressure relief valves on fire hydrants and lets the excess water run down the street while he is working on the towers. He had calculated that they would waste $40,000.00 worth of water while he painted the tower in Hooks, TX. He found us on the Internet. I guaranteed it to work so he tried it. This system does not even have a little 80 gallon tank. The CSV’s on those two pumps just feed the right amount of water to the city. Those pumps with the CSV’s can deliver as little as 5 GPM or as much as 1600 GPM to the city at constant pressure, without any kind of water tower or tank.


    Re; Hooks, Texas
    Cary, the valves are working perfectly. They had a major water leak yesterday and the valves performed as planned. They have not had any complaints about water pressure at all. I wish I would have known about these years ago. The city personal and the engineers are very impressed. I have also included pics of the instillation.
    Thanks,
    Carey Gould
    PROTECTIVE LININGS & COATINGS, INC.15156 Country Place Alexander, Arkansas 72002
    [​IMG]
  15. craigpump

    craigpump Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,074
    Location:
    ct
    Fun job we did yesterday.

    Removed OLD Myers verticle jet (that still ran) and galvanized tank both possibly original to the house which was built in 1942. Extended the casing, installed submersible, new offsets and WX255.

    Attached Files:

  16. akcooper9

    akcooper9 New Member

    Messages:
    25
    Location:
    North Texas
    Awesome pictures! Thanks for sharing
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