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View Full Version : painting trim, baseboards, and kitchen cabinets.



JohnyChevyEG
11-25-2006, 12:54 AM
Team, I am about to take on the task of painting all the trim, and kitchen cabinets in my house. Currently the trim is a stain, with a shiny surface coat of something, i'm not 100 percent sure, i'm not a painter expert. The kitchen cabinets are the same I believe. Whats the best way to go about this? Should I completely sand off the original stuff or can I just paint over it after cleaning real good. I'm going to paint this stuff bright white. I never see them resanding on HGTV, so i'm just curious. If I have to sand, i'm probably going to end up just buying new baseboard trim, so I can get larger than 4 inch trim. Thanks in advance.

jadnashua
11-25-2006, 06:32 AM
THe instructions on the can of paint will often say to sand enough to dull the finish. It would probably also be a good idea to use a primer first, too. Make sure to clean the surface well after sanding.

jimbo
11-25-2006, 07:24 AM
Liquid sandpaper or TSP are usually good enough prep. These surfaces will then definiely need a primer. The best bet is a good oil base primer, then best quality acrylic latex topcoat.

Bob NH
11-25-2006, 01:23 PM
When I refinished my cabinets the last time I used one of the High Volume Low Pressure (HVLP) sprayers. I was using polyurethane and thinned it a bit. It was a better finish that was possible with a brush.

I removed all of the cabinet doors and did them flat. I masked the cabinets pretty good and used the HVLP for the frames as well.

I used the $69 sprayer from HD. I don't know how it will work on the thicker paints.

HoneySuckle
11-25-2006, 09:58 PM
I sanded forever and put about 3 coats of primer then 3 of pain and it never really adhered well to the previously stained doors. Someone said once the wood was stained you can't ever get a good painted finish.

jimbo
11-26-2006, 06:02 AM
I don't agree with honeysuckle. Sorry, don't know where your job went wrong, but if you are careful to remove any wax finish, and the TSP will do that, and use a very good oil base primer, I have had good success with this.

This is where you should go out to the best paint store in town ( not the box stores) and talk to one of their experts. He will fix you up with all the proper material.

Bob NH
11-26-2006, 10:36 AM
When working on kitchen cabinet doors you always have to be concerned about grease. I use mineral spirits and steel wool to clean before doing anything.

You can buy paint thinner, mineral spirits, or Coleman fuel to use as cleaner. Unleaded gasoline will also work but sometimes has nasty additives.

You should do the work outside or use very small amounts inside, unless you plan to collect on your fire insurance and maybe your life insurance.

SteveW
11-26-2006, 02:57 PM
Automotive paint stores sell a 3M wax remover product which also works quite well for removing oil, grease, etc.

maddfrog
11-27-2006, 09:45 AM
I painted my kitchen cabinets a couple of years ago. I sanded just enough to remove the gloss and then primed with Kilz to prevent the original stain from bleeding through the top coat.

I top-coated with Sherwin Williams ProClassic latex using a brush. I was amazed at how well it leveled - almost no brush marks. With a coat of Kilz and two topcoats of ProClassic, you can still see the grain in the door panels. Never would have thought that was possible with a brush. I've even had several people ask me what kind of sprayer I used...

It also comes in an oil-based version.

Randyj
11-27-2006, 10:04 PM
Mineral spirits, steel wool, wipe down really good, KILZ. If you want to eliminate the brush strokes a sponge brush works pretty good but they don't hold up too well.

HoneySuckle
03-06-2007, 08:41 AM
I don't agree with honeysuckle. Sorry, don't know where your job went wrong, but if you are careful to remove any wax finish, and the TSP will do that, and use a very good oil base primer, I have had good success with this.

This is where you should go out to the best paint store in town ( not the box stores) and talk to one of their experts. He will fix you up with all the proper material.



I followed what a contractor told me to do and did check with Sherwin Williams, Benjamin Moore dealer and the Big box stores. So these people told me that with Oak I had to go through all that pain. How was I to know better?:confused: Besides, I can't work with oil based anything so I used latex. Maybe this is why it did not adhere properly?

coz
03-06-2007, 05:30 PM
benjamin moore fresh start is what the pros use