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View Full Version : How Do These Irrigation Valves Shut Off?



sixgun95
06-16-2012, 09:50 PM
These are 2 of the valves for my sprinkler system. Can some explain to me how they operate? How do I shut them off manually? The two knobs I have circled, what do they do?

wallskev
06-17-2012, 03:12 AM
Look at these 2 : One is an older post.

http://www.terrylove.com/forums/showthread.php?7565-how-does-electric-sprinkler-valve-work


http://www.hunterindustries.com/support/how-does-irrigation-valve-work

The knob on top is normally used for flow control.

sixgun95
06-17-2012, 06:13 AM
Didn't help me at all, hopefully others will reply.

jimbo
06-17-2012, 07:44 AM
The ones on the left are valves...solenoid operated. You manually shut them off by turning the knob at the top, clockwise,

The two devices on the right...I don't think you turn them off. Look to be possibly combo filter and backflow preventer. Can't tell for sure in the photo.

Lakee911
06-17-2012, 07:46 AM
The ones on the left are valves...solenoid operated. You manually shut them off by turning the knob at the top, clockwise,

The two devices on the right...I don't think you turn them off. Look to be possibly combo filter and backflow preventer. Can't tell for sure in the photo.

Strainer or PRV?

hj
06-17-2012, 07:49 AM
The stem on the top of the valve is the manual flow control and shut off. It is easier to close the valve when the water is shut off, rather than "fight" the pressure of water flowing through the valve. The piece on the right is a filter, (you remove the cap and turn on the water to flush it out), the white thing to the right of the filter is a pressure regulator/volume control. However, if you have to manually shut it off, then there is a problem with the valve or the electronics that work it.

sixgun95
06-17-2012, 08:13 AM
The stem on the top of the valve is the manual flow control and shut off. It is easier to close the valve when the water is shut off, rather than "fight" the pressure of water flowing through the valve. The piece on the right is a filter, (you remove the cap and turn on the water to flush it out), the white thing to the right of the filter is a pressure regulator/volume control. However, if you have to manually shut it off, then there is a problem with the valve or the electronics that work it.

The piece on right, filter - just remove the small cap on top then turn water on to flush? It appears it may be designed for the whole top to come off, I assume to access filter. When to you backwash OR change these filters?

I have one zone that the water did not shut off. I then found a leak I need to fix today. If there is a leak in the line will the system stay on? Curious to know if maybe I have a valve problem as well.

hj
06-17-2012, 12:03 PM
quote; When to you backwash OR change these filters?

As a practical matter, almost never. The top unscrews to remove the filter screen, the small plug removes to flush out anything that the filter caught so it would not plug the heads. The valve will stay on, or close very slowly, IF there is a "huge" leak so there is not enough "residual back pressure" to close the valve.

sixgun95
06-17-2012, 12:50 PM
The solenoid operated valves - two questions

1. If I have one zone that is not shutting off with the timer 100% of the time, is the solenoid the problem? How do you troubleshoot the solenoid? NOTE: I did find a leak in the main line that runs from that particular valve assy to the heads. Would that possibly not allow the solenoid to close? I am fixing that today.

2. The knob on the solenoid valve, should that be full open?

jimbo
06-17-2012, 01:18 PM
The knob is also used to throttle the flow. Based on the other components, and the tubing in the photo, I assume this is a drip system, so often you do need to throttle it back.

Failure to turn off is not usually the solenoid, as it is spring loaded to return to she closed position. If the solenoid plunger got rusty or dirty, it could stick,

Usually, replace the diaphragm in the valve

sixgun95
06-17-2012, 03:10 PM
Excellent! Where can I find a replacement diaphragm? What is the best way to match it?

HJ - I am in North Scottsdale and work at the airpark if anyone knows of a place where I can find this part?



The knob is also used to throttle the flow. Based on the other components, and the tubing in the photo, I assume this is a drip system, so often you do need to throttle it back.

Failure to turn off is not usually the solenoid, as it is spring loaded to return to she closed position. If the solenoid plunger got rusty or dirty, it could stick,

Usually, replace the diaphragm in the valve

MACPLUMB 777
06-18-2012, 06:39 AM
Call browns plumbing parts, or go by and show them the picture, they should be able to match

jimbo
06-18-2012, 06:53 AM
The valves are probably Lawn Genie...Home Depot has parts\

BobL43
06-18-2012, 06:53 AM
Excellent! Where can I find a replacement diaphragm? What is the best way to match it?

HJ - I am in North Scottsdale and work at the airpark if anyone knows of a place where I can find this part?The solenoid valves in your photo looks like Richdale Lawn Genie Valves. I used to use them, and the cost of replacement parts was the same or more than a new valve. the most recent valves I bought were at HD and they cost about 14 bucks each for 1 inch ports with female pipe threads in each end. I think they were Toro brand. I said they looked like Lawn Genie beacause of what looks like those stainless steel semi circles under the assembly screws.

I just looked, and lawn genie sells the valves and parts online: https://www.lawngeniestore.com/Comergent/en/US/adirect/toro?cmd=ToroLGCatDisplayStyle&parentKey=700100&catKey=700106

the prices look very reasonable (did not look for shipping costs), but if you need more than 1 part, the whole valve is cheaper, and gives you a full set of spare parts to canibalize.

hj
06-18-2012, 07:35 AM
Ewing 8381 E Gelding, just East of the Post Office, on th South side of the street, where the road curves North to Redfield Road. Your valves are somewhat "generic" and have had many names over the years. The current Home Depot valves LOOK the same, but have different internals so they are not interchangeable.

bluebinky
06-18-2012, 01:19 PM
For drip irrigation, there are special low-flow valves that are supposed to work better and not clog up as often. Anyone have experience with them?

BobL43
06-18-2012, 02:25 PM
For drip irrigation, there are special low-flow valves that are supposed to work better and not clog up as often. Anyone have experience with them?
Rain Drip has special inline pressure reducing valves in 15 psi and 25psi choices that connect to the 1/2 inch black poly tubing. I have used both, and still do, but when a dripper emitter wants to clog up, it just does, with or without the pressure regulator, but the lower pressure is much less likely to blow a joint or emitter apart. I have lots and lots of drip irrigation for my wife's flower gardens, and uses (I guess??) several hundred dripper emitters and low volume sprayers.

bluebinky
06-18-2012, 04:25 PM
I googled some to refresh my memory. It seems that control valves have a "minimum flow rate". Below that, they are said to have problems with not shutting off eventually. If you have just a few emitters on a circuit, it could be a problem. No first hand experience, though...