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MikeQ
07-24-2012, 07:16 AM
I'm replacing the drain flange (ABS pipe) to install a tile floor.

Are any brands/types better than others or is it pretty much a standard product regardless of the floor covering? Does anyone make one with an eccentric offset so the drain position can be adjusted a half inch or so in any direction without re-plumbing? This could be useful in the future since toilets vary in their wall clearance a bit.

Thanks,

Mike

Terry
07-24-2012, 08:53 AM
Does anyone make one with an eccentric offset so the drain position can be adjusted a half inch or so in any direction without re-plumbing?

No.

However you could install a 4x3 closet 90 with 4" closet flange, and within that 4" opening you could shift the bowl around.

I like the flanges with metal rings over the plastic flanges. Sioux Chief a TKO with a nice stainless ring. That comes in a 4x3 though.
They sell a flange extender too, that stacks the flange higher then the subfloor. It's a spacer that goes under the flange.

MikeQ
07-24-2012, 04:42 PM
I like the flanges with metal rings over the plastic flanges. Sioux Chief a TKO with a nice stainless ring. That comes in a 4x3 though.
They sell a flange extender too, that stacks the flange higher then the subfloor. It's a spacer that goes under the flange.

Thanks Terry.

Would it be preferable to install the flange on the subfloor with a spacer under the flange (and tile up to the flange) or to install the flange directly on the tile?

jadnashua
07-24-2012, 05:01 PM
Toilet flanges are designed to be installed on top of the finished floor, and be anchored through them into the subflooring. While you can add an extender to an existing one during remodeling, it does add one or more joints that could leak.

MikeQ
07-25-2012, 04:28 PM
Toilet flanges are designed to be installed on top of the finished floor, and be anchored through them into the subflooring. While you can add an extender to an existing one during remodeling, it does add one or more joints that could leak.

When you say "leak" are you speaking of sewer leakage? It sounds as if Terry was talking about a spacer that goes under the flange and therefore would not create additional joints that could leak. I'm far from an expert here but it does seem like mounting the flange on top of the plywood (with a spacer underneath) and tiling to the flange (with a caulked joint between tile edges and flange) would provide the neatest install. Do you see it otherwise?

I realize either way would probably be fine.

jadnashua
07-25-2012, 05:31 PM
The seal from the toilet to the flange is for two purposes (discounting the important hold the toilet to the floor!): prevent sewer gasses from escaping and second, keep waste from leaking. Note, that second issue often only becomes an issue if there is a blockage, and subsequent backup.

If you don't get the seal between the spacer and the flange sealed properly, it can leak in either or both manners.

Terry
07-25-2012, 06:26 PM
If I'm there before the tile and I have the spacer with me, that's how I install it. It doesn't' add any more joints. All it does is lift the flange a bit higher.

jadnashua
07-25-2012, 06:49 PM
It's one thing to add a spacer under the flange to raise it, and another to add one on top of an existing flange. The later is what people usually use the spacer for - raise an existing flange for remodel. But, obviously, it can be used the other way, too.

Terry
07-25-2012, 07:01 PM
I don't bother installing spacers on top. Those are the ones that fail. I would rather use two wax rings. Those work.

Spacers on top, unless you goo them up with Silicone between spacers, is a guaranteed leak ready to happen.

hj
07-26-2012, 06:49 AM
There are offset flanges, but they offset more than 1/2" and do NOT fit every situation.