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Cookie
10-09-2011, 02:14 PM
Now, in Ian's Corner you will a comparision citing
World CO2 emissions.

China has over 1.3 billion people and is slightly smaller than the US. China has one of the highest suicide rates in the world, particularly among rural women, an expert on suicide prevention.http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/china/2007-09/11/content_6095710.htm


The US has a population of: http://www.census.gov/population/www/popclockus.html

China has been the world's most populous nation for some time at 362 people per sq mi, twice as much as the United States. Not too much room for everyone to drive a car yet, they are now in the lead. http://www.chinahush.com/2009/10/21/amazing-pictures-pollution-in-china/

India, slightly more than 1/3 the size of the US, with a population of 1.1 billion continues to have :

Water supply and sanitation in India continue to be inadequate, despite longstanding efforts by the various levels of government and communities at improving coverage. The level of investment in water and sanitation, albeit low by international standards, has increased during the 2000s. Access has also increased significantly. For example, in 1980 rural sanitation coverage was estimated at 1% and reached 21% in 2008.[1][6] Also, the share of Indians with access to improved sources of water has increased significantly from 72% in 1990 to 88% in 2008.[1] At the same time, local government institutions in charge of operating and maintaining the infrastructure are seen as weak and lack the financial resources to carry out their functions. In addition, no major city in India is known to have a continuous water supply[7] and an estimated 72% of Indians still lack access to improved sanitation facilities.

Russia has a population of 139,390,205; is, approximately 1.8 times the size of the US. The male life expectancy is 59.5 years.
http://www.theodora.com/wfbcurrent/russia/russia_people.html

The Rest of the World, the 49% is composed of these places shown below. Africa is the world's second largest and second most populous continent, after Asia. At about 30.2 million km² (11.7 million sq mi) including adjacent islands, it covers 6% of the Earth's total surface area and 20.4% of the total land area.[2] With 1.0 billion people in 61 territories, it accounts for about 14.72% of the world's human population.

Africa remains the least developed continent, and the most plagued by disease, poverty and malnutrition.

What do you think might be the number of immigrants legal or otherwise in the USA? Do they drive cars, how many per family. Are they living in an area where the climate control is necessary by either air,fan,or heat. Is electricity being used to cook with, heat water with, or gas. I wonder what the USA true, legit, numbers are for emissions, but we will never know.

"There are currently 15 to 20 million illegal aliens in this country by many estimates, but the real numbers could be much higher and the numbers increase every day because our borders are not secure:

http://www.theamericanresistance.com/ref/illegal_alien_numbers.html

How has the govn's of these countries benefited its people?

How has these countries benefited anyone else.
Making money off of us, profits them, so it is not counted.




http://www.nationmaster.com/graph/geo_are_com-geography-area-comparative

Countries (A to Z) Description
Afghanistan slightly smaller than Texas
Akrotiri about 0.7 times the size of Washington, DC
Albania slightly smaller than Maryland
Algeria slightly less than 3.5 times the size of Texas
American Samoa slightly larger than Washington, DC
Andorra 2.5
Angola slightly less than twice the size of Texas
Anguilla about one-half the size of Washington, DC
Antarctica slightly less than 1.5 times the size of the US
Antigua and Barbuda 2.5
Arctic Ocean slightly less than 1.5 times the size of the US
Argentina slightly less than three-tenths the size of the US
Armenia slightly smaller than Maryland
Aruba slightly larger than Washington, DC
Ashmore and Cartier Islands about eight times the size of The Mall in Washington, DC
Atlantic Ocean slightly less than 6.5 times the size of the US
Australia slightly smaller than the US contiguous 48 states
Austria slightly smaller than Maine
Azerbaijan slightly smaller than Maine
Bahamas, The slightly smaller than Connecticut
Bahrain 3.5
Bangladesh slightly smaller than Iowa
Barbados 2.5
Bassas da India about one-third the size of The Mall in Washington, DC
Belarus slightly smaller than Kansas
Belgium about the size of Maryland
Belize slightly smaller than Massachusetts
Benin slightly smaller than Pennsylvania
Bermuda about one-third the size of Washington, DC
Bhutan about one-half the size of Indiana
Bolivia slightly less than three times the size of Montana
Bosnia and Herzegovina slightly smaller than West Virginia
Botswana slightly smaller than Texas
Bouvet Island about 0.3 times the size of Washington, DC
Brazil slightly smaller than the US
British Indian Ocean Territory land area is about 0.3 times the size of Washington, DC
British Virgin Islands about 0.9 times the size of Washington, DC
Brunei slightly smaller than Delaware
Bulgaria slightly larger than Tennessee
Burkina Faso slightly larger than Colorado
Burma slightly smaller than Texas
Burundi slightly smaller than Maryland
Cambodia slightly smaller than Oklahoma
Cameroon slightly larger than California
Canada slightly larger than the US
Cape Verde slightly larger than Rhode Island
Cayman Islands 1.5
Central African Republic slightly smaller than Texas
Chad slightly more than three times the size of California
Chile slightly smaller than twice the size of Montana
China slightly smaller than the US
Christmas Island about three-quarters the size of Washington, DC
Clipperton Island about 12 times the size of The Mall in Washington, DC
Cocos (Keeling) Islands about 24 times the size of The Mall in Washington, DC
Colombia slightly less than twice the size of Texas
Comoros slightly more than 12 times the size of Washington, DC
Congo, Democratic Republic of the slightly less than one-fourth the size of the US
Congo, Republic of the slightly smaller than Montana
Cook Islands 1.3
Coral Sea Islands NA
Costa Rica slightly smaller than West Virginia
Croatia slightly smaller than West Virginia
Cuba slightly smaller than Pennsylvania
Cyprus about 0.6 times the size of Connecticut
Czech Republic slightly smaller than South Carolina
Côte d'Ivoire slightly larger than New Mexico
Denmark slightly less than twice the size of Massachusetts
Dhekelia about three-quarters the size of Washington, DC
Djibouti slightly smaller than Massachusetts
Dominica slightly more than four times the size of Washington, DC
Dominican Republic slightly more than twice the size of New Hampshire
East Timor slightly larger than Connecticut
Ecuador slightly smaller than Nevada
Egypt slightly more than three times the size of New Mexico
El Salvador slightly smaller than Massachusetts
Equatorial Guinea slightly smaller than Maryland
Eritrea slightly larger than Pennsylvania
Estonia slightly smaller than New Hampshire and Vermont combined
Ethiopia slightly less than twice the size of Texas
Europa Island about 0.16 times the size of Washington, DC
European Union less than one-half the size of the US
Falkland Islands (Islas Malvinas) slightly smaller than Connecticut
Faroe Islands eight times the size of Washington, DC
Fiji slightly smaller than New Jersey
Finland slightly smaller than Montana
France slightly less than the size of Texas
French Guiana slightly smaller than Indiana
French Polynesia slightly less than one-third the size of Connecticut
French Southern and Antarctic Lands slightly less than 1.3 times the size of Delaware
Gabon slightly smaller than Colorado
Gambia, The slightly less than twice the size of Delaware
Gaza Strip slightly more than twice the size of Washington, DC
Georgia slightly smaller than South Carolina
Germany slightly smaller than Montana
Ghana slightly smaller than Oregon
Gibraltar more than 10 times the size of The National Mall in Washington, D.C.
Glorioso Islands about eight times the size of The Mall in Washington, DC
Greece slightly smaller than Alabama
Greenland slightly more than three times the size of Texas
Grenada twice the size of Washington, DC
Guadeloupe 10 times the size of Washington, DC
Guam three times the size of Washington, DC
Guatemala slightly smaller than Tennessee
Guernsey about one-half the size of Washington, DC
Guinea slightly smaller than Oregon
Guinea-Bissau slightly less than three times the size of Connecticut
Guyana slightly smaller than Idaho
Haiti slightly smaller than Maryland
Heard Island and McDonald Islands slightly more than two times the size of Washington, DC
Holy See (Vatican City) about 0.7 times the size of The National Mall in Washington, DC
Honduras slightly larger than Tennessee
Hong Kong six times the size of Washington, DC
Hungary slightly smaller than Indiana
Iceland slightly smaller than Kentucky
India slightly more than one-third the size of the US
Indian Ocean about 5.5 times the size of the US
Indonesia slightly less than three times the size of Texas
Iran slightly smaller than Alaska
Iraq slightly more than twice the size of Idaho
Ireland slightly larger than West Virginia
Israel slightly larger than New Jersey
Italy slightly larger than Arizona
Jamaica slightly smaller than Connecticut
Jan Mayen slightly more than twice the size of Washington, DC
Japan slightly smaller than California
Jersey about two-thirds the size of Washington, DC
Jordan slightly smaller than Indiana
Juan de Nova Island about seven times the size of The Mall in Washington, DC
Kazakhstan slightly less than four times the size of Texas
Kenya slightly more than twice the size of Nevada
Kiribati four times the size of Washington, DC
Korea, North slightly smaller than Mississippi
Korea, South slightly larger than Indiana
Kuwait slightly smaller than New Jersey
Kyrgyzstan slightly smaller than South Dakota
Laos slightly larger than Utah
Latvia slightly larger than West Virginia
Lebanon about 0.7 times the size of Connecticut
Lesotho slightly smaller than Maryland
Liberia slightly larger than Tennessee
Libya slightly larger than Alaska
Liechtenstein about 0.9 times the size of Washington, DC
Lithuania slightly larger than West Virginia
Luxembourg slightly smaller than Rhode Island
Macau less than one-sixth the size of Washington, DC
Macedonia, Republic of slightly larger than Vermont
Madagascar slightly less than twice the size of Arizona
Malawi slightly smaller than Pennsylvania
Malaysia slightly larger than New Mexico
Maldives about 1.7 times the size of Washington, DC
Mali slightly less than twice the size of Texas
Malta slightly less than twice the size of Washington, DC
Man, Isle of slightly more than three times the size of Washington, DC
Marshall Islands about the size of Washington, DC
Martinique slightly more than six times the size of Washington, DC
Mauritania slightly larger than three times the size of New Mexico
Mauritius almost 11 times the size of Washington, DC
Mayotte slightly more than twice the size of Washington, DC
Mexico slightly less than three times the size of Texas
Micronesia, Federated States of four times the size of Washington, DC (land area only)
Moldova slightly larger than Maryland
Monaco about three times the size of The Mall in Washington, DC
Mongolia slightly smaller than Alaska
Montserrat about 0.6 times the size of Washington, DC
Morocco slightly larger than California
Mozambique slightly less than twice the size of California
Namibia slightly more than half the size of Alaska
Nauru about 0.1 times the size of Washington, DC
Navassa Island about nine times the size of The Mall in Washington, DC
Nepal slightly larger than Arkansas
Netherlands slightly less than twice the size of New Jersey
Netherlands Antilles more than five times the size of Washington, DC
New Caledonia slightly smaller than New Jersey
New Zealand about the size of Colorado
Nicaragua slightly smaller than New York state
Niger slightly less than twice the size of Texas
Nigeria slightly more than twice the size of California
Niue 1.5
Norfolk Island about 0.2 times the size of Washington, DC
Northern Mariana Islands 2.5
Norway slightly larger than New Mexico
Oman slightly smaller than Kansas
Pacific Ocean about 15 times the size of the US; covers about 28% of the global surface; larger than the total land area of the world
Pakistan slightly less than twice the size of California
Palau slightly more than 2.5 times the size of Washington, DC
Panama slightly smaller than South Carolina
Papua New Guinea slightly larger than California
Paraguay slightly smaller than California
Peru slightly smaller than Alaska
Philippines slightly larger than Arizona
Pitcairn Islands about 0.3 times the size of Washington, DC
Poland slightly smaller than New Mexico
Portugal slightly smaller than Indiana
Puerto Rico slightly less than three times the size of Rhode Island
Qatar slightly smaller than Connecticut
Romania slightly smaller than Oregon
Russia approximately 1.8 times the size of the US
Rwanda slightly smaller than Maryland
Réunion slightly smaller than Rhode Island
Saint Barthelemy less than an eighth of the size of Washington, DC
Saint Helena slightly more than twice the size of Washington, DC
Saint Kitts and Nevis 1.5
Saint Lucia 3.5
Saint Martin more than one-third the size of Washington, DC
Saint Pierre and Miquelon 1.5
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines twice the size of Washington, DC
Samoa slightly smaller than Rhode Island
San Marino about one third times the size of Washington, DC
Saudi Arabia slightly more than one-fifth the size of the US
Senegal slightly smaller than South Dakota
Serbia and Montenegro slightly smaller than South Carolina
Seychelles 2.5
Sierra Leone slightly smaller than South Carolina
Singapore slightly more than 3.5 times the size of Washington, DC
Slovakia about twice the size of New Hampshire
Slovenia slightly smaller than New Jersey
Solomon Islands slightly smaller than Maryland
Somalia slightly smaller than Texas
South Africa slightly less than twice the size of Texas
South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands slightly larger than Rhode Island
Southern Ocean slightly more than twice the size of the US
Spain slightly more than twice the size of Oregon
Sri Lanka slightly larger than West Virginia
Sudan slightly more than one-quarter the size of the US
Suriname slightly larger than Georgia
Svalbard slightly smaller than West Virginia
Swaziland slightly smaller than New Jersey
Sweden slightly larger than California
Switzerland slightly less than twice the size of New Jersey
Syria slightly larger than North Dakota
São Tomé and Príncipe more than five times the size of Washington, DC
Taiwan slightly smaller than Maryland and Delaware combined
Tajikistan slightly smaller than Wisconsin
Tanzania slightly larger than twice the size of California
Thailand slightly more than twice the size of Wyoming
Togo slightly smaller than West Virginia
Tokelau about 17 times the size of The Mall in Washington, DC
Tonga four times the size of Washington, DC
Trinidad and Tobago slightly smaller than Delaware
Tromelin Island about 1.7 times the size of The Mall in Washington, DC
Tunisia slightly larger than Georgia
Turkey slightly larger than Texas
Turkmenistan slightly larger than California
Turks and Caicos Islands 2.5
Tuvalu 0.1
Uganda slightly smaller than Oregon
Ukraine slightly smaller than Texas
United Arab Emirates slightly smaller than Maine
United Kingdom slightly smaller than Oregon
United States about half the size of Russia; about three-tenths the size of Africa; about half the size of South America (or slightly larger than Brazil); slightly larger than China; more than twice the size of the European Union
Uruguay slightly smaller than the state of Washington
Uzbekistan slightly larger than California
Vanuatu slightly larger than Connecticut
Venezuela slightly more than twice the size of California
Vietnam slightly larger than New Mexico
Virgin Islands twice the size of Washington, DC
Wake Island about 11 times the size of The Mall in Washington, DC
Wallis and Futuna 1.5
West Bank slightly smaller than Delaware
Western Sahara about the size of Colorado
Yemen slightly larger than twice the size of Wyoming
Zambia slightly larger than Texas
Zimbabwe slightly larger than Montana

Cookie
10-09-2011, 02:51 PM
List of countries by 2008 emissionsRank Country Annual CO2 emissions
(in thousands of metric tonnes) Percentage of global total

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_carbon_dioxide_emissions

World 29,888,121 100%

1 China[10] 7,031,916 23.33%
2 United States 5,461,014 18.11%
- European Union (27) 4,177,817.86[11] 14.04%
3 India 1,742,698 5.78%
4 Russia 1,708,653 5.67%
5 Japan 1,208,163 4.01%
6 Germany 786,660 2.61%
7 Canada 544,091 1.80%
8 Iran 538,404 1.79%
9 United Kingdom 522,856 1.73%
10 South Korea 509,170 1.69%
11 Mexico 475,834 1.58%
12 Italy[12] 445,119 1.48%
13 South Africa 435,878 1.45%
14 Saudi Arabia 433,557 1.44%
15 Indonesia 406,029 1.35%
16 Australia 399,219 1.32%
17 Brazil 393,220 1.30%
18 France[13] 376,986 1.25%
19 Spain 329,286 1.09%
20 Ukraine 323,532 1.07%
21 Poland 316,066 1.05%
22 Thailand 285,733 0.95%
23 Turkey 283,980 0.94%
24 Taiwan 258,599[14] 0.86%
25 Kazakhstan 236,954 0.79%
26 Egypt 210,321 0.70%
27 Malaysia 208,267 0.69%
28 Argentina 192,378 0.64%
29 Netherlands 173,750 0.58%
30 Venezuela 169,533 0.56%
31 Pakistan 163,178 0.54%
32 United Arab Emirates 155,066 0.51%
33 Vietnam 127,384 0.42%
34 Uzbekistan 124,905 0.41%
35 Czech Republic 116,996 0.39%
36 Algeria 111,304 0.37%
37 Belgium 104,880 0.35%
38 Iraq 102,936 0.34%
39 Greece 97,814 0.32%
40 Nigeria 95,756 0.32%
41 Romania 94,660 0.31%
42 Philippines 83,157 0.28%
43 North Korea 78,371 0.26%
44 Kuwait 76,743 0.25%
45 Chile 73,109 0.24%
46 Syria 71,598 0.24%
47 Qatar 68,478 0.23%
48 Austria 67,726 0.22%
49 Colombia 67,700 0.22%
50 Belarus 62,816 0.21%
51 Libya 58,331 0.19%
52 Finland 56,512 0.19%
53 Portugal 56,310 0.19%
54 Hungary 54,638 0.18%
55 Bulgaria 50,539 0.17%
56 Norway 49,920 0.17%
57 Serbia 49,934 0.17%
58 Trinidad and Tobago 49,772 0.17%
59 Sweden 49,050 0.16%
60 Morocco 47,906 0.16%
61 Turkmenistan 47,840 0.16%
62 Azerbaijan 47,139 0.16%
63 Bangladesh 46,527 0.15%
64 Denmark 46,025 0.15%
65 Oman 45,749 0.15%
66 Ireland 43,604 0.14%
67 Peru 40,535 0.13%
68 Switzerland 40,392 0.13%
69 Hong Kong 38,573 0.13%
70 Israel 37,664 0.12%
71 Slovakia 37,557 0.12%
72 New Zealand 33,095 0.11%
73 Singapore 32,295 0.11%
74 Cuba 31,419 0.10%
75 Bosnia and Herzegovina 31,276 0.10%
76 Ecuador 26,826 0.09%
77 Tunisia 25,013 0.08%
78 Angola 24,371 0.08%
79 Yemen 23,384 0.08%
80 Croatia 23,304 0.08%
81 Bahrain 22,479 0.07%
82 Dominican Republic 21,617 0.07%
83 Jordan 21,382 0.07%
84 Estonia 18,291 0.06%
85 Slovenia 17,158 0.06%
86 Lebanon 17,099 0.06%
87 Lithuania 15,130 0.05%
88 Sudan 14,052 0.05%
89 Bolivia 12,835 0.04%
90 Myanmar 12,776 0.04%
91 Jamaica 12,204 0.04%
92 Guatemala 11,914 0.04%
93 Macedonia 11,815 0.04%
94 Sri Lanka 11,764 0.04%
95 Mongolia 10,895 0.04%
96 Brunei 10,594 0.04%
97 Luxembourg 10,502 0.03%
98 Kenya 10,392 0.03%
99 Zimbabwe 9,076 0.03%
100 Honduras 8,672 0.03%
101 Ghana 8,592 0.03%
102 Cyprus 8,328 0.03%
103 Uruguay 8,328 0.03%
104 Costa Rica 8,016 0.03%
105 Latvia 7,591 0.03%
106 Ethiopia 7,107 0.02%
107 Côte d'Ivoire 7,015 0.02%
108 Panama 6,912 0.02%
109 Tanzania 6,465 0.02%
110 Netherlands Antilles 6,219 0.02%
111 Kyrgyzstan 6,208 0.02%
112 El Salvador 6,113 0.02%
113 Armenia 5,548 0.02%
114 Cameroon 5,302 0.02%
115 Georgia 5,203 0.02%
116 Senegal 4,976 0.02%
117 Botswana 4,840 0.02%
118 Equatorial Guinea 4,815 0.02%
119 Moldova 4,774 0.02%
120 Cambodia 4,602 0.02%
121 Nicaragua 4,331 0.01%
123 Albania 4,117 0.01%
124 Paraguay 4,118 0.01%
125 Benin 4,067 0.01%
126 Namibia 3,968 0.01%
127 Mauritius 3,953 0.01%
128 Uganda 3,748 0.01%
129 Nepal 3,542 0.01%
130 New Caledonia 3,150 0.01%
131 Tajikistan 3,146 0.01%
132 Democratic Republic of the Congo 2,816 0.01%
133 Réunion 2,816 0.01%
134 Malta 2,560 0.01%
135 Gabon 2,472 0.01%
136 Suriname 2,439 0.01%
137 Haiti 2,435 0.01%
138 Mozambique 2,314 0.01%
139 Aruba 2,288 0.01%
140 Iceland 2,230 0.01%
141 Guadeloupe 2,200 0.01%
142 Bahamas 2,156 0.01%
143 Papua New Guinea 2,109 0.01%
144 Palestinian territories 2,057 0.01%
145 Mauritania 1,999 0.01%
146 Montenegro 1,951 0.01%
147 Republic of the Congo 1,936 0.01%
148 Martinique 1,918 0.01%
149 Madagascar 1,911 0.01%
150 Zambia 1,889 0.01%
151 Burkina Faso 1,856 0.01%
152 Laos 1,533 0.01%
153 Guyana 1,525 0.01%
154 Togo 1,419 < 0.01%
155 Guinea 1,393 < 0.01%
156 Barbados 1,353 < 0.01%
157 Macau 1,335 < 0.01%
158 Sierra Leone 1,335 < 0.01%
159 Fiji 1,254 < 0.01%
160 Malawi 1,228 < 0.01%
161 Swaziland 1,093 < 0.01%
162 Maldives 920 < 0.01%
163 French Guiana 913 < 0.01%
164 French Polynesia 891 < 0.01%
165 Niger 851 < 0.01%
166 Afghanistan 814 < 0.01%
167 Bhutan 733 < 0.01%
168 Faroe Islands 708 < 0.01%
169 Rwanda 704 < 0.01%
170 Seychelles 682 < 0.01%
171 Somalia 649 < 0.01%
172 Liberia 609 < 0.01%
173 Mali 594 < 0.01%
174 Greenland 576 < 0.01%
175 Cayman Islands 557 < 0.01%
176 Andorra 539 < 0.01%
177 Djibouti 524 < 0.01%
178 Chad 495 < 0.01%
179 Antigua and Barbuda 447 < 0.01%
180 Belize 425 < 0.01%
181 Gibraltar 422 < 0.01%
182 Eritrea 414 < 0.01%
183 Gambia 411 < 0.01%
184 Saint Lucia 396 < 0.01%
185 Bermuda 389 < 0.01%
186 Cape Verde 308 < 0.01%
187 Guinea-Bissau 282 < 0.01%
188 Central African Republic 260 < 0.01%
189 Saint Kitts and Nevis 249 < 0.01%
190 Grenada 246 < 0.01%
191 Sahrawi Arab Democratic Republic 238 < 0.01%
192 Palau 213 < 0.01%
193 Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 202 < 0.01%
194 Solomon Islands 198 < 0.01%
195 Timor-Leste 191 < 0.01%
196 Burundi 180 < 0.01%
197 Tonga 176 < 0.01%
198 Samoa 161 < 0.01%
199 Turks and Caicos Islands 158 < 0.01%
200 Nauru 143 < 0.01%
201 Dominica 128 < 0.01%
202 São Tomé and Príncipe 128 < 0.01%
203 Comoros 125 < 0.01%
204 British Virgin Islands 103 < 0.01%
205 Marshall Islands 99 < 0.01%
206 Vanuatu 92 < 0.01%
207 Montserrat 77 < 0.01%
208 Cook Islands 70 < 0.01%
209 Saint Pierre and Miquelon 66 < 0.01%
210 Federated States of Micronesia 62 < 0.01%
211 Anguilla 59 < 0.01%
212 Falkland Islands 59 < 0.01%
213 Kiribati 29 < 0.01%
214 Wallis and Futuna 22 < 0.01%
215 Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha 11 < 0.01%
216 Niue 4 < 0.01%

BobL43
10-09-2011, 03:39 PM
Cookie, being sick is not good at all but it gives you lots of spare time, which IS good:)

Cookie
10-09-2011, 04:44 PM
ha ha ha. I know. :) But, I figured out that if you took a country and did the math, dividing the size, the population, into, the US and its size and its population, then, figured in the emission ratio, and using a formula, figuring in the loss and gain of technology which might explain the low ratio for certain countries, ie, Africa, small country; the gain for China, other determining factors, illegals,etc. Then, it comes out that the US has been doing its job when compared fairly as would be in my formula. It would show that the numbers and the success we have provided for our citizens, plus, those that don't even rightfully belong here, has been great compared to the other countries with water system problems, over population, lifespan, mental health, and pollution such as we dealt with years ago, and so on. It is all a mathematic algorithm.

I am feeling a tadbit better. :)

Cookie
10-09-2011, 04:53 PM
So, when you do the math, you can be rest assured, we are doing our job at making this world a better place to live. When you figure in the numbers, all the determining factors all the possible variables, that emission number is incorrect, wrong.

Cookie
10-09-2011, 04:54 PM
Just like my spelling. BUT, my math is never wrong. :)

leejosepho
10-09-2011, 04:56 PM
... I figured out that if you took a country and did the math ... it comes out that the US has been doing its job when compared fairly as would be in my formula ...
Do you know the difference between a bookkeeper and an accountant?

A bookkeeper will tell you what the numbers say, and an account will ask you what you want the numbers to say ...

Are you studying to become an accountant?!

Cookie
10-09-2011, 04:56 PM
Whose number is high is Ian's. :)

Cookie
10-09-2011, 04:56 PM
I had a few math classes, lol. :)

Cookie
10-09-2011, 05:00 PM
Do the math. It is easy. You will see. But, you will need to determine a few things first. They factor in. To do that, you need to study the %'s of that chart, of each country, its size, its population.

And, read about the quality of life for each one, or the one you are interesed in at least; like India, for instance, water system, is not good at all for so many people. That is a factor. and, so on.

As you go along you write out the formula and it just starts to apply. I am weird because my hobby is math.

Cookie
10-09-2011, 05:15 PM
I think Ian's is high due to when they are done riding those bikes, or need new tires, they must burn them. :)

See, here in the US, we use them for on the roads, in gardens, trees, heck, I gave away one for a Xmas present one year when money was tough. He didn't like it but it was the thought that counts, right? :)

It made a beautiful planter. I dug up a couple of my neighbor's plants and it looked beautiful in it.

*Come to think of it, I never saw an English Garden with a truck tire illustrated in Homes & Gardens. Why is this? :)

Jerome2877
10-10-2011, 12:04 AM
ha ha ha. I know. But, I figured out that if you took a country and did the math, dividing the size, the population, into, the US and its size and its population, then, figured in the emission ratio, and using a formula, figuring in the loss and gain of technology which might explain the low ratio for certain countries, ie, Africa, small country; the gain for China, other determining factors, illegals,etc. Then, it comes out that the US has been doing its job when compared fairly as would be in my formula. It would show that the numbers and the success we have provided for our citizens, plus, those that don't even rightfully belong here, has been great compared to the other countries with water system problems, over population, lifespan, mental health, and pollution such as we dealt with years ago, and so on. It is all a mathematic algorithm.

The facts don't change by doing mathematical formulas! No country is truly doing a good job to lower its emmisions. Until we change our greedy overindugent ways especially in North America, there will be no significant change! If it makes you feel better though, then keep doing your formulas that pull the wool over your own eyes.

Cookie
10-10-2011, 02:29 AM
"I see, said the blind man, to his deaf dog, and he picked up his hammer and saw"

Cookie
10-10-2011, 03:35 AM
Now Ian, this is new out:

China and India account for half of global energy growth through 2035 ›

Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Today in Energy , September 19, 2011.
http://www.eia.gov/analysis/

Cookie
10-10-2011, 03:36 AM
My question is this, Ian, what are the reasons for such a huge growth.

Cookie
10-10-2011, 03:41 AM
How and why does it factor in.

Cookie
10-10-2011, 03:59 AM
EIA projects declines in U.S. average energy use per person and per dollar of GDP ›
Same website projects a decline in he US average energy use per person.

Again, their are variables as to why. And, mathematically, it should be factored in to be understood and compared, ie education, improving water systems, health improving, less population, more population, longer lifespans, shorter lifespans, more jobs, less jobs, the economy of each country, etc, they are all components to the larger picture. Each component is part of the solution.

Ian Gills
10-10-2011, 06:08 AM
Cookie, if you want these sorts of debates then the Corner is better suited to having them.

I'll we waiting over there with Bob.

But...

First, Jerome is right.

Secondly, China's and India's emissions are rising because the goods you buy are made there (no longer in America) and their standard of living is increasing. Plus those are big countries, with many times the population of America.

But emissions for making things aren't really the issue. If you look at the numbers, most CO2 emissions come from transportation (cars and trucks) and heating and cooling for homes.

Per person, America does real bad on both counts.

Tax gas. Tax coal. And promote the use of renewables. Do it now. Or China will develop the technology and America will miss the boat.

You'll just have to lose the V8. And I'll have to stop internet shopping from stores in California!

BobL43
10-10-2011, 06:33 AM
Cookie, if you want these sorts of debates then the Corner is better suited to having them.

I'll we waiting over there with Bob.

But...



Bob is not over there except to use it as a rest room. for both 1 & 2

Cookie
10-10-2011, 09:11 AM
You or anyone at all, are entitled to your opinions of course, just so you realize they are wrong. :) When you say, "americans" per person, is this including the millions not really legal to be here? If the mass amount of people in India is enjoying a better lifestyle, could it be because now they have money to buy things? to climate control? to own a car? Too create more global warming all on their own. We are damn if we do, or damn if we don't with you and other countries. Are you saying, that we should let them live in poverty or squalor? And, China, are you saying that they do not have the capabilities to clean up their own pollution? Ian, do you realize how you sound regarding your attitudes toward Americans? You say you love us, but, to me, it is more of a slap and a tickle, which is gross. China has more than enough of manpower to clean up their country of pollution and enough of scientists to do what WE did...here, in the US. You need to rethink things regarding what you are saying about these things, for you only see and understand things from a very anti american view.

Bob and I are very happy over here with our debates, of course you are welcomed but, this works for us as fine and dandy as a frog hair split 8 ways.



Cookie, if you want these sorts of debates then the Corner is better suited to having them.

I'll we waiting over there with Bob.

But...

First, Jerome is right.

Secondly, China's and India's emissions are rising because the goods you buy are made there (no longer in America) and their standard of living is increasing. Plus those are big countries, with many times the population of America.

But emissions for making things aren't really the issue. If you look at the numbers, most CO2 emissions come from transportation (cars and trucks) and heating and cooling for homes.

Per person, America does real bad on both counts.

Tax gas. Tax coal. And promote the use of renewables. Do it now. Or China will develop the technology and America will miss the boat.

You'll just have to lose the V8. And I'll have to stop internet shopping from stores in California!

Jerome2877
10-10-2011, 01:00 PM
Are you saying, that we should let them live in poverty or squalor? And, China, are you saying that they do not have the capabilities to clean up their own pollution?

Let them? Who are you, Team America World Police? LOL. China and other countries are fully capable of lowering their emissions but they don't do it including the US! Bush backed out of the Kyoto agreement that would have required many mandatory restrictions on emissions, this set you guys behind many nations that have continued to honor it.

Cookie
10-10-2011, 02:21 PM
World police, yeah, anti american... we are damn if we do and damned if we don't.

I said, what I said in response to Ian's post:

Secondly, China's and India's emissions are rising because the goods you buy are made there (no longer in America) and their standard of living is increasing. Plus those are big countries, with many times the population of America.

Damned if we do, and damned if we don't. Should we care, or should't we care. LOL...

Ian Gills
10-10-2011, 04:17 PM
People who will be alive in 2050 should care.

The more severe estimates for global warming are a 30 feet rise in sea level and half the planet being uninhabitable.

Not to mention worse weather. And America gets bad weather in a good year.

So, should you care for yourself? Probably not.

But you should definitely care for your kids.

I do.

Unless we make the changes now, America will be unviable. It's too big and depends on the things climate change impacts will cause us to alter most severely, like road transport and coal-powered energy generation.

It needs to adapt and we need Government regulation and taxes to steer that change.

We need to end this sense of entitlement to pollute. You do not have the right to drive a V8 without paying an environmental tax. You do not have the right to use energy made from fossil fuel without paying for the environmental damage burning that fuel causes.

If you can't afford it, don't use it and quit moaning.

Cookie
10-10-2011, 04:36 PM
We could always reduce our population, thus reducing what we emit. What do you think Ian?

Is that a plan?

How odd you are complaining about the same ole' same ole' song & dance, taxes, when, all our systems in the USA are being bogged down by those who are here illegally. Yet, you think, that is okay...

It is the law.

Cookie
10-10-2011, 04:49 PM
I admire what the govn has done for all their other countries, they are all doing so very well. ;)