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ericp
12-19-2012, 05:12 PM
The metal ring on my closet flange was rusted away. I cut off the top of the flange with a dremel, which left about 2 inches remaining around the outside of the waste pipe. When I couldn't get the rest of the ABS off of the pipe, I Googled and learned about solvent welding.

I have no idea how to fix this and would greatly value your suggestions. The waste pipe is 3 inch ABS. I bought a 3 inch inside fit ABS flange. But, I've read that this size flange is to be avoided. It has a plastic ring, also best to avoid.

Any ideas would be gratefully received.

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jadnashua
12-19-2012, 06:25 PM
Too bad you cut off all that...they make repair rings that you could have used and not be in this situation. One type is hinged and would have fit in the notch the old one fit into, others are just a ring that can be bolted down to hold the flange bolts. How much height of straight pipe have you got to work with? If it's enough, you can pick up an inside pipe cutter (essentially a small circular saw on a shaft) to cut off enough, then glue on a coupling, a short piece of pipe, and a new flange. You could try to cut vertical notches in the flange, then trying to peel it off. If the joint is well done, it will damage the vertical piece of pipe, but maybe not enough to prevent a decent seal. If you have access or can gain it from underneath, you could maybe cut out more if required.

Gary Swart
12-19-2012, 08:15 PM
This may be beyond your ability to repair. You will certainly be time and probably money ahead if you call a plumber to install a new flange properly. Sometimes the best advice a DIY can get is to know when it's time to call for help.

dlarrivee
12-19-2012, 08:47 PM
Access from below the concrete slab Jim?

If you cannot find a plumber with some very specific tools you're going to be renting a jack hammer and taking up that floor.

ericp
12-20-2012, 08:13 AM
There is about 3.5 inches of straight pipe. Then, it starts curving towards the wall. But, about 1-1.5 inches of the straight pipe appears to be inside of an elbow fitting. There is 2 inches of flange remaining. So, if I cut off the straight pipe just below the flange, then I'll be right at the top of the elbow fitting.

wptski
12-20-2012, 08:54 AM
There is about 3.5 inches of straight pipe. Then, it starts curving towards the wall. But, about 1-1.5 inches of the straight pipe appears to be inside of an elbow fitting. There is 2 inches of flange remaining. So, if I cut off the straight pipe just below the flange, then I'll be right at the top of the elbow fitting.
That would leave you with a portion of the straight piece inside the elbow, correct? You'd have to remove that to replace the straight piece. I've seen cutters powered by a hand drill to remove that but that was on much smaller PVC pipe.

cacher_chick
12-20-2012, 09:21 AM
It would cost you almost nothing to try the inside fitting flange and see if you have problems flushing over the next couple of weeks. If you are not happy with results, you cut the slab so that the closet bend and flange can be replaced properly.

jadnashua
12-20-2012, 11:11 AM
Access from below the concrete slab Jim?



Can't tell if it is thinset around there from the tile, or concrete. There may or may not be enough room for a coupling if you cut it off inside. If you can get the flange out of there, you can use something like a RamBit to bore out the socket of the fitting below so you can glue a new one in. The cost of the tools may make it expedient to call a plumber, although the pieces aren't all that expensive. Depends on exactly what you have and where it is. Plus, would you ever use the tool(s) again? IF so, then the cost per use goes down, maybe way down.

ericp
12-21-2012, 05:08 PM
Thanks for all of your responses. The RamBit idea sounds like a good solution. I'll let you know if the plumber goes that route. Considering how slow I work plus the cost of fixing my mistakes, it's probably more cost effective to call a professional. Thanks again.

wptski
12-21-2012, 07:02 PM
Can't tell if it is thinset around there from the tile, or concrete. There may or may not be enough room for a coupling if you cut it off inside. If you can get the flange out of there, you can use something like a RamBit to bore out the socket of the fitting below so you can glue a new one in. The cost of the tools may make it expedient to call a plumber, although the pieces aren't all that expensive. Depends on exactly what you have and where it is. Plus, would you ever use the tool(s) again? IF so, then the cost per use goes down, maybe way down.
Ah! That's what you call that tool.